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CAVALRY TACTICS:

OR,

 

 

 

REGULATIONS

FOR THE

 

 

Instruction, Formations, and Movements

OF

 

 

THE CAVALRY

OF THE

 

 

ARMY AND VOLUNTEERS OF THE UNITED STATES.

 

PREPARED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE WAR

DEPARTMENT,

 

 

AND AUTHORIZED AND ADOPTED BY

 

 

THE SECRETARY OF WAR.

 

By PHILIP ST. GEO. COOKE,

BRIG. GEN. U. S. ARMY.

 

 

VOL. I.

 

PhILADELPHIA:

J. B. LIPPINCOTT & Co.

1862.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

­­­­­­­­­­­­______________________________________________________

 

 

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1861, by

 

J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.

in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of the United States for

the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

 

 

 

______________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

                               War Department,

 

November 1, 1861.

 

THE system of Tactics and Regulations for the Cavalry of the United States, by Colonel PHILIP ST. Geo. Cooke, 2d Cavalry, having been approved by the President, is now published fur the government of said service.

Accordingly, instruction in the same will be given after the method pointed out therein; and all additions to or departures from the exercise and maneuvres laid down in the system are positively forbidden.

SIMON CAMERON,

Secretary of War.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CAVALRY TACTICS.

 

­­­­­­­___________

 

VOLUME I

 

SOHOOL OF THE TROOPER OF THE PLATOON, AND

 

OF THE SQUADRON.



TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

TITLE FIRST.

 

BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

            Page.

ARTICLE I.—Formation of a regiment of ten squadrons in line     3

                  Posts of the officers and non-commissioned off-

   i­cers or the field and staff of a regiment In line.       4 

Posts of the officers and non-commissioned off-

   icers of a squadron in line. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .5             

Assembly or a regiment, mounted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6         

Assembly of a regiment, dismounted . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7   

Dress parade and guard mounting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7       

The standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9   

Salute with the standard and sabre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9        

The order of battle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

ARTICLE II.—Formation of a regiment in column . . . . . . . . . . . .11

Order in column by twos or fours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Order in column of platoons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13

Order in close column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Order in double column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Compliments by cavalry under review . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

Form and course of inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

ARTICLE  III.—Duties of instructors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

ARTICLE  IV.—Division, order, and progression of instruction . 21

ARTICLE   V.—Gradation of instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..22

Recruits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Corporals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Sergeants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23                  

Officers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  24  

ARTICLE VIInstruction to mount without saddle, and to

                 saddle         . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .24
                Manner of vaulting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .25

                Manner of rolling the cloak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .25
                Manner of saddling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

ARTICLE VIIOf training horses which have already been rid-

                    den. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26

Preparatory lesson. To make a horse tractable

                     and steady at mounting  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS.

             Page.

ARTICLE VII—Continued.

To bend or supple the horse’s neck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28     

            How to make a horse obey the pressure of the leg . . . . . 31
            Circling on the haunches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
            Reining back . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  34
            The horses paces, walk, trot, and canter . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
            Demi-pirouette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
            Manner of accustoming the horses to leap . . . . . . . . . . .37

To accustom horses to firing and military noises . . . . . .38

Practice of paces for maneuver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

ARTICLE VIII.—Definitions and general principles . . . . . . . . . . .39

ARTICLE IX.—Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  43

 

 

 

TITLE SECOND.

INSTRUCTION ON FOOT.

 

School or the trooper, dismounted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45      

Position of trooper, dismounted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .  .  46
            Eyes right—eyes left . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  46
            Right face, left face, about face, right—oblique.
                  face, left—oblique face
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   47
            Common step  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  48
            To change feet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
            To march by a flank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  49
            To face to the right or left when marching . . . . . . . . . . . 50

            Oblique face to the right or left when marching . . . . . . . 50
            Quick step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   51                      
            Double quick step . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .51
            Sabre exercise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
            General observations and directions   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
            Manual of the pistol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  65
            Inspection of arms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  67                 
            Target practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

            Platoon, squadron, and regiment dismounted . . . . . . . .  69

 

________

 

TITLE THIRD.

INSTRUCTION ON HORSEBACK.

 

1st LESSON  Scbool of the trooper, mounted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73

 Position of the trooper, before mounting . . . . . . . . . .74

To mount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74


TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

 

            Page.

1st LESSON—Continued.

            To dismount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  75
            Position of the trooper mounted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
            The use of the reins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76                  
            The use of the legs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .77
            The effect of the reins and legs combined . . . . . . . . . . . 77   
            To march . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  78
            To halt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

            To turn to the right and to the left . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
            To turn about to the right and to the left . . . . . . . . . . . . 79

To make a third of a lure to the right and to the

                left . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   79

            To rein back, and to cease reining back . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
            To file off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  81

2d LESSONTo march to the right hand, and to march to the

                left hand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
            To turn to the right and to the left in marching . . . . . . . 82
           
To halt, and to step off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
            To pass from the walk to the trot, and from the
                trot to the walk
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
            Changes of hand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
            To turn to the right and to the left by trooper in
                marching
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
            To turn about to the right and to the left by
                trooper in marching on the same line
. . . . . . . . . . . . .86

  The same movements in marching in column . . . . . . . . 86
3d LESSONOf the spur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
          To march to the right hand or to the left hand  . . . . . . . . .89
          To pass from the walk to the trot, and from the
              trot to the walk
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90                   
          Change of direction in the breadth of the riding
              house
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .90
          Change of direction obliquely by trooper . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
          To march in a circle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92
4th LESSON—To turn to the right or to the left by trooper in 

   marching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92

To turn about to the right, or to the left, the
              troopers marching on the same line, (or abreast)
. . . . 93
          The same, the troopers marching in column  . . . . . . . . . .94
          To pass successively from the bead to the rear of
              the column
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
          Being halted, to commence the move at a trot . . . . . . . . 95
          Marching at a trot, to halt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95              
          To pass from the trot to the trot-out, and from the
              trot-out to the trot
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
          To pass from the trot to the gallop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97
         
To passage to the right or to the left, the head to
              the wall
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  98
         
To passage to the right or to the left, being in

   column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS.

 

          Page.

5th LESSON--To take the snaffle in the right hand . . . . . . . . . . 101

            To drop the snaffle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
            The principal movements of the bridle hand   . . . . . . . . 101
            To gather the horse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  102
            To march . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  102
            To halt . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  102
            To turn to the right in marching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
            To turn to the left in marching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

To turn about to the right and to the left in

                marching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   103
            To make an oblique turn to the right and to the
                left in marching
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  103
            To rein back, and to cease reining heck . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

            Exercise of the 4th lesson with the curb bridle  . . . . . . 104

To passage to the right and to the left . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104

6th LESSON.—Principles of the gallop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105

            Exercise et the gallop upon right lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

            Exercise at the gallop on the circle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  107
7th LESSON.—Exercise of the 6th lesson with the sabre only . 107
            Manual of arms at a halt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   108
            To fire the pistol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   110
            To load the pistol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  111
            Inspection of arms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  111
            Sabre exercise at a halt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  113
8th LESSON.—Manual of arms in marching . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  .113

            Sabre exercise at all gaits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   114
            Leaping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   114
            To leap the ditch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   114
            To leap the fence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  114
            Individual charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  115
            Circling on the forehand and haunches and demi­-
             pirouette
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
            Target practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117
            Record and reports of target firing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118

 

SCHOOL 0F THE PLAT0ON, MOUNTED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121

ARTICLE  1.—General principles of alignment . . . . . . . . . . . . .122

Successive alignment of files in the platoon . . . . . . . .  122

Alignment of the platoon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

To break the platoon by file, by twos, and by fours . . . 125

Direct march in column by file, by twos, and by

   fours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125

Change of direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126

To halt, and to commence the march, in column . . . . . 127

Individual oblique march . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

The platoon marching in column by file, by twos, or by   

   fours, to form line face to the front, to the

   left, and to the right . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   128

Manual of arms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  131

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS. 


            Page.

ARTICLE II.—To form twos and fours at the same gait . . . . . . .131

To break by twos and by file at the same gait . . . . . . 132

To form twos and fours in doubling the gait . . . . . . . 133

To break by twos and by file in doubling the gait . . . 135

Sabre exercise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136                     

ARTICLE III.—Direct march of the platoon in line . . . . . . . . . . .136

Countermarch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  141

Wheelings . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  142

To wheel on a fixed pivot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143

To wheel on a movable pivot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

Individual oblique march . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147

The platoon marching in line to break it by twos or by

   fours at the same gait . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   149

The platoon marching in column by twos or by fours, to

   form it at the same gait . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  149

The platoon marching in line, to break it by fours or by

   twos, in doubling the gait . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .150

The platoon marching in column by twos or by fours, to

   form it in doubling the gait . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  151

Movements by fours, the platoon being in column

    or line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  152

ARTICLE IV. Running at the heads and pistol practice . . . . . . .154

To leap the ditch and the fence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156

To charge by platoon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .156

Rallying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   157

Skirmishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   157

Prepare to fight on foot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163            

 

SCHOOL 0F THE SQUADRON, MOUNTED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166

ARTICLE I.--Successive alignment of platoons in the squadron 168

            Alignment of the squadron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  169
            The squadron being In line, to form a column of
                fours
. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   170
            To break the squadron to the right or left to
                march to the front
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .170
            To break by fours from the right to march to the
                left .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   171
            Direct march in column of fours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
            Change of direction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  172
            Individual oblique march . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  173
            The squadron marching in column of fours to
                march to the rear
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  173

To break by fours to the right, column half left,

                (right or half right) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  173

The squadron marching in column by fours, by twos, and

    by file, to form line faced to the front,

    to the left, to the right, or to the rear  . . . . . . . . . . . . 174     

To regulate the rapidity of gaits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  177         

Sabre exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   177        

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS.

            Page.

ARTICLE II—The squadron being in line, to form it in open
                  column .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  178
              To march in open column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
              Changes of direction by successive wheels  . . . . . . . . 181
              Individual oblique march . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   181
              Change of gait in open column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   182
              To break by fours, by twos, and by file, to form
                  twos, fours, and platoons at the same gait
. . . . . . . 182
              The same movements in doubling the gait . . . . . . . . . 185
              The squadron marching in open column to march
                  to the rear
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186
              To halt the column . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  187
              The squadron marching in open column to form
                  line faced to the left, to the right, to the front,
                  and to the rear
 . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . 188
               To break by platoons to the front . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
               To break by platoons to the rear from the right,
                   to march to the left
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   192
               Movement by fours, the squadron being in open
                   column                       
 
ARTICLE III—Direct march of the squadron in line . . . . . . . . . . 194
              Countermarch . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  197
               Wheelings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   198
              To wheel on a fixed pivot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  198
              To wheel on a movable pivot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200
              Individual oblique march . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . .  201
              Oblique march by platoons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202
              The squadron being in line, to cause it to gain
                   ground to the rear, and to face it again to the
                   front, by fours . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  . . . . . .  . .  . 203
              The squadron marching in line to march it to the
                   rear by wheeling the platoons about
. . . . . . . . . . .  203
              The squadron marching is line, to break it to the
                   front, by platoons, and to reform it
. . . . . . . . . . . .. 204
              The same movement in doubling the gait . . . . . . . . . . 205 

Passage of obstacles . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .   206

ARTICLE IV—The Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207

Rallying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  210

Skirmishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  213

To fight on foot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  217

 


INTRODUCTION.

 

To the Adjutant General U. S. Army:

I report that, in obedience to orders, I have pre­pared regulations for the instruction. formations, and movements of the cavalry of the army and volun­teers of the United States.

In undertaking this important work I wanted to give much consideration to a growing military im­pression in favor of an important change to a single rank formation.

Whilst the conservatism or prejudices of European establishments have slowly yielded, in the infantry arm, to the extent of reducing its formation from six to two ranks, the one great step from two to one rank in cavalry has not yet been made; but it was tested very successfully in the war in Portugal in 1833—’34 in a British legion. I found that it greatly simplified all cavalry movements; a great recommendation,— but especially in view of our national policy; it would go far toward lessening the difficulties, by many considered insuperable, of the efficient instruction of volunteer cavalry in a period of actual war.

Prejudices of my own against the change were overcome.

Adopting, then, the single rank formation, my work of revision became one of construction; and I


2        lNTRODUCTION.

 

have freely chosen what I judged to be the best points in the systems of France, Russia, Prussia, Austria, and England. I have added to all. The work will be found to amplify the old range of movements, whilst its simplicity renders it less vol­uminous.

In the decisive action of cavalry the rear rank, under another name, will be screened from much of the enemy’s fire; will be reserved from the confusion which even success throws into the front rank; but that rank defeated, it not only escapes being in­volved, but is close at hand to profit by the impres­sion which may have been made on the enemy.

My confidence in a single rank system is further strengthened by its recommendation in the able work of Captain Geo. B. McClellan, and by which I have been much assisted.

Respectfully,

P.ST. GEO. COOKE,

Colonel 2d Dragoons.

WASHINGTON, January 11, 1860.

 

 

 

CAVALRY TACTICS.

______

 

TITLE FIRST.

 

BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

______

 

ARTICLE FIRST.

 

FORMATION OF A REGIMENT OF TEN

SQUADRONS IN LINE.

 

In all parades and exercises the companies will be desig­nated as squadrons.

The squadrons of a regiment in line are posted with Intervals equal to a platoon front between the sergeants on their flanks; the intervals are equal at any one time, and never less than 12 paces. When the average of platoon front is much above this, the Colonel announces the in­creased uniform interval.

The squadrons are distinguished by the denomination of first, second, third, &c., counting from right to left; they retain these designations in the evolutions whatever may be their relative positions But the 1st Captain commands the squadron on the right; the 2d, the tenth (on the left;) the 3d, the fifth from the right; the 4th, the third from the right; the 5th, the seventh from the right; the 6th,

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

the second from the right; the 7th, the ninth from the right; the 8th, the sixth from the right; the 9th, the fourth from the right; and the 10th, the eight from the. right

This is the habitual and parade order of the squadrons; but in sudden formations they will take post as they ar­rive at the place of assembly ; and should a Captain be permanently absent, or absent for a campaign, the Commander of the regiment will assign his squadron position according to the rank of the actual commander.

The formation is in one rank

Each squadron is composed of two, three, or four platoons, according to its size. When of 40 or more files, it Is divided into four platoons; of 30 to 40 files, into three platoons; of 20 to 30 tiles, into two. If possible, the files of the platoons are of even number. The third and fourth platoons are made the largest if necessary to accomplish this. The platoons are numbered at first from right to left, and retain their numerical designations whatever relative positions they may subsequently occupy.

That which has been prescribed for the formation mounted is applicable to the formation on foot.

 

Posts of the Officers and Non-commissioned Officers of the field and Staff of a regiment in line.

 

The Colonel 50 paces in front of the centre of the regiment, having a chief trumpeter behind him.

The Lieutenant Colonel 25 paces in advance of the centre of the right wing.

The 1st Major 25 paces in advance of the centre of the left wing

The 2d Major 25 paces in advance of the centre of the regiment.

The Colonel moves wherever his presence may be necessary.

The Lieutenant Colonel and Majors move wherever the Colonel may think proper to direct them.


 

 

BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

The Adjutant accompanies the Colonel.

The Regimental Quartermaster is 2 paces to the right of the sergeant major, or accompanies the Colonel, as he may direct.

The sergeant major is in line with the regiment 2 paces from the right flank.

The quartermaster sergeant is in line with the regiment 2 paces from the left flank.

The standard bearer is on the right of the guidon of the centre, or right centre squadron; a corporal is 1 pace behind him.

The regimental marker is 1 pace behind the second file from the right of the regiment

General Staff Officers serving with the regiment 25 paces In rear of the right of the regiment.

The band, formed in two ranks, is 25 paces in rear of the centre of the regiment

 

Post of the Officers and Non-commissioned Officers of a Squadron in line.

 

The Captain is posted In front of the centre of the squadron, the croup of his horse 4 paces in advance of the heads of the horses in line.

The Senior Lieutenant commands the 1st platoon; the next in rank, the 4th platoon; the next, the 2d; and the next, the 3d.  Each is posted in front of the centre of his platoon, with the croup of his horse 1 pace in advance of the heads of the horses In line. Sergeants supply the places of commanders of platoons, when there are not enough officers present.

The 1st sergeant is posted on the right of the squadron not counted in the rank; he is the squadron right guide.

The next sergeant In rank is posted on the left of the squadron, not counted in the rank; he is the squadron left gulde.

The third sergeant In rank is the guldon bearer, and is the left file of the 2d platoon.

 

 

 

BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

The other sergeants and corporals are placed according to rank, as follows:

Left of 1st platoon.

Right of 4th platoon.

Right of 3d platoon.

Right of 1st platoon.

Left of 4th platoon.

Left of 3d platoon.

Right of 2d platoon.

The 1st trumpeter is posted one pace behind the 4th file from the right of the 1st platoon.

The other trumpeter, one pace behind the 4th file from the left of the 4th platoon.

The farrier, one pace behind the centre of the second platoon.

The sadler, one pace behind the centre of the third platoon.

There is a size-roll of the squadron, and with some allow­ance for weight of man and horse, the tallest horses are assigned to the tallest men; the men are posted according to this roll, the tallest men to the right and left of the centre, the lowest at the flanks.

This invariable position of the soldiers is also important, for its encouragement to companionship and mutual assist­ance in the sets of fours, and to a feeling of responsibility of each to the others in conduct and bravery.

 

 

Assembly of a Regiment Mounted.

 

When a regiment is to mount boots and saddles is sounded. At this signal the horses are saddled, bridled, and fully equipped for the occasion.

At the signal to horse, non-commissioned officers and troopers lead into rank. The 1st sergeant calls the roll, or the sergeants of divisions may be required to call the division rolls; the officers are present in superintendence.

The Captain then, or the senior Lieutenant by his order,

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

orders the squadron to count fours in each platoon, and to mount.

The Captain, first observing that every one is In his prescribed place, and the general appearance of the squadron, marches it, habitually by fours, to the place of assembly. If required, on reaching there he reports absentees, by his 1st sergeant, to the Adjutant.

In case of alarm or surprise, to horse is sounded; the men then saddle, pack up, bridle, and mount with the utmost celerity, and repair to the place of assembly, which is always previously designated.

On occasions of parade, the trumpeters and band will proceed, as soon as mounted, to the right of the parade ground, and be there formed In two or more ranks. Fifteen minutes after to horse, the trumpeters sound the assembly, for marching the squadrons to the parade.

 

Assembly of a Regiment Dismounted.

 

When a regiment is to turn out under arms on foot, “to arms” will be sounded; at this signal the squadrons will be formed and inspected as prescribed

For parade, the regiment will be formed in line of columns, as when mounted, but with intervals of two paces.

The squadron officers will take place four paces in front of the first platoons, in order of rank from right to left, with equal intervals; the left guides on the right of the second platoons.

 

 

DRESS PARADE AND GUARD MOUNTING.

 

Dress parade and mounting of guards, mounted, are con­ducted as prescribed in Army Regulations, with the following and other more obvious variations, necessary from the difference of cavalry and infantry.

The officers take post 12 paces, the non-commissioned officers 6 paces, in front of the guard.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

After inspection the officers take post 2 paces in front of the centre of their guard or their platoons; a non-commis­sioned officer commanding a guard the same.

The guard passes in review by guard, platoons, or fours, having regard to its strength.

In wet weather the sabres will not be drawn by guards for inspection, or any occasion of ceremony

At regimental parade the field officers and captains are placed as in line; the platoon commanders, exclusively commissioned officers, are aligned on the captains; the ad­jutant and sergeant major are posted 4 paces from the right and left of the line; 1st sergeants take post as right guides of squadrons.

After the music, the Adjutant rides to a point 25 paces In front of the centre of the line, faces it, and commands:

 

1.          Attention.

 2.          Draw—SABRE.

 3.          Present—SABRE.

 

The Colonel concludes the exercises with, Return—SABRE. The commands for the advance of the line of officers are given in a tone only loud enough to be heard by them.

If the Colonel desires it, for the purpose of parade, he will divide the squadron into two platoons, and form the regimental parade in line of platoon columns at 9 paces distance—from the horse’s croups in the front line to their heads in the other—with intervals of 6 paces.

The officers take post 4 paces In front of the first platoons, in order of rank, from right to left, with equal intervals; if but one officer, in front of the centre of the platoon; left guides on the right of the 2d platoons.

To leave the parade, the squadrons will be commanded:

1.  Right forward—Fours right. 2. MARCH. Or, if by the rear, I Fours left—Columns left. 2. MARCH. In both cases the rear platoon does not march until the leading platoon has gained sufficient ground for their properly uniting.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

THE STANDARD.

Generally, when the standard Is used, the standard bearer goes for it to the quarters or tent of the Colonel, escorted by two sergeants.

On special occasions, and at least once a year, it Is escort­ed and received with ceremony.

Two platoons of the standard squadron, or one of the flank squadrons, will be detached, under the orders of the Colonel, to proceed to his quarters, as soon as mounted. It will be halted in their front in column of platoons, with either flank toward the quarters. The standard bearer re­ceives the standard from the hands of the adjutant or ser­pent major, and takes his post In the centre of the interval between the platoons, with a sergeant on each side of him; the column Is then put in motion, preceded 20 paces by a chief trumpeter and four trumpeters.

The column approaches a flank of the regiment, march­ing parallel with and about 100 paces from its front, the trumpets sounding the march.

The Colonel commands the sabres to be drawn. The es­cort is halted when nearly opposite the dank, the standard-bearer and two sergeants pm on, and when 60 paces In front of the Colonel face him and the regiment and halt.

The Colonel then orders sabres presented, and presents sabre himself; the trumpets sound to the standard. The standard hearer then takes his place in line.

The escort, the moment the standard bearer leaves it, turns and is marched by the rear to its place in line.

When there is a band It may be substituted for the chief trumpeter and four trumpeters.

On the return of the standard it has the same escort.

 

Salute with the Standard.

 

When the standard is to pay honors, the standard bearer salutes in the following manner, in two times:

1.At 4 paces from the person who is to be saluted.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

lower the lance gently to the front, bending as near to the horizontal line as possible.

2. Raise the lance gently when the person saluted has passed 4 paces.

 

Salute with the Sabre.

 

When the superior and other officers are to salute, whether on horseback or on foot, at a halt or marching, they do it in four times.

1.    At 4 paces from the person to be saluted, raise the sabre perpendicularly, the point upwards, the edge to the left, the hand opposite to and one foot from the right shoulder, the elbow 6 inches from the body.

2.    Lower the blade, extending the arm to Its full length, the hand in quarte, until the point of the sabre is near the foot.

3.    Raise the sabre quickly, the point upwards, as in the first time, after the person saluted has passed 4 paces.

4.    Carry the sabre to the shoulder.

 

 

THE ORDER OF BATTLE.

 

The order of battle for a regiment of ten squadrons is the four right or left squadrons deployed in line; the four squadrons of the other flank in line of squadron columns 300 paces in rear of the first line. The 5th squadron, In column of platoons, generally left in front, is 50 paces be­hind the right flank of the first line, the line of its left guides being a platoon front to the right of the extremity of that flank the 6th squadron, in column of platoons, right in front, similarly disposed to the rear of the left flank of the first line.

If a squadron be absent, the second line will he composed of 3 squadrons, in columns immediately in rear of the first line; the 5th and 6th squadrons, counting from the flank which composes the first line, being always the flanking squadrons.


 

 

 

BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

The Lieutenant Colonel commands the second line, and is posted 25 paces in front of its centre.

The order of battle for a regiment of eight squadrons is as follows:

The six right or left squadrons deployed in line; the 7th and 8th (or 1st and 2d) squadrons are placed in columns of platoons, in rear of the right and left flanks of the line of battle, as described for the flank squadrons of the regiment of ten squadrons.

In the order of battle each field officer is attended by a trumpeter,

To change from line or order of review to order of battle in an eight squadron regiment, the 7th and 8th squadrons are wheeled by platoons (or by fours) to the right, and conducted by the shortest lines to their positions,

In a ten squadron regiment, the same for the 5th and 6th squadrons; the Lieutenant Colonel takes command of the next four squadrons, wheels platoons right, column right, and to the left, after marching the proper distance to the rear.

 

ARTICLE SECOND.

 

FORMATION OF A REGIMENT IN COLUMN,

 

Order in Column by twos or by fours.

 

In this order the squadrons preserve distances of 3 paces more than platoon front, counting from the croups of the horses of the last set of fours of one to the heads of the horses of the first set of the next.

The Colonel marches at the centre of the regiment, on the side of the guides, 50 paces from the flank of the column, having behind him a chief bugler.  He moves wherever his presence may be necessary.

The Lieutenant Colonel on the side of the guides, 25

 

 

 

 

BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

paces from the flank of the column; he marches habitually on a line with the Captain commanding the 1st squadron.

The 1st Major marches 25 paces from the same flank of the column, and on a line with the Captain commanding the 10th squadron.

The 2d Major marches 25 paces from the opposite flank, on a line with the centre of the column.

The Adjutant and Regimental Quartermaster accompany the Colonel.

The Sergeant Major marches on the side of the guides, 2 paces from the flank of the column, and on a line with the first files of the column.

The Quartermaster Sergeant marches on the side of the guides, 2 paces from the flank of the column, on a line with the last files of the column.

The regimental marker marches on the side opposite to the guides, 2 paces from the flank, and on a line with the first files of the column,

The Captains march on the side of the guides, and 8 paces from the flank and abreast of the centre of their squadrons.

The 1st Lieutenant of each squadron marches at the head of the 1st platoon, 1 pace in advance of the first flies, having the right guide on his right.

The chiefs of the other platoons march on the aide of the guides, 1 pace from the flank of the column, and abreast of their first files; the trumpeters march on the side oppo­site to the guides, 1 pace from the flank, and on a line with the second file from the front and rear of their squadrons; the farrier and the saddler in the direction of the trumpeters, and opposite the ccntres of the second and third platoons.

They all march in a similar manner on the flanks of the column when the left is in front; and, in this case, it is the commander of the 4th platoon who marches at its head and in front of the squadron columns; and the let Major is near the head of the regimental column.

The left guide marches behind the last files of the squad­ron; when the column is left in front, he takes post on the

 

 


 

BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

left of the officer commanding the 4th platoon, 1 pace in front of the left file.

When the nature of the ground obliges the officers and others to enter the column, the movement is made succes­sively; the superior officers and others opposite the 1st divisions of squadrons place themselves at their head; those opposite the 2d divisions, in rear.

The primitive order is resumed as soon as the nature of the ground will permit.

 

Order in column of Platoons, (open column.)

 

In this order the squadrons preserve distances of 2 pla­toon fronts, less one pace between each other, counting from the platoon horses; the distance of one platoon from another, measured from the forefeet of the horses of one platoon to those of the next, is equal to the front of the platoons.

The Colonel marches at the centre of the regiment, on the aide of the guides, 50 paces from the flank of the column, having behind him a chief trumpeter; he moves wherever his presence may he required.

The Lieutenant Colonel marches habitually on the side of the guides 25 paces from the flank of the column, and on a line with the Lieutenant commanding the 2d platoon of the 1st squadron.

The 1st Major marches at the same distance from the same flank, on a line with the commander of the last pla­toon; the 2d Major the same distance from the opposite flank on a line with the centre of the column.

The Adjutant and Regimental Quartermaster accompany the Colonel.

The sergeant major marches on the aide of the guides 2 paces from the flank of the column, and abreast of the leading platoon.

The quartermaster sergeant marches on the side of the guides 2 paces from the flank of the rear platoon.

The regimental marker marches one pace in rear of the second file of the leading platoon on the side of the guides.


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

The Captains march on the side of the guides 8 paces from the flank of the column, and habitually abreast of the centre of their squadrons.

The commanders of platoons march one pace in front of their centres; those of leading platoons are answerable for the distance to the squadron in front.

When the column marches right in front, the right guide of each squadron marches on the right of the first platoon, and the left guide one pace behind the 2d file from the left of the 4th platoon. The posts of these sergeants is the re­verse when the left is in front.

The trumpeters, farrier, and saddler march in rear of their platoons as in the squadron in line.

The squadron being composed of 64 files, when it is broken into sections, the chief of the leading platoon marches at the head of the leading section; the chiefs of the other platoons one pace from and on a line with their leading section, and on the side of the guides. The second sections will he commanded by their guides, who retain their places.

 

Order in close Column.

 

The regiment is in column of squadrons at platoon dis­tance; the distances are equal at any one time, and never less than 9 paces, (from the croups of the horses of one squadron to the heads of the horses of the next.)

The Colonel is posted 25 paces from the centre of the column at the side of the guides.

The Lieutenant Colonel and 1st Major march habitually on the side of the guides, 12 paces from the flanks of the first and last squadrons.

The 2d Major 12 paces from the centre of the column on the aide opposite the guides.

The sergeant major, quartermaster sergeant, and regi­mental marker march as in column of platoons.

All the members of the squadrons are posted as in line except the Captains, who march on the side of the guides

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

4 paces from the flank, and on a line with the chiefs of the platoons.

When the guide is centre, “side of the guides” will mean the left flank of a column right in front; the right flank if left in front.

The order in open column of squadrons (or of attack) is the same as in close column, except the Captains; they are posted as in line.

 

Order in double Columns.

 

The Colonel marches at the head of the column.

The Lieutenant Colonel marches abreast the centre of the right column 25 paces distant.

The 1st Major marches abreast the centre of the left column 25 paces distant; the 2d Major behind the Lieu­tenant Colonel, abreast the rear of the right column.

The Captains of each column on the outer flanks.

The left squadron guides of the right column on the left of fist platoons; the right squadron guides of the left column on the right of fourth platoons.

All others the same as in column of platoons.

 

COMPLIMENTS BY CAVALRY UNDER REVIEW.

 

The regiment being in line, the Colonel commands:

 

1. Attention.

2. Prepare for Review.

 

At this command, the commanders of platoons advance 3paces, to the line of squadron commanders; the Adju­tant proceeds to the right of the regiment, and places himself 2 paces to the right of the sergeant major, who Is on the right of the line without interval; the regimental quartermaster is 2 paces to the left of the quartermaster sergeant, who is on the left of the line without interval. The left officers place themselves on the right of the rank of squadron officers, according to their relative rank, and with Intervals of 1 pace.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

The band and trumpeters on a line, each in one or two ranks, according to their strength—the band on the right— at the right of the regiment, with an interval of 12 paces.

The Colonel then commands:

1.  Attention.

2.  Draw—SABRE.

3.  Right—DRESS.

 4.  FRONT.

In this parade order, the regiment awaits the approach of the personage who is to review it; for whose guidance a camp-color will have been placed one hundred to two hun­dred paces in front of the centre, according to the extent of the line and the plain in front of it.

When the reviewing personage is midway between the camp color and the Colonel, the latter turns his horse to the right-about on his ground, and commands:

1.          Present—SABRE.

And resumes immediately his proper front. The officers all salute.

When the reviewing personage, who has halted until the proper compliments are paid, advances, the Colonel brings his sabre to a carry turns about as before to the line, and commands:

1.         Carry—SABRE.

When the whole line remains perfectly steady, the Colonel resuming his proper front.

The reviewing personage now turns off to the right of the regiment, passes thence, in front of all the officers, to the left, around the left, and by the rear to the right again. While he is passing around the regiment, no matter what his rank, the music will play; and when he turns off to take his station near the camp-color, the music will cease.

The reviewing personage having taken a position near the camp-color, previously placed at a proper distance, the Colonel causes the regiment to break into column right in front by platoon or squadron. The band and trumpeters

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

each wheel at the same time, the latter closing upon the former; (this will be the habitual formation of the music.)

The position of the Colonel In column of review is 6 paces in front of the Captain of the first squadron, or offi­cer commanding the leading platoon; the Adjutant and regimental quartermaster are on his left.

Staff officers in one rank, according to precedence, from right to left 6 paces in rear of the column.

The field officers are 6 paces from the flank opposite the guides; the Lieutenant Colonel opposite the leading divi­sion; the 1st Major that In rear, and the 2d Major the central one.

The sergeant major and quartermaster sergeant 2 paces from the flank opposite the guides; the former opposite the leading division; the latter the rear.

In a column of platoons, the Captains 4paces from the flank opposite the guides, opposite the centres of their squadrons

Chiefs of platoons 1 pace In advance of the centres of their platoons.

The column is then put in march, at a walk, with the guide right.

The Adjutant places the regimental marker at the second turn, so that the right flank of the column shall pass 6 paces from the reviewing personage.

The column first passes at a walk, and afterward, if re­quired, at a trot,

When the head of the column arrives within 50 paces of the reviewing personage, the music commences to play.

The music having passed, the chief bugler causes it to turn out of the column, so as to take a position facing the reviewing personage, and about 12 paces from the flank of the column. It continues to play until the rear of the column has passed; it then wheels, and follows in rear.

Passing at a walk, the Colonel and all the officers salute with the sabre as they successively arrive within 6 paces of the reviewing personage, turning the heads towards him.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

The standard does not salute, except to the President or Vice-President of the United States, Governors of States, Heads of Departments, or the Commander-in-Chief; when the trumpets are to flourish In passing, the band ceases playing, and resumes the same air or march when the flourishes have ceased.

Arrived near its original ground, the Colonel changes the guide of the column; on the ground, he halts it, and forms line; otherwise he commands the trot, and passes the re­viewing officer again. In this ease the band will have re­tained its place near the reviewing personage, and will commence to play at the approach of the head of the column, wheel in front of it, and thus march off.

The officers now do not salute; and the Colonel marches on the left of the column.

The regiment being formed in line on its original ground— en inspection is not to follow—theColonel marches the regi­ment forward in line, at the walk or trot, regulating upon the standard squadron, and halts it 50 yards from the re­viewing personage. The instant the line is motionless, all the officers, taking their time from the Colonel, salute with the Sabre. This advance of the regiment is omitted when other troops are included.

When there are two or more regiments, the column being in motion, the regiments will take 60 paces distance one from another.

The Brigadier General will place himself 10 paces in front of the leading Colonel, his staff officers on his left; the music of that regiment 20 paces in front of the Brigadier General.

The Colonels do not leave their places in the column.

 

Forms and course of Inspection.

 

The regiment being in line, the Colonel causes the squad­rons to wheel to the right.

The Colonel seeing the squadrons aligned, commands:

1.  Officers and Non-Commissioned officers to the front of your

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

squadrons. 2. MARCH. The officers take places in one rank, 12 paces, and the non-commissioned officers in one rank, 6 paces in advance, along the whole front of their respective squadrons, in the order of rank, the highest on the right; the trumpeters at the same time take post on the alignment of the squadron, 6 paces from the right, and the farrier and saddler one pace on their left, and one pace apart.

Seeing the last order in a train of execution, the Colonel commands: 1 Field and Staff to the front. 2. MARCH. The commissioned officers thus designated form themselves In one rank, 12 paces in front of the officers of the 1st squadron, in the following order, beginning on the right: Lieutenant-Colonel, Majors, Adjutant, Quartermaster, Sur­geon, and Assistant Surgeon. The non-commissioned staff in a similar manner, 6 paces in rear of the preceding rank. The standard hearer will take post in the centre of this rank. The band is formed in one rank, 12 paces in rear of the column,

The Colonel now takes poet on the right of the Lieu­tenant-Colonel, but such of the field officers as may he superior in rank to the Inspector do not take post as above.

The inspection commences in front. After inspecting the dress and general appearance of the field and commissioned staff, the Inspector, accompanied by these officers, passes down the column, looking at each squadron in front and in rear, with a view to the same objects. He afterwards, in a like manner, passes and inspects the arms; as he successively approaches each squadron, its Captain com­mands:

1.         Attention.

2.         Inspection—Arms,

which is executed as prescribed, No. 72.

If, then, the Inspector wishes to make a particular inspec­tion of equipage, ammunition, &c., the Colonel commands:

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

1.  Attention.

2.  Non-Commissioned Officers—To TOUR P0STS.

3.  PREPARE TO DISMOUNT.

4.  DISMOUNT.

At the third command numbers one and three, through­out the squadrons, ride forward 6 paces, dressing by the right the trumpeters move forward with the numbers one and three, and take position in front of the farrier and saddler, who stand fast.

The regiment being dismounted, the non-commissioned staff without changing position, the Captains command:

1. Right—DRESS. 2. FRONT. The ranks in front and rear carefully preserve the interval between the files.

The Inspector having inspected the non-commissioned staff, the Captains, as he approaches each squadron, com­mand: 1. Attention. 2. Open—Boxes.

As the inspection of each squadron is completed thu Colonel may dismiss it from the parade; two platoons escorting the standard.

 

 

 

ARTICLE THIRD.

 

DUTIES OF INSTRUCTORS.

 

The Colonel is responsible for the instruction of the regi­ment, and he shall not change, under any pretext, the dis­positions contained in this book.

He will be present, as often as his other duties permit, at the theoretical and practical instructions, and especially at that of the officers assembled together.

The Lieutenant-Colonel and Major are especially charged with the supervision of the instruction of their respective wings.

Individual instruction being the basis of the instruction of squadrons, on which that of a regiment depends, and

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.       

 

the first principles having the greatest influence upon this individual instruction, the classes of recruits should he watched with the greatest care.

  The instructors place themselves habitually at such a distance that they can see their whole troop at a glance, and make themselves distinctly heard by it They leave their places as seldom as possible, and only to make the corrections which are indispensable in the position of the men and the execution of the movements

  They repeat, in a few clear and precise words, the explan­ations which have not been well understood

  They should often join example to precept, should keep up the attention of the men by an animated tone, and pass to another movement as soon as that which they command has been executed in a satisfactory manner They should not he too exacting at first as to precision and unity.

  The instructor should sometimes question the men, to test their attention to his words; and when at rest, to sat­isfy himself that the lesson is well understood.

 

 

 

 

ARTICLE FOURTH.

 

 

DIVISIONS ORDER, AND PROGRESSION OF INSTRUCTION.

 

As instruction cannot be established on a solid basis without joining theory to practice, there is in each regi­ment a theoretical instruction, independent of the exer­cises in the field

  The Colonel assembles the officers once a week, or oftener, if he deem it necessary, for the theory of the dif­ferent parts of their instruction.

  The Captains assemble, in a like manner, their sergeants and corporals; a selection of privates is included.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

Instruction.

 

Each drill lasts one hour and ten minutes, including the rests; these should not exceed two minutes at a time.

 The horses of the trumpeters should not be excused from participating in the different classes of instruction.

All the horses must be exercised at least three times a week.

During the summer, and until the end of October, the regiment is exercised occasionally in the details of the ser­vice in war For this purpose the Colonel takes the regi­ment into the country, in order to accustom it to pass over all kinds of ground, and to apply the evolutions to the different localities.

  On these, and on other occasions, the Colonel will prac­tice all the officers of the regiment in judging distances; it is a point of much importance in the education of a cavalry officer.

When the regiment is assembled, the Colonel should direct the superior officers to command, occasionally, in the different evolutions, in order to judge of the progress of their instruction.

 

 

 

ARTICLE FIFTH.

 

GRADATION OF INSTRUCTION.

 

Recruits.

 

The recruit commences his instruction on foot. The first week after his arrival at the regiment is employed exclu­sively in instructing him in all the details of discipline, police, and interior service, and in those relating to his dress and the grooming of his horse.

  He is taught to mount without saddle on both sides of the horse.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

He Is taught the name and use of the principal parts of the arms and equipments, and the manner of keeping them clean; the manner of rolling the cloak, of folding the effects, and of placing them in the valise.

These different instructions are given by the corporal of the squad, under the superintendence of he sergeant and officer of the platoon.

At the end of this week, the recruit commences the fret lesson on foot; he continues to be instructed in the above-mentioned details.

The recruits are drilled on foot twice a day, when possible, an hour each time. Their instruction on horseback Is commenced at the same time with the sabre exercise.

 

Corporals.

 

The Corporals should be capable of executing all the lessons mounted and dismounted, and should be qualified to teach the school of the trooper dismounted, and at least 4 lessons mounted.

Their theoretical Instruction should include, In addition to these lessons, all the details relative to the functions of their grade in the interior service, both In garrison and in campaign.

 

Sergeants.

 

The sergeants should he capable of executing, dismounted and mounted, all that is prescribed by this book; and should he able to teach the lessons of the school of the trooper, and to command a platoon in the school of the squadron  mounted.

The theoretical instruction of the sergeants should in­clude the basis of instruction, the school of the trooper, the school of the platoon, and the school of the squadron; also, the regula­tions for the interior service in garrison and in campaign, so far as their grade is concerned.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

Officers.

 

  Every officer should be at least able to command accord­ing to his rank. No one will he considered fully instructed unless he can also explain and execute all that is contained in this book.

The theory of the officers should include this book and all the regulations which prescribe their duties in their different positions, either in peace or war.

If the faults committed on drill by an officer, of any rank whatsoever, arise from negligence or want of instruction, the Colonel of the regiment shall cause him to be imme­diately replaced.

 

__________

 

 

ARTICLE SIXTH.

 

INSTRUCTION TO MOUNT WITHOUT SADDLE,

 

AND TO SADDLE.

 

Manner of Vaulting.

 

Seize the mane with the left hand, hold the reins of the snaffle in the right hand, and place it on the withers, the thumb to the left, the fingers to the right; raise yourself by a spring on the two wrists, the body straight; pass the right leg extended over the croup of the horse, without touching him, and seat yourself on his back

To dismount, pass the left rein of the snaffle into the right hand; place this hand on the withers; seize the mane with the left hand, raise yourself on the two wrists, pass the right leg extended over the croup of the horse, without touching him, bringing the legs together, the body straight, and come to the ground lightly on the toes, bending the knees a little.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

Manner of rolling the Cloak.

 

  The cloak being entirely unfolded, the sleeves are laid flatand extended parallel to the two front edges of the cloak; each one is then turned up and folded near the elbow, so as to give a length of 3 feet 6 inches from one elbow to the other, the middle of the cloak remaining un­covered. The cape is then turned down over the sleeves, in such a manner that the front edges may exactly cover those of the cloak.

  The lower extremity of the cloak is turned up about 10 inches; the skirts are likewise turned towards each other, so that they may touch the fold of the sleeves, and that, being folded a second time upon themselves, they may give to the cloak the form of a rectangle; the lower extremity of the cloak is then turned up about 7 inches, and it is rolled as tightly as possible, commencing at the collar and pressing the knee upon it as it is rolled, to bold it. The part of the cloak which is rolled is then introduced into the sort of pocket formed by the part which was turned back.

 

Manner of Saddling.

 

Approach the horse on the left aide, and lay the blanket, folded into 6 thicknesses, on his back; the edges on the left aide.

Seize it, then, with the left hand on the withers, and with the right on the loins; slide it once or twice from front to rear, to smooth the hair, taking care to raise it in carrying it forward, so as not to brush up the hair.

  The blanket should be so arranged as to project one fin­ger a breadth beyond the bars in rear.

  Seize the saddle at the pommel with the left hand, at the cantle with the right hand, and place it gently on the horse’s back, bringing it from the direction of his croup, in order not to frighten him, and place it a little in rear, that the cropper may be put on without drawing it back. Let

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

down the girth, breaststrap, and crupper; step behind the horse, seize the tail with the left hand, and twist the hair around the dock with the right, which then seizes the crup­per and passes the tail through it, taking care that none of the hair remains under it, which would hurt the horse.

  Step to the right side of the horse, and, seizing the saddle at the cantle with the left hand, and at the pommel with the right hand, raise it and carry it forward, without moving the blanket; see, at the same time, that there are no straps caught under the saddle; place the girth fiat, and pass it through the loop of the false martingale; return to the left side by the head of the horse; run the left hand between the withers and the blanket; raise the blanket up a little so that it will not compress the withers; buckle the girth and the breast- strap.

 

___________

 

ARTICLE SEVENTH.

 

OF TRAINING HORSES WHICH HAVE BEEN ALREADY RIDDEN.

 

Whenever a horse resists or Is restive without an apparent cause the saddlery should be carefully examined, in order to see if any part hurts or tickles him. Mere force, and want of skill and coolness, tend to confirm vice and bad habits. Resistance in horses is often a work of vigor, and proceeds from high spirits; punishment would turn it into vice.

Rearing is a bad and dangerous habit; while the horse is up, the rider must yield the hand, and at the time he is coming down most vigorously determine him forward; if this is done at any other time, it may add a spring to his rearing, and make him come over. If this fail, he must be whipped by a person from behind.

Kicking can he prevented by holding the horse’s head

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

well up and closing the legs—if necessary, forcing him for­ward.

Starting sometimes proceeds from defect of sight; which, if only in one eye, can easily be ascertained. If from fear, the horse most be taken up to the object with great pati­ence and gentleness and be allowed to touch it with his lip. In no case should a horse be punished for timidity. The dread of chastisement will increase his fear of the object. But if a horse persistently turns back, he must be punished; always, however, while his head is away from the object. Finding that he only suffers while he is turned hack, and his head is away, he will desist.

  If a horse turns against a fence, and leans to it, turn his head to it, and not from it.

 

 

 

PREPARATORY LESSON,

 

To make a horse tractable and steady at Mounting

 

A first act of subjection, which may appear of little importance, will prove of great service; it makes. the horse quiet, gives him confidence, and the man such ascendancy that the horse from the outset is inclined to yield to the means employed to bring him under control. Two lessons of half an hour will suffice to execute this.

Go up to the horse, pat him on the neck, and speak to him; then taking the bit reins at a few inches from the rings with the left hand, place yourself so as to offer as much resistance as possible to the horse when he tries to break away; take the whip in the full of the right hand, with the point down, raise it quietly and tap the horse on the breast; on this he will naturally try to escape from the annoyance, and hack to avoid the whip; follow the horse, pulling at the same time against him, but without discon­tinuing the whip, in the same quiet way, showing no signs of anger, or any symptoms of yielding. The horse, soon tired of trying ineffectually to avoid the infliction by pulling

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

hack, will move towards you; you must then stop and make much of him. This repeated once or twice will prove wonderfully successful even in the first lesson. The horse, having found out how to avoid the punishment, will not wait for the application of the whip, but anticipate it, by moving op at the slightest gesture; this will be of great assistance in the subsequent bending lessons, as also of great use in mounting and dismounting, and much accelerate the training of the horse.

 

To bend or supple the Horses neck.

 

The balance of the horse’s body and his lightness in hand depend on time proper carriage of the head and neck, and to these two points attention must first, and chiefly, be directed. They should always precede and prepare the horse by their attitude for every movement about to be executed; and the rider has little power over the animal until he has rendered both these points susceptible of every impulse communicated by him.

The homes, with the curb bridle on, are formed in line, at two paces apart, their riders standing at their heads, preparatory to the first bending lesson with the bit.

A young horse generally attempts to resist the bit, either by bending his neck to a inside, setting his jaw against it, carrying his nose high up or low down. We must there­fore render him manageable by teaching him to bring his head to position, and arching his neck on the reins being felt. And it will be found in a short time that horses that required the whole strength of a man’s arm to make them obey the action of the bit will bend to the slightest feeling of the veins for, finding that they cannot resist the power of the bit used in the manner hereafter shown, their in­stinct will teach them to obey, and habit accustom them to time impulse received from the rider.

As a general rule, in all the ensuing bending lessons, when a horse champs the bit, it is a sign that he no longer resists the action of the hand; then make much of him,

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.    

 

and allow him to resume his natural position. It Is of the utmost importance that the horse never be allowed to take the initiative. Always oppose the raising of the horse’s head—always lower your hands and bring it down.

See that the bit is properly placed in the horses mouth, and the curb-chain so that you can pass your finger under it; place yourself on the near side close to the horse’s neck and facing his head, the feet a little apart to give you more power.

  Take the off bit rein in the full of the right band, close up, with the ring of the bit between the forefinger and thumb; the near rein in the same way with the left hand, thumb nails toward each other, and the little fingers out­wards; bring the right hand towards the body, extending the left one from you at the same time, so as to turn the horse’s head to the right. The strength employed must be gradual, and proportioned to the resistance met with, taking care at first not to bring the horse’s nose too much in, or too close to his chest, which would make the bend very difficult; if the horse backs, continue the pressure until he, finding it impossible to escape from the restraint imposed upon him by the bit held thus crossways in his mouth, stands still and yields to it.

When the bend is complete, the horse will hold his head there without any restraint and champ the bit; then make much of him, and allow him to resume gently his natural position, but not to throw his head rotund hurriedly. Practice this in the same manner to the left.

This lesson not only teaches the horse to follow the indi­cation of the rein to both hands, hut also to yield his under jaw to the pressure of the bit, the advantage of which will soon become apparent. And now, before mounting, pre­pare the horses to rein in.

For this purpose cross the snaffle reins behind the horse’s jaw, taking the near rein in the right hand, and the off rein in the left, at about six inches from the ring, and draw them across each other till the horse gives way to the pressure and “reins in.” Do not forget to oppose the

 

 

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

raising of the horse’s head by lowering your hands and bringing it down again. When the horse gives way to the cross pressure of the snaffle ease your hand and make much of him.

The Instructor now orders the men to mount, and then to bend the horses’ heads to the right and left. The reins being properly adjusted in the left hand to bend the horse’s head to the right, seize the right rein with the right hand well down, so as to have the reins short on the off aide. Then draw them quietly towards you till you get the horse’s head completely round to the right, in the same position as in the bend dismounted. When the horse champs the bit make much of him, and allow him to resume his natural position

When bending the horse’s head to the left, pass the right hand over the left one, seize the left rein and draw the horse’s head gently to the left.

Next teach the horse to rein up, arch his neck, bring his nose into proper position, and there remain steady until the rider loosens the reins. At the word rein in your horses lower the bridle hand as much as possible, and turn It so that the back shall be uppermost with the right hand— nails down—take hold of the curb reins close to the left, and shorten them by degrees, drawing them through the left, which closes on the reins each time they are shortened.

When the horse resists much, and holds his nose up, keep the reins steady; do not shorten them, nor lengthen them: close the legs to prevent the horse from hacking; he will remain perhaps a minute, or more, with his nose up, and his jaw set against the bit; hut will then yield, bring his nose in, and champ the bit; make much of him with the right hand, loosen the reins, and, after a few seconds, rein him in again.

The horse will thus learn to bring his head into position whenever you feel the reins, and this practice gives him confidence; for most young horses are afraid of the bit, and If frightened at first by any sudden jerk of the reins will not after go kindly “up to the hand.” or let you have that

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

degree of bearing which is requisite not only to the rider, as it forewarns him of what the horse is going to do, and whether he requires more collecting (which he does, if the hearing on the hand is too heavy,) or more freedom, (which Is requisite if the horse rises too much in his action,) but is also necessary to induce the horse to work boldly and well.

  Some horses are so shaped that they over do the reining in, and rest the lower jaw against the breast to counteract this, raise his head, by the use of the snaffle, whilst the leg drives him forward to the hand.

Some horses will not work up to the bit; that is, will not bear on it at all. Such a horse is unfit for cavalry duty; his paces can never be equal and steady; and in a melee or single combat he could turn to either side, or stop and go about, before his rider could prevent him.

 

How to teach a horse to obey the pressure of the leg.

 

On the word of command, circle to the right on the fore hand, the horse’s head remains straight to the front; apply the left leg well behind the girth very quietly, and without touching with the spur; press against him until he takes a step to the right with his hind legs; take the leg from him, and make much of him; then repeat the same, and get another step from him, and so on until be has turned about, always pausing at the half turn. The horses fore legs remain steady, and his hind quarters circle round his fore. At first the men may, if necessary, assist themselves by feeling the rein on the same side, and touching the horse very lightly with the whip close to where the leg is applied. The spur may also be used if necessary, with a sudden and somewhat decided thrust; but not frequently, and never with a steady pressure, for, instead of yielding to it, the horse will soon begin to press against it.

Circle to the left on the fore hand on the same principle. It must be an invariable role never to hurry a horse in his bending lessons.

By degrees, as the horse improves in this lesson and steps

 

 

BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

freely from the pressure of the leg, let the rider, at the word, circle to the right on the fore hand, pass the right hand down, shortening the off rein, and bend the horses head a little to the right, so that he may see his hind quarters coming round; apply the left leg as usual;should the horse not answer the pressure, use the reins on the same side with the leg, and resume the opposite rein the moment the horse yields.

All this must be done gradually, for if you bend the horses head round as far as it can go, and attempt thus to circle him the first time, he will resist, finding it too difficult; but if done by degrees, he will soon come to it.

The leg opposite the one which presses the hind quar­ters to circle round the fore must he kept close to the horse, to assist in keeping him in his place, by communicating a forward impulse, whilst the other leg communicates the impulse, which makes the horse step from right to left, or left to right; and in order that the pressure of the one shall not counteract the effect of the other, the leg applied to make the horse step to either hand should be further behind the girth than the leg used to keep him up to hand. Both legs should he close to the horse at all times, the pressure on either side being increased as occasion requires.

At first dismounted men are useful with the unsteady horses, by taking hold of the curb reins on the opposite side to that which the horse is to step to, and thus assist­ing the rider, who then only uses the snaffle; hut all extra­neous assistance should be as much as possible avoided.

  The instructor now exercises the horses in the riding house, trotting out to both hands. The hits should not be used much the first few days; but the horses brought by degrees to bear slightly on it. Ride them in the circles; trot them at a collected pace; walk and trot again; walk, halt, and make the men bend their horses to the hand they are working to.

Explain to the men that the horse’s head and neck must always he bent the way he is to go, and prepare the ani­mal by their attitude for all turns, circles, &c,; and when.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

ever they feel the curb reins, and the horse does not yield to them, let them keep the bridle hand steady, and play with the snaffle rein until the horse champs the bit. The snaffle should be continually used to prevent the horse from leaning on the hand.

Go through the bending lessons on foot and mounted, and then file home.

No lesson with young horses should exceed three quar­ters of an hour.

 

CIRCLING ON THE HAUNCHES.

 

A few minutes being devoted to the dismounted bending lessons, mount and begin by reining the horses in, bending them, and circling them to the right and left on the fore hand; this being done once or twice, proceed to the circling on the haunches.

By circling the horse on the forehand we have taught him, on applying the leg, to move his haunches to either hand; and as he has thus learnt to obey the leg, we can, by making use of it, prevent him from moving his hind legs to the right or left; therefore he will now be taught to circle on them, and in a few lessons he will be led to go completely round on his haunches, and thus in time per. form the pirouette —a very important accomplishment for the cavalry soldier; for when engaged, sword in hand, with an enemy, he can turn his horse right and left, and about in an instant, and thus gain the advantage over his antagonist. In a contest on horseback, it is not the strong­est, but the most skilful rider who is likely to he victori­ous.

At the command, On the haunches, right about, bend the horses head a little to the right with the bit, pass the right hand over, and take hold the near snaffle ruin, (not only as assistance to the horse, but to make the men sensible of the necessity of using the outward rein in these movements; when the horse is broken in it will be suffi-

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

cient to carry the bridle hand to the side you wish to turn to,) apply the left leg behind the girth to keep the haunches steady; at the word March, make the horse step to the right with his fore feet, turning on his hind feet, by feeling the left snaffle rein, bringing both hands a little to the right at the same time, and applying the left leg, while keeping the horse up to the hand with the right leg.

At first the horse must be halted and made much of three or four times during each turn, and if his haunches are thrown out, they must be brought back again by applying the left leg; and thus gradually led on, the horse will learn to go about to both hands on his haunches without touching the ground with his fore feet.

Go through the trotting lesson, then form up and repeat the bending lessons on foot and mounted.

 

 

REINING BACK.

 

  In reining back the horse must be well in hand and well balanced;he can then make an equal use of all four legs, and raise them equally from the ground. Before reining back the horse should be square to the front, his head home, and light in hand; then apply both legs, retaining a steady feel of both reins to make the horse lift one of his hind legs.  It is at this moment that a double feeling of both reins will oblige him to recover his balance by stepping backwards.  Place him straight to the front by bringing his haunches to the right or left as may be required; then give him his head, and make much of him.

At first a few steps backward is all that should be required of a horse; if he bring his hind legs too much under him, ease the hand, and apply both legs to make him regain his balance forward; and for this reason always use the legs first, and then feel the reins; because if you feel the reins first, the horse throws his weight back;and the more weight ha throws on his hind legs the less able he is to lift them, which is a necessary preliminary to stepping back.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

The horse should never be allowed to hurry, or run back out of hand, or to diverge from the straight line.

The squad must be frequently halted during the walking, trotting, and bending lessons, to practice the reining back; and independently of the dressing, until all the horses rein back well.

Attention must now be directed to making the men keep their horses well up to the hit, and putting them together with the use of the hand and leg; to see that in all turns, circles, &c. the men bend their horses’ heads and necks in the new direction before leaving the side of the horse. Endeavor to make them perfect in their bending and trot­ting lessons; practice the going about on the haunch, by fre­quently halting at the side, and giving the word, On the haunches about, march.

 

THE HORSE’S PACES.

 

Walk, Trot, and Canter.

 

Before moving forward, the horse should be light In hand, the head brought home, (not with the nose stuck out,) the neck arched, and he should stand evenly on both hind legs.

Close the legs and communicate a sufficient Impulse to carry him forward without giving the hand; for if you do, the head and neck may relapse into a position which will defy the control of the hand.

The rider should always have a light feeling of the reins; and when the horse bears hard on the bit, keep the hand steady, use both legs, which, by bringing his haunches under him, will oblige the horse to take his weight off your hand.

It is necessary, in order to make the horse handy, to exercise him at trotting out; but it is not enough that he should trot fast; the quickness of the pace should not de­tract from his lightness in hand, or the ease with which he should be capable of answering all indications of the hand and leg.

 

 

BASIS OF INSTRUCTION,

 

The hand must be constantly at work to retain the head and neck in their proper position without counteracting the forward impulse communicated by the leg; thus the horse will acquire regularity of pace, increased speed, and that safety which is natural to a horse well balanced and light in hand.

  The canter is a repetition of bounds, during which the forehand rises first, and higher than the hind quarters.

The horse being properly placed, light in hand and well balanced, throw his weight from the forehand toward the haunches, (by increasing the pressure of the legs and restraining him with the reins,) and, according to the hand you wish to strike off to, throw the weight of the horse to the opposite side; that is, if he is to lead off with the off fore followed by the off hind, (or canter to the right,) throw the weight to his near side. This is done by pull­ing both reins equally to the left and closing the right leg; the horses head remaining placed to the right, and the left leg preventing him from throwing out his haunches. The horses off legs are thus at liberty, and the forward impulse obliges him to use them; he could not do otherwise without difficulty.

Cantering to the right, if the left fore leg leads, the horse canters false. To rectify this, feel both reins to the left, in order to bring his weight toward that side —the horse’s head remaining bent to the right—and close firmly the left leg, to bring his haunches in again.

Teach the horse to strike off on the circle first, then on the straight line. After that try him at changing leg

At this stage, when circling on the forehand, stop the horse with the inward leg and outward rein at each step; make a pause, feel both reins, close both legs, and press him up to the hand; ease the rein and leg, take another step with the haunches, stop him again,  “rein him in,’’ and close your legs. This is very useful; it prevents the horse from getting into a habit of running round with his haunches; it makes him obedient, as it teaches him not to yield to habit, but to trust to the rider’s hand and leg alone

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

for guidance; and it accustoms him to collect himself at all times, and thus he is always ready. It is very important.

Before moving off the ground give the word, Rein in your horses; caution the men to close their legs to the horses sides, and to bring the spurs close, without touching them. Give the word, Spur; the left hand is held steadily down, and the spur applied on both sides, very gently at first; the horse should not move from his ground, but merely arch his neck. This must be repeated two or three times, always quieting the horse after the spur has been given.

Repeat this at intervals.

The reining back is to be practiced often. Be careful that the men apply the legs first, and then feel the reins, to make the horse step back. See that they sit upright in their saddles; do not hurry, and be satisfied with one step at a time.

Demi-pirouette.

 

  Halt the squad, riding in file, on the side of the riding house, and give the command, On the haunches. about;

) at this caution the rider must throw the horses weight from the forehand to the haunches, by closing the legs and restraining him with the reins; at the command MARCH, given almost immediately, he must carry the reins decidedly to the side to which the turn is to be made, and close firmly the opposite leg to prevent the horse from throwing around his haunches, and force him to turn on his hind legs. When the about is completed, the horses should be squared and made much of before they are put about again.

Canter on the circle to both hands, striking off from a walk, and frequently bring them to a walk without allow­ing them to fall first into a trot.

These lessons will require at least thirty days, with one lesson a day.

Manner of accustoming the horses to leap.

 

The ditch Is leaped before the bar. The horses are led at first with a horse accustomed to the exercise in front.

 

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

The snaffle must be used. If necessary, the horse must he urged by a whip from behind. A low fence is preferable to the bar; and the horse should not be leaped often beck and forward over the same thing or at the same place.

 

To accustom horses to military noises and firing.

 

The horse, broken to obedience to the hand and legs, can he brought to face most things with little trouble. En­couraged gradually to approach anything which be fears, as a drum being beaten, until he feels it with his lip, he will then cease to be alarmed. The field music should be practiced at the exercise grounds or riding house.

A few trained horses are mixed with the new ones, and toward the close of a lesson separated a little, and the troopers who ride them fire their pistols, the riding being continued without change.

If the horses become much excited discontinue the firing until they become calm.

In firing from the horse’s back the pistol should at first be held vertically.

Especial care should be taken not to alter the feel of the horses mouth when firing, or suddenly to close the legs; the rider being cool and quiet, his horse will soon follow the example.

In all lessons, if one or more horses are so restless or unmanageable as to excite and throw the others Into con­fusion, they should be sent off and separately dealt with; they require more pains, end much caressing and other encouragement.

When the horses are accustomed to the firing, they are formed at the cud of the riding ground and marched abreast slowly toward a party of dismounted men placed at the other end;these fire several volleys, until the horses are within forty or fifty yards, when the firing ceases; the horses are ridden steadily on until they reach the men, they are then stopped and caressed.

Young horses are in like manner accustomed to the man­ual of arms, waving of flags, military music, &c.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

Practice of paces for maneuvre.

 

The remount horses must now be carefully practiced, as all the regimental horses must be, at the paces of maneuvre.

Nothing can be more important to the regularity and order, and often the success, of large bodies of cavalry than uniformity In the gaits. The walk should be at the rate of three and three-fourths miles an hour, the trot seven and a half miles an hour, and the gallop ten miles an hour. To confirm the horses In these uniform rates, measure off a half mile and practice the horses to walk it in eight min­utes; trot It in four mlnutes, and gallop it in three minutes.

 

 

ARTICLE EIGHTH.

 

DEFINITIONS AND GENERAL PRINCIPLES.

 

A RANK is composed of men abreast of each other.

A FILE is a man in rank; or two or more men, one be-hind another in ranks.

FRONT is the direction perpendicular to the alignment of a body of troops and before it, either in column or in line.

CENTRE is the middle of such a body.

WINGS are the two grand divisions into which a regiment, or an army, is divided, when in line.

FLANK is the right or left side of a column, or line,

INTERVAL is the vacant space between two bodies of troops, or between files.

The interval between two troopers in rank is 4 inches from knee to knee.

Distance is the vacant space between any two subdivisions in column.

When a body of troops is formed in column of platoons, the distances prescribed are measured from the fore feet of the horses of one rank to the fore feet of the horses of another rank.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

DEPTH is the space included between the head and the rear of a column.

The depth of a regiment In close column is about equal to a platoon front multiplied by the number of squadrons.

To estimate the front of a troop, and the depth of a col­umn, it is necessary to know that a horse, when mounted, occupies in breadth one yard. The length of a horse is con­sidered three yards.

By the CROUP is always meant the rear extremity of the horse.

ALIGNMENT is the placing of men, or troops, on the same line.

When a body of troops Is to form and align itself on another, it halts one horse’s length in rear of the line of formation.

A COLUMN is the disposition of a body of troops In sub­divisions, one behind another.

OPEN COLUMN is formed of subdivisions, having between them the distance necessary to form in line in every way, being generally of platoons, the column of maneuvre. That column is distinguished by the name, open column.

CLOSE COLUMN is formed of squadrons, with a distance of platoon front from one to another. The object of this dis­position is to give the least possible depth to the column.

DOUBLE COLUMN is formed by the advance from the centre of a line, by platoons at wheeling distance, the right wing left in front, the left wing right in front: the two columns preserving an interval between their flanks.

POINTS OF DIRECTION serve to point out the direction In which a troop in line, or in column, is to march; or elms Ic mark the right and left of a line.

INTERMEDIATE POINTS are those taken between the fixed points They are used to preserve the desired direction during the march, or to insure the rectitude of the forma­tion of the lines.

The two sergeants on the flank, who are not counted in the rank, are the right guide and left guide of their respective squadrons.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

In the oblique march the guide Is on the side towards which the march is made; and when the primitive direc­tion is resumed, after having obliqued, the guide is where it was before having obliqued.

In a column composed of cavalry and infantry, the guides of the cavalry cover the second file of the subdivisions of Infantry on the side of the guides. In line, the officers who are in front of the squadrons align themselves on the rear rank of the infantry.

WHEEL is a circular movement executed by a body of troops in line; each of the men describes the arc of a circle in proportion to his distance from the pivot.

ABOUT FACE, or WHEEL, is to face or wheel so as to reverse the front.

RIGHT, or LEFT FACE, is to face at right angles to the former front.

RIGHT HALF, or LEFT HALFFACE, or WHEEL, is a wheel of 45 degrees.

PIVOT is the man of the flank on which the wheel is made; there are two kinds, the fixed pivot and the movable pivot.

The pivot is fixed whenever he turns upon himself; it is movable when he describes an arc of a circle.

The arc of a circle described by the pivot of a rank of  two, of four, of eight, or of a platoon making the fourth of a wheel, is 5 yards; and for a squadron it is 20 yards.

PLOYMENT is the movement by which a regiment forms from line into close column

DEPLOYMENT is the movement by which a regiment forms from close column into line.

FORMATION is the regular placing of all the fractions of a body of troops in any prescribed order.

PACES: There are three kinds: the walk, the trot, and the gallop.

On foot there are three kinds of step: the common step, quick step, and the double quick step.

On foot the movements are executed habitually at the quick step, without the command being given. When they


 

 

BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

                                                                 

are to he executed at the common step, or double quick, the command should signify it.

The pace, when used as a measure, is 3 feet.

On foot the common step is at the rate of 90 per minute; the quick step is at the rate of 110 per minute; the double quick step is at the rate of 165 per minute.

THE DIRECT MARCH us that which is executed by troops in line or in column, to move off perpendicularly to their alignment.

THE MARCH BY A FLANK is that by which ground is gained to the right or left, after having made the fourth of a wheel.

THE OBLIQUE MARCH is that by which, when moving for­ward, ground is gained towards one of the flanks without changing the front. There are two kinds, the individual oblique march and the oblique march by troop.

The individual oblique march is that which is executed by an individual movement of each man.

The oblique march by troop is that which is executed by the movement, at the same time, of each of the subdivisions of atroop in line.

COUNTER MARCH, is a movement by which the men of a rank march to form themselves facing the rear, parallel to the first formation.

THE CHARGE is a direct and impetuous march, the object of which is to strike the enemy.

SKIRMISHERS are men dispersed in front, in rear, or on the flanks of a troop, to cover its movements or its position.

OBSTACLE is anything in the nature of the ground which obliges troops in line to ploy a part of their front.

DEFILE is a passage which compels a line to ploy into column, or a column to diminish its front.

EVOLUTIONS are the regular movements by which a regi­ment passes from one order to another.

Evolutions of the line, are these same movements executed by several regiments. Their application, combined with the position or movements of the enemy, is called maneuvres.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

COMMANDS: There are three kinds:

The command of caution, which is “Attention.” it is the signal to preserve immobility and to give attention.

The preparatory command. It indicates the movement which is to be executed.

The command of execution, at which the action is com­menced

The tone of command should be animated, distinct, and of a loudness proportioned to the troop which is com­manded.

Preparatory commands should be uttered with all pos­sible distinctness.

In commands of execution articulation is not so neces­sary; hut they should be prolonged, because the movement which is to follow them being communicated from the man to the horse. all jerking or abruptness is thereby avoided; and they will be better heard amid the noise of cavalry in motion.

In the manual of arms, the part of the command which causes an execution should be pronounced in a firm and brief tone.

The commands of caution, and the preparatory com­mands, are distinguished by italics; those of execution, by CAPITALS.

A TIME is one of the parts into which an action Is divided to facilitate the instruction and execution. A motion is a further subdivision with the same object.

 

ARTICLE NINTH.

(The book of signals is at the end of the work.)

1.    The general.

2.    Boots and saddles.

3.    To horse.

4.    The assembly.

5.    To arms.

6.   To the standard.

7.   The march. (It also answers for a quick step on foot.)

8.    The charge.

 


BASIS OF INSTRUCTION.

 

9.    The rally.

10.  Reveille.

11.  Stable call.

12.  Watering call.

13.  Breakfast call.

14.  Assembly of the guard.

15.  Orders for the orderly sergeants.

16.  Assembly of the trumpeters.

17.  Retreat.

18.  Fatigue call.

19.  Dinner call.

20.  Distributions.

21.  Drill call.

22.  Officers call.

23.  The recall.

24.  Sick call.

25.  Tattoo.

26.  To extinguish lights.

 

For the service of skirmishers.

1.    Forward.

2.    Halt.

3.    To the left.

4.    To the right.

5.    The about.

6.    Change direction to the right.

7.    Change direction to the left.

8.    Trot.

9.    Gallop.

10.  To commence firing.

11.  To cease firing.

12.  To charge as foragers.

The rally is No~ 9, general signals.

To change the gait to a walk, halt, and forward are sounded.

 

NOTE—The recall serves to withdraw troops, so that they rejoin the main body, or the commander, at the ordinary gait; and also for the cessation of exercises.

 

 


TITLE SECOND.

 

INSTRUCTION ON FOOT.

____________

 

SCHOOL OF THE TROOPER, DISMOUNTED.

 

1.—The object of this school being the individual and progressive instruction of the recruits, the instructor at first does not require a movement to be executed until he has given an exact explanation of it; and he executes him­selfthe movement which he commands, so as to join example to precept. He accustoms the recruit to take by himself the position which Is explained, touches him to rectify it only when required by his want of intelligence, and sees that all the movements are performed without precipitation.

Each movement should be perfectly understood before passing to another. After they have been properly executed in the order laid down in each lesson, the instructor no longer confines himself to that order; on the contrary, he should change it, that he may judge of the intelligence of the men.

2 —The instructor allows the men to rest two or three times in the hour; for this purpose he commands REST.

At the command REST the trooper is no longer required to preserve immobility, but will keep his left heel in its place.

3.—When the Instructor wishes to commence the instruc­tion, he commands, ATTENTION; at this command the trooper takes his position, remains motionless, and fixes his attention.

4.—The first principles of the position and those of the march are taught to each man individually, or, at most, to

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

eight at a time. In the latter case they are placed on the mane line, one yard from each other, without being required

to align themselves.

 

 

POSITION OF THE TROOPER DISMOUNTED.

 

5 —The heels on the same line as near each other as the conformation of the man will permit;

The feet turned out equally, and forming with each other something less than a right angle;

The knees straight without stiffness;

The body erect on the hips, Inclining a little forward;

The belly rather drawn In, and the breast advanced;

The shoulders square and falling equally;

The arms hanging near the side;

The palm of the hand turned a little to the front;

The head erect and square to the front, without con­stralnt;

The chin somewhat drawn In;

The eyes straight to the front.

When the trooper is armed the left hand hangs by the side over the sabre.

 

 

EYES RIGHT, EYES LEFT.

 

6.—The instructor commands:

 

1.         Eyes—Right.

2.         FRONT.

 

At the first command, turn the head gently to the right. so that the corner of the left eye, next to the nose, may be on a line with the buttons of the jacket.

At the command FRONT, turn the head gently to the front.

7.—The movement eyes left is executed after the same principles at the commands:

 


TROOPER, DISMOUNTED.

 

1.         Eyes—Left.

2.         FRONT.

 

8.—The instructor will take particular care that the movement of the head does not derange the squareness of the shoulders, which would happen if it were too sudden, or if the head were turned more than is necessary.

As the trooper should turn the head only to align him­self, and in the wheelings, it is important that he should be accustomed to turn it but very little.

 

 

RIGHT FACE, LEFT FACE, ABOUT FACE, RIGHT OBLIQUE FACE, LEFT OBLIQUE FACE.

 

9.—The instructor commands:

 

I.Right (or left.)

 

2.FACE.

 

1 time.

 

At the second command, raise the right foot slightly, turn on the left heel, raising the toes a little, and then re­place the right heel by the aide of the left, and on the same line.

 

1. —About—FACE.

 

 

2 times.

 

I. At the first part of the command, make a half face to the right, turning on the left heel, place the right foot square behind the left, the hollow of it opposite to, and three inches from, the left heel.

2.    At the command FACE, turn on both heels to face to

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

the rear, raising the toes a little, the knees straight, and bring the right foot by the aide of the left.

 

11.—1. Right oblique (or left oblique.)

2.  FACE

 

1. time.

 

At the second command, raise the right foot a little, turn upon the left, raising the toes slightly, and then re­place the right heel by the side of the left, on the same line, making face 30 degrees to the right or left, (one-third of a right or left face.)

 

12—The instructor pays particular attention that the position of the body shall not be deranged by these move­ments.

 

 

COMMON STEP.

 

13.—The length of the common step is 2 feet 4 inches, measured from heel to heel its quickness is at the rate of 90 per minute.

14.—To explain the principles and mechanism of the step, the instructor places himself 8 or 10 paces in front, facing the squad he executes the step slowly himself.

He commands:

 

1. Forward.

2. MARCH.

 

At the command forward, throw the weight of the body on the right leg.

At the command MARCH, carry forward the left foot, smartly and without a jerk, 2 feet 4 inches from the right, the knee straight, the toe a little depressed, and slightly turned out, the upper part of the body inclined forward;

 


TROOPER DISMOUNTED.

 

plant the left foot, the whole weight of the body being thrown on it; carry forward the right leg, smartly and without jerk, the foot near the ground; plant it at the same distance, and in the same manner as has just been explained for the left foot, and continue to march without crossing the legs or turning the shoulders, and with the face always to the front.

 

15.—To halt, the instructor commands:

 

1.         Squad.

2.         HALT.

 

At the command, bring the foot which is in rear by the side of the other, without shock.

 

16.—The instructor marks the cadence of the step from time to time by the command one, at the moment when the left foot should be planted; this cadence being regulated at the rate of 90 steps per minute.

 

TO CHANGE FEET.

 

17.—The instructor teaches this to the squad one at a time; it is used to catch the step when lost.

The foot that is being advanced from the rear is planted by the side of the other, which is instantly advanced in its stead so as not to lose the cadence.

 

 

TO MARCH BY A FLANK.

 

18—The men being in line at a halt, the instructor com­mands:

 

1. Right—FACE.

2. Forward.

3. MARCH.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

At the command MARCH, the whole file step off with animation together, with the left foot.

19.—A well-instructed man should at first march by the side of the leading man.

The instructor will cause the men to cover each other accurately. He will see that they do not    look downwards, and do not bend the knee.

 

 

TO FACE TO THE RIGHT OR LEFT WHEN

 

MARCHING.

 

20.—The squad marching, the instructor commands:

1.         By the right flank.

2.         MARCH.

At the command MARCH, turn the body to the right, and step off with the right foot in the new direction, without losing the cadence of the step.

The instructor gives the command MARCH at the moment when the left foot is coming to the ground.

When it is to the left, the command MARCH is given at the moment when the right foot is coming to the ground.  By this means the new direction is always commenced with the leg on the side towards which the turn is made.

 

OBLIQUE FACE TO THE RIGHT OR LEFT

 

WHEN MARCHING.

 

21.—The squad marching, the instructor commands:

 

1.  Right oblique.

2.  MARCH.

 

At the command MARCH the men make an oblique face to the right (or to the left,) and march in the new direction.

22. —To resume the primitive direction, the instructor commands:

FORWARD.

 


TROOPER, DISMOUNTED.

 

At this command the men make an oblique face to the left, if they have obliqued to the right, and an oblique face to the right, if they have obliqued to the left, and march straight to the front.

 

QUICK STEP.

 

33.—The length of the quick step is the same as that of the common step, and its quickness is at the rate of 110 per minute.

The squad being at a halt, the Instructor commands.

 

1.         Forward, quick time.

2.         MARCH.

At the command MARCH, step off smartly with the left foot.

24.—The squad Is exercised, when marching at the quick step, to halt, move on, face to the right and left, half face to the right and left, and move off again, as In common time.

25.—The squad marching in quick time, to change to common time, the instructor commands:

1.         Common time.

2.         MARCH.

At the command MARCH, the squad takes the common step.

36.—To resume the quick step, the instructor com· mands:

1.         Quick time.

2.         MARCH.

At the command MARCH, the squad resumes the quick step

 

 

DOUBLE QUICK STEP.

 

27.—The squad marching in common or quick time, to change to double quick time, the instructor commands:

 

1. Double quick.

2. MARCH.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

At the command MARCH, the men increase the length of step to 33 inches, and its rapidity to 166 steps in a minute.

In this march the carriage of the body is different, being nearer that of running The body is more advanced, the knees more bent, the arms with their natural motion.

From a halt, the command is:

 

1.         Forward, double quick.

2.         MARCH.

 

SABRE EXERCISE.

 

28.—For this lemon the squad is composed of from 6 to 8 men, armed only with sabres; they are placed in one rank, 9 feet from each other.

The object of the moulinet is to render the joints of the arm and wrist supple, and as it adds to the confidence of the men when isolated, by increasing their dexterity, they should first be exercised at it, as a preparation for the other motions.

Each lesson is therefore commenced and ended with moulinets, executed with a quickness proportioned to the progress of the troopers. The instructor pays particular attention that the men do not employ a degree of force in the sabre exercise, which not only is less necessary than skill and suppleness, but which is even prejudicial. He observes, also, that they do not lean to one side, in such a manner as to lose the seat, when mounted; he requires more especially, in the motions of the sabre to the rear, that the blade shall not fall too near the body, for fear of wounding the horse. In describing a circle, the fiat of the blade should be to the side, and the edge to the front, and it should be so directed as not to touch either the horse’s head, or his haunches, or the knees of the rider.

When the troopers execute all the motions with regul­arity, the instructor requires each cut to be given without decomposing it; the last syllable of a command is the signal for the quick execution of it. All the cuts are then

 


TROOPER DISMOUNTED.

 

terminated by a half-moulinet, which brings back to the position of GUARD.

Thrusts should always be used in preference, as they re­quire less force, and their result is more prompt, sure, and decisive. They should be directed quickly home to the body of the adversary, the sabre being held with the full grasp, the thumb pressing against the guard in the direction of the blade.

The parries against the lance are the same as against the point.

29.—The instructor explains what is meant by right and left side of the gripe; by tierce, and by quarte.

The right side of the gripe is the side opposite to the guard.

The left side of the gripe is the side next to the guard.

Tierce is the position in which the edge of the blade is turned to the right, the nails downwards.

Quarte is the position in which the edge of the blade is turned to the left, the nails upwards.

To rest, the sabres being returned, the instructor conforms to what is prescribed, No. 2.

30.—The troopers being placed asprescribed, No. 28, the instructor commands:

 

 

Draw—SABRE.

 

2 times.

 

1.    At the first part of the command, unhook the sabre with the left hand, and bring the hilt to the front; run the right wrist through the sword-knot; seize the gripe, draw the blade 6 inches out of the scabbard, pressing the scab­bard against the thigh with the left hand, which seizes it at the tipper ring.

2. At the command, SABRE!, draw the sabre quickly, raising the arm to its full extent, at an angle of about 45 de­grees; the sabre in a straight line with the arm, make a alight pause, carry the blade to the right shoulder, the back

 


            SCHOOL OF THE

 

of it against the hollow of the shoulder, the wrist resting against the hip, the little finger on the outside of the gripe.

 

Return—SABRE.

 

2 times.

 

31.—At the command, SABRE, carry the sabre vertically to the front, the thumb opposite to and 6 inches from the neck, the blade vertical, the edge to the left, the thumb extended on the right side of the gripe, the little finger by the side of the others.

32. At the command, SABRE, carry the wrist opposite to and 6 inches from the left shoulder; revolve the point of the blade to the rear, until it is nearly under the right hand, which, at the same time, is raised; the left hand, also at the same time, takes hold of the upper part of the scabbard; turn the eyes slightly to the left, return the blade, free the wrist from the sabre knot, drop the right hand by the side; turning with the left the hilt toward the body, and so round to the rear, hook up the sabre, end drop the left hand.

32.—The sabres being drawn, the instructor commands:

 

 

GUARD.

 

1 time.

 

At the command, GUARD, carry the right foot about 20 inches from the left, the heels on the same line; place the left hand closed, 6 inches from the body, and ashigh as the elbow, the fingers towards the body, the little finger nearer than the thumb (position of the bridle hand;) at the same time, carry the right hand about 10 inches in front of the right hip, the blade in an oblique position, the point a little raised, the edge upward, the back of the blade rest­ing in the hollow of the left arm, as near the body as

 

Par. 32

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Right Moulinet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 


TROOPER DISMOUNTED.

 

possible; the right hand without constraint, or feeling the weight of the sabre.

 

Left—MOULINET.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 

33.—1. At the command, MOULINET, extend the right arm to the front to its full length, the hand in tierce and as high as the eyes; the point to the front, and a little higher than the hilt.

2. Commencing by lowering the blade, make rapidly a circle round the hand, to the left of, and as near as safe, to the horse, and to the elbow; returning to the first position, and then to guard.

 

RIght—MOULINET.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 

34.—1. At the command, MOULINET, extend the right arm to the front to its full length, the hand in quarte, and as high as the eyes, the point to the front, and a little higher than the hilt.

2. Commencing by lowering the blade, make rapidly a circle round the hand, to the right of the horse and body, returning to the first position, and then to guard.

36.—To execute the moulinet without stopping, if the instructor wishes to begin by the left, he commands:

 

Left and right—MOULINET.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 

38.—If he wishes to begin by the right, he commands:

 

Right and left—MOULINET.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

At either of these commands, the troopers, commencing from the position of guard, execute alternately what is laid down in Nos. 33 and 34, without stopping at any motion.

 

Rear—MOULINET.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 

37.—1. At the command, MOULINET, raise the arm to the right and rear to its full extent, the point of the sabre up­wards, the edge to the right, the thumb extended on the back of the gripe, the body slightly turned to the right.

2. Describe a circle in rear, commencing by motion of the sabre towards the left, the arm being motionless to the wrist, return to the 1st position and then to guard.

When the troopers execute the moulinets well, the in­structor requires them to execute several in succession, until the command GUARD.

 

In tierce—POINT.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

38.—1. At the command, POINT, raise the hand in tierce, as high as the right ear, and 7 inches from It, throw back the right shoulder, carrying the elbow to the rear, the point of the sabre to the right of the horse’s head and neck, and a little below the horizontal, the edge upwards, the thumb on the back of the gripe.

2. Thrust forward, extending the arm to it, full length, the edge of the sabre up.

3. Return to the position of guard.

 

In quarte—POINT.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

 

39.—At the command, POINT, lower the hand in

 

 

 


Par. 40


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Par. 41

 


 

 

 

 

Right-POINT

 

 

 

TROOPER DISMOUNTED.

 

quarte near the right hip, t\he thumb extended on the right side of the gripe, the point a little higher than the wrist, edge to the left.

2. Thrust to the right front, extending the arm to its full length, the edge of the blade to the left.

3. Return to the position of guard.

 

Left—POINT.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

40.—1. At the command, POINT, turn the head to the left, (half face to the left In the saddle,) raise the hand in tierce as high as the right ear, and 7 inches from It, the thumb on the back of the gripe, the edge of the blade up­wards, the point directed to the left.

2. Thrust to the left, or left front, extending the arm to Its full length, the edge up.

3. Return to the position of guard.

 

Right —POINT.

 

1 time—3 motions.

 

41.—At the command, POINT, turn the head to the right, (half face to the right in the saddle,) carry the hand in quarte near the left breast, the edge upwards, the point directed to the right.

2. Thrust to the right, or right front, extending the arm to its fall length, edge to the front.

S. Return to the position of guard.

 

Rear—POINT.

 

1 time 3 motions.

 

42.—1. At the command, POINT, turn the head to the right and rear, (half face to the right in the saddle,) bring

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

the hand in quarts in front of the right shoulder, the arm half extended, the blade horizontal, the point to the rear, the edge upwards.

2. Thrust to the rear, or right rear, extending the arm to its full length, edge to the right.

3.Return to the position of guard.

 

Against infantry, left—POINT.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

43.—At the command, POINT, turn the head to the left, (half face to the left in the saddle,) raise the hand In tierce near the neck, the thumb on the back of the gripe, the point of the sabre directed at the height of the breast of a man on foot.

2. Thrust down in tierce.

3. Return to the position of guard.

 

Against infantry, right—POINT.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

44.—1. At the command, POINTturn the head and body toward the right, carry the hand In quarte near the right hip, the thumb on the right side of the gripe, the point of the sabre directed at the height of the breast of a man on foot.

2.    Thrust in quarts.

3. Return to the position of guard.

 

Against infantry—FRONT POINT.

 

1 time.

 

45.—At the command, POINT, bear the weight on the right stirrup, bend well down to the right, extend the right arm well downwards, and, with the back of the sabre up­wards, thrust forward, horizontally, and resume the guard,

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Par. 43

 


 

 

 

 

 

TROOPER DISMOUNTED.

 

Front-Cut.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

46.—1. At the command, CUT, raise the sabre, the arm half extended, the hand a little higher than the head, the edge upwards, the point to the rear and higher than the hand.

2. Cut to the right of the horse’s neck, extending the arm to its full length.

3. Return to the position of guard.

 

 

USED AGAINST CAVALRY AND INFANTRY.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

47.—1. At the command, CUT, turn the head to the left, (half face to the left in the saddle,) raise the sabre, the arm extended to the front and right, the hand in quarte, and as high as the head, the point higher than the hand.

2. Cut diagonally to the left, in quarte.

3. Return to the position of guard.

This is also used against infantry, bending well forward and down, and cutting at the necessary angle.

 

Right—CUT.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

48.—1. At the command, cur, turn the head to the right, carry the hand near the left shoulder, the point of the sabre upwards, the edge to the left.

2. Extend the arm quickly to its full length, give a back­handed cut horizontally, in tierce.

3. Return to the position of guard.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

Rear -CUT.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

49.—1. At the command, CUT, turn the head to the right, throwing back the right shoulder, (half face to the right In the saddle,) carry the hand near the left shoulder, the sabre perpendicular, the edge to the left.

2. Extend the arm quickly to its full length, and give a back-handed cut horizontally to the rear, in tierce.

Return to the position of guard.

 

Right, in tierce and quarte.—CUT.

 

1 time, 4 motions.

 

50.—i. At the command, cur, execute the 1st motion of right cut, No. 48.

2. Execute the 2d motion of right cut, No. 48.

3.    Turn the hand in quarte, and cut horizontally to the left.

4. Return to the position of guard.

 

 

Left, in quarte and tierce—CUT.

 

1 time, 4 motions.

 

51.—1. At the command, CUT, execute the 1st motion of left cut, No. 47.

2. Execute the 3d motion of left cut, No. 47.

3. Turn the hand in tierce, and cut horizontally to the right.

4. Return to the position of guard.


 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Par. 53



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Par.55

 

 

 

 

 

 

Against Infantry, Right—Parry.

 

 

 

 

TROOPER DISMOUNTED.

 

Right—Parry.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 

52.—1. At the command, PAINT, grasp the sabre firmly, extend the arm to the right, the hand moving horizontally, the point at the same time describing a circular motion up­wards, and with the edge to the right, parry as strongly as possible the blow aimed at the right side.

2. Return to the position of guard.

 

Left—PARRY.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 

53.—1. Raise the hand above, and about seven inches in front of the eyes, the elbow somewhat bent, edge to the left, point downwards and about a foot outside the horses left shoulder, and parry as strongly as possible the blow aimed at the left side.

2. Return to the position of guard.

 

Head—PARRY.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 

54.—1. At the command, PARRY, raise the sabre quickly above the head, holding it with the utmost firmness, the arm nearly extended, the edge upward, the point to the left, and about 6 inches higher than the hand.

The hand is carried more or less to the right, left, or rear, according to the position of the adversary.

2. Return to the position of guard.

 

Against infantry right—PARRY.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

right, (half facing to the right in the saddle,) raise the sabre, the arm extended to the right and rear, the point upwards, the thumb extended on the back of the gripe, the edge to the left.

2. Parry the bayonet with the back of the blade, by a rapid circular motion of arm and blade, from rear to front, bringing the hand as high as the hind, the paint upwards, edge to the front.

3. Return to the position of guard.

 

Against infantry, left—PARRY.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

56—1. At the command, PARRY, turn the head to the left, (half face to the left in the saddle,) raise the sabre, the arm extended to the front and right, the point upwards, the thumb extended on the back of the gripe, the back of the blade to the front.

2. Parry the bayonet with the back of the blade, by a forcible circular motion of the arm and blade from front to rear, bringing the band above the left shoulder, edge to the rear, the point upwards.

3.    Return to the position of guard.

 

 

PARRIES AGAINST THE LANCE, (OR SABRE.)

 

In tierce—PARRY.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 

57.—1. At the command, PARRY, carry the forearm and blade quickly to the front and right, the elbow but little moved, edge to the right, thumb on the back of the gripe, the point being carried to the right front, at the height of the eyes.

2. Return to the position of guard.

 

 


Par.57


 
 

 

In Tierce, Parry


 

 

TROOPER DISMOUNTED

 

In quarte.—PARRY.

 

I time, 2 motions.

 

58.—1. At the command, PARRY, carry the arm and blade quickly to the left front, edge to the left, the point as high as the eyes, the thumb on the back of the gripe.

2. Return to the position of guard.

 

59.—When the troopers begin to execute correctly the above cuts, thrusts, and parries, the instructor requires them to make the application of them by combined motions, such as follow:

In tierce—POINT AND FRONT CUT.

In quarte.—POINT AND FRONT CUT

Left—POINT AND CUT.

Right—POINT ANDCUT.

Rear—POINT AND CUT.

Against infantry right—POINT AND CUT.

Against infantry left—POINTAND CUT.

 

 

 

As It is prescribed in No. 30, and carry the right foot to the side of the left.

 

 

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS AND DIRECTIONS.

 

60—Great attention should at all times be paid to maintain the proper position and balance of the body as by too great an exertion in delivering a cut or point a horseman may be thrown, or be so discomposed as to lose advantage of his skill, both for attack and defence; and he should have confidence in his parries, and not trust to his avoiding the attack of his opponent by turning or drawing back the body.

In delivering a forward point very little force is necessary when the horse is in quick motion, as the extension of the

 

 

SCHOOL OF THE

arm, with a good direction of the point, will be fully suffi­cient; nor should a cut, under such circumstances, be given too strong, as the impetus of the horse will give effective force. Even the drawing of the edge can frequently be ap­plied with advantage, particularly when the point, by being given too soon, may not have taken effect; bys quick turn of the wrist the edge is drawn along the face of your oppo­nent, or other exposed part. The forcing, also, of the edge can be resorted to when very near and closely pressed upon by an adversary by suddenly extending the arm and direct­ing the edge across his face, or where an opening is given.

When sufficient space is allowed for choosing the point of attack you should endeavor to take advantage of it; if not, at all events to avoid its being made on your left rear, when a change of position alone can bring you upon an equality with your opponent; it may be done either by making a sudden halt, so as to allow him to pass, and then pressing upon his left rear, or by turning quickly to the left about, and thereby having your right opposed to his. Should you be prevented doing this, and he still keeps upon your left, you must bear up as close as possible to him, otherwise your opposition will be ineffectual; for in his situation, by keeping at the proper distance from you, his cut will reach when yours will not, and consequently you will be reduced to the defence alone.

In meeting your opponent on the left front turn sharply to the left on your own ground, which brings you imme­diately with your sword arm free, and at liberty to act upon his left. And in meeting him upon the right front, press your horse quickly on, and by a sharp turn to the right gain his left rear, or if pursued endeavor to keep your adversary on the right rear When attacked by more than one you will naturally endeavor to keep them both either to the right or left, but when they have been enabled to place themselves on both sides, press close upon the left opponent, and endeavor to keep the right one at a distance.

The attack or defence against the lance (it is the common weapon of the mounted Indians) depends much upon horse-


TROOPER, DISMOUNTED.

 

manship, and the judgment of the rider. It is parried like the sword; and you must press in at your opportunity to close upon your antagonist. You must invariably endeavor to gain his right rear when he is least able to attack or defend; the left rear and left, weakest for the sabre, are the strongest positions for the lance; the same may be said of the bow and arrow; in pursuit always approach at the right rear.

When opposed to infantry, endeavor to meet an opponent on your right; in the parry the bayonet must be struck, and by the stronger part of your sabre; the cuts form a defence as well as attack upon Infantry, but the point should be chiefly used in pursuit.

In the use of the sabre at speed, it is important that the horseman should aid the impetus of the cut, and secure his own seat by supporting the sway of the body with the op­posite leg to that side on which he Intends to cut or point; for instance, In the left cut he should support the body by a strong pressure of the inside of the right thigh and leg against the saddle and horse; in the right cuts support the body with the left leg, the lower down the grip can be taken the better, not touching the horse with the spur. It is particularly applicable and necessary in pursuit over rough and varied ground.

Cuts very often fail from the sabre turning enough to make the blow one with the flat; at best the wound is gen­erally trifling compared to those made by thrusts.

The instructor should impress upon the recruits such occasional observations as become applicable. Opportunities should be taken in pauses of rests; the squad should not be kept very long In positions or movements.

 

 

MANUAL OF THE PISTOL.

 

61,—The army revolver being worn In a belt-holster, suspended by the belt at the right side of the back, the instructor commands:

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

Draw—PISTOL.

 

1 time.

 

62.—At the command, PISTOL, with the right hand un­button the flap of the belt-hoister, draw the pistol, and, holding it at the stock, with the point of the forefinger reaching above the trigger guard, carry it vertically, with the hand as high as the right shoulder, and six inches in front of it.

63.—The instructor commands:

 

READY.

 

1 time.

 

At this command, place the pistol in the left hand, as the height of the breast, the muzzle elevated and directed to the left front, cock and raise pistol, (position No. 62.)

 

AIM.

 

1 time.

 

64.—At this command, lower the pistol to the front, the arm about three-fourths extended, the forefinger upon the trigger; aim with the right eye, the left eye closed.

 

FIRE.

 

1 time.

 

65.—At this command, fire and raise pistol.

66.—At the position of AIM, the instructor may command, raise—PISTOL, at which command the men raise the pistols to the position No. 62; and if the pistol is not fired, at the command, return—P15T0L, first let down the hammer.

67.—To cock the pistol rapidly without the use of the

 


TROOPER DISMOUNTED.

 

left hand, place the thumb Upon and press down the ham­mer, throwing forward the muzzle with a rapid motion, to assist the action of the thumb.

68.—In a possible case requiring it, the revolver may be used in rank dismounted with great effect, in firing to the front, or right or left oblique, by volley or file firing.

To reload, the rank would be ordered to sit on the ground and load at will.

69.—Being at the position of raise pistol, the instructor commands:

 

Return—PISTOL.

 

At the command, PISTOL, lower the pistol, carrying it to the rear, and return it to the holster, and button the flap.

 

 

INSPECTION OF ARMS.

 

70.—The instructor commands:

 

Inspection —SABRE.

 

1 time, 7 motions.

 

1. At the command, SABRE, execute the first time of draw sabre, No. 30.

2.    Execute the second time of draw sabre, No. 30.

3. Present sabre as it is described in first time of No. 31.

4. Move the thumb to the hack of the gripe, and turn it in the hand, the edge turning by the front, to the right

5. Carry the sabre to the shoulder, as it is described in No. 30.

6. Execute the first time of return sabre, No.31.

7. Execute the second time of return sabre, No. 31.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

71. The instructor commands:

 

Inspection—PISTOL.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

1.    At the command, PISTOL, draw pistol, and come to the position of raise pistol, No. 62.

2.    Place the pistol in the left hand, at the height of the breast, the muzzle elevated and directed to the left, hall cock with the right hand drop the left hand by the side, and hold the pistol vertically, in front of, and 4 inches from, the middle of the body, the butt at the height of the belt, the guard to the left; the right fore-arm against the side.

3. Take the pistol in the left hand, as in No. 63, let down the hammer, and return the pistol to the hoister, button the flap, and drop the hand to the side.

72.  When the men execute the details correctly, the in­structor commands:

 

Inspection—ARMS.

 

At the command, ARMS,the men execute the first and second motions of inspection of pistol, No 71.

As soon as the inspector has passed the man on his left, each man executes the third motion of inspection of pistol, and first and second motions of inspection of sabre.

Each man, as the inspector reaches him the second time, executes the third and fourth motions of inspection of sabre; and as soon as the inspector has passed again the next man, he executes the fifth, sixth, and seventh motions of inspection of sabre, No. 70.

73. The inspector passes from right to left, returning to the right by the rear; he handles the pistols if he desires, returning them to the troopers in the same position in which they are held for inspection.

 


TROOPER, DISMOUNTED.

 

TARGET PRACTICE.

 

74. The target is six feet high and two feet wide; a black stripe 3 inches wide is painted at the centre, from top to bottom; and two feet and a half from the top a white square of three inches is painted on the black.

When practicable a man is placed behind a ball-proof obstacle, within reach by a wand, of the target; with this he points out the position of each hit, immediately after it is made; so that the person firing can see from his place.

When each has finished his shots, his hits are marked, measured, and noted, as well as the misses.

The squad first fires at 20 yards, each man fires to the front, rear, right, and left; one shot each a day.

The firing is next at thirty yards, and is carried regu­larly by the decimal increase up to one hundred yards.

An officer is always present at target firing.

 

 

 

PLATOON, SQUADRON, AND REGIMENT, DISMOUNTED.

 

75.—The practice of field movements on foot is useful for the instruction of young officers and men, and when, for any reason, mounted exercises are not practicable.

The formation, telling off, words of command, and all the movements are the same, with the modifications, which follow:

The walk and the trot are the only gaits substituted by the quick time and double quick time. The word of com­mand, “walk/’ will be substituted by quick time; ‘trot,” by double quick.

All the movements will be In quick time when the com­mand is not double quick.”

In line, at the command, right—FACE, after all face to the right, all numbers two and four step up to the left side

 


SCHOOL OF THE.

 

of numbers one and three; If the command is left--face, the odd numbers step up to the right of the even numbers.

A column of twos right in front, being faced to the left at a halt, or marching, the odd numbers step up into their places on the right of the even numbers; if left in front, and faced to the right, the even numbers step up between the odd numbers.

The commands and methods found in Nos. 7 to 27, in­clusive, of the school of the trooper dismounted, will be fol­lowed.

To form twos and fours, and to break by twos and file, is always done at the same gait, without halting, closing or increasing the distances; when increasing front, the files who have to move up doing so with a step or two in double quick, and all together.

To break a platoon, marching in line, by fours, at the same gait, each set, but the foremost, halt, until the one which is to precede it has moved forward, or obliqued two steps.

On the same principle, when the squadron in line is broken by platoon, each platoon waits until the one which precedes it has gained a distance of three-fourths of a platoon front.

A column of fours making a turn, the pivot shortens his step to 18 inches, (he marches ten steps in making the turn,) and the man on the other flank increases his to about 32 inches.

In a platoon turning, the pivot man does the same, the outer flank moves in double quick.

To countermarch a squadron the commands are:

1.       Countermarch by the right or (left) flank.

2.       Right (or Left)—FACE.

3.       MARCH.

 

At the first command, the right guide places himself three paces in rear of the left guide and faces to the rear.

At the command, MARCH, all step off together, the platoon commander by the side, and conducting the two leading

 


TROOPER, DISMOUNTED.      

 

men, who turn about, and march close to the column. When arrived near the guide, the captain commands:

 

1.       HALT.

2.       Left (or Right)—FACE.

3.       Right (or Left)—DRESS.

4.      FRONT.

The service of skirmishers on foot is the most important; and the theory can thus be communicated, and in a great degree put in practice, with much more facility than when mounted.

 

 


TITLE THIRD.

 

INSTRUCTION ON HORSEBACK.

 

_________

 

 

SCHOOL OF THE TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

76. The object of this school is to make troopers skilful in the management of their horses and arms. The recruit must not pass from one lesson to another until he fully understands, and can execute, all which precedes.

The method prescribed to instructors in No. 1, for giving the lesson, is applicable to this school.

The instruction is always commenced at a walk; the horses, excited on first leaving the stables, are thus calmed, and the trooper is assured in his seat. The instruction is also terminated at a walk.

The most quiet and best instructed horses are chosen for the first lessons.

77. When the instructor wishes to rest the men he com­mands, REST. At this command the trooper is no longer required to remain motionless or restrained. To resume the exercise, he commands, ATTENTION.

78. The first lessons are given, if practicable, to each man separately; spurs are not used.

The horse is saddled, and in the snaffle, the reins over the neck; he is led to the ground by the right hand, holding the reins near the mouth, and his head up.  When under arms, the trooper’s sabre is hooked up, and unhooked when in position in rank

If more than one, the troopers are placed in a line three paces apart.

Arms are not used before the 7th lesson.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

FIRST LESSON.

 

POSITION OF THE TROOPER BEFORE

MOUNTING.

 

79. The trooper stands faced to the front, on the left of the horses head, his breast on a line with its mouth; he holds the reins with the right hand, at six inches from the horses mouth, the nails downward; his body, except his right arm, in a position of a soldier, No. 5.

 

TO MOUNT.

 

80. The instructor commands:

 

PREPARE TO MOUNT.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 

1. At this command [when in close order, numbers one and three lead straight forward four paces, and then all] turn to the right, letting go the reins with the right, sod taking the left rein with the left hand; step two short paces to the rear, right foot leading, so as to face the sad-die; at the same time, the right hand, with the aid of the left, takes hold of the reins over the pommel, feeling the horse’s mouth sufficiently to keep him steady, and then seizes also the pommel; drop the left hand by the side.

2. Insert the fore part of left foot in the stirrup, with the side of the left hand if necessary, and then with that hand grasp the horse’s crest and mane.

 

MOUNT.

 

1 time.

 

At this command, spring up from the right foot to an erect posture, and instantly throw the left leg over, taking

 

 

TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

your seat gently; take the reins in the left hand, and put the right foot in the stirrup.

 

Form— RANK.

 

At this command, given when in close order, numbers two and four ride gently forward into rank.

 

TO DISMOUNT.

 

81. The instructor commands

 

PREPARE TO DISMOUNT.

 

1 time.

 

1.    At this command, (when in close order, numbers one and three ride gently four paces straight forward, dressing by the right, and then all) grasp the reins with the right hand, knuckles to the right, close in front of the left hand, which lets go, and also the right side of the top of the pommel, feeling firmly the horse’s mouth; seize with the left hand the horse’s crest and mane at a convenient dis­tance, at the same time disengage the right foot from the stirrup.

 

DISMOUNT.

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 

1. At this command, rising upon the left stirrup, with the assisting support of the two hands, pass the right leg quickly over the horse’s croup to the side of the left, the body for one instant erect, and descend to the ground, the heels together; drop the left hand by the side.

2. Face to the front, the right hand leaving the pommel, and slipping along the rein as you step, left foot first, to the position of Stand to horse, No. 79, the right hand grasp­ing the reins, 6 inches from the horse’s mouth.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

At this command, given in close order, numbers two and four lead forward into rank

82. The seat natural, without drawing back the thigh; the legs hang vertically from the knees, and close the sides of the horse the balls of the foot supported in the stirrup: the knees about an inch lower than the toes these to  the front; the stirrups supporting the weight of the legs in a natural position.

The heal erect and square to the front ; the shoulders square; the carriage of the body erect, but free and unconstrained.

The curb reins held in the left hand, the little finger be­tween them; they come out over the forefinger, where they are pressed by the thumb; the forearm grazing the side, and nearly horizontal: the hand about six inches in front of the body, and close above the pommel; its back is turned somewhat under.  The right arm and hand hang naturally at the side.

83. Riding in the saddle, in the first lessons one rein of the snaffle is held in each hand, the loose end coming out over the forefinger, or with a turn round it, the thumb pressing upon it; hands from 4to 6 inches apart, a little higher than the elbows; the forearms touching the sides.

84.  The instructor commands:

1.  Right (or left) DRESS.

2.  FRONT.

As prescribed in Nos. 6, 7, and 8,

 

THE USE OF THE REINS.

 

85.  The reins serve to prepare the horse for the movements he is required to execute, to direct him, and to stop

 

 

 

Par. 76

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

him. Their action should be progressive, and in accord­ance with that of the legs.

When the trooper makes use of the reins the arms should act with suppleness, and their movements ought to extend from the wrist to the shoulder.

 

THE USE OF THE LEGS.

 

86.  The legs serve to urge the horse forward, to support him, and to aid him in turning to the right and to the left. Whenever the trooper wishes his horse to move for­ward, he should close the legs by degrees behind the girths, causing their effect to correspond with the sensibility of the horse, taking care neither to open nor elevate the knees, of which the bend should be always pliant. The trooper relaxes the legs by degrees, as he closed them.

 

THE EFFECT OF THE REINS AND LEGS

COMBINED.

 

87. In elevating a little the wrists, and closing the legs. the trooper “gathers his horse;“ in elevating again the wrists, he slackens the pace in repeating this movement of the wrists, he stops the horse, or “reins back.” The trooper ought to elevate the wrists without curving them, at the same time drawing them towards the body.

In opening the right rein and closing the right leg, the trooper turns his horse to the right. To open the right rein, the right wrist is carried, without turning It, more or less to the right, according to the sensibility of the horse.

In opening the left rein, and closing the left leg, the trooper turns his horse to the left. To open the left rein, the left wrist is carried, without turning It, more or less to the left, according to the sensibility of the horse.

By lowering slightly the wrists, the horse is at liberty to move forward; the closing the legs determines the move­ment.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

TO MARCH.

 

88. The instructor commands:

 

I. Forward.

2. MARCH.

 

At the command, forward elevate slightly the wrists, and close the legs, in order to “gather the horse.”

At the command, MARCH, lower slightly the wrists, and close the legs more or less, according to the sensibility of the horse The horse having obeyed, replace the wrists and the legs by degrees.

89. If the trooper did not gather his horse at the pre­paratory command, the execution of the second command would be too abrupt or too slow.

If the trooper, at the command of execution, did not commence by lowering the wrists, the horse would not have the liberty necessary to enable him to move forward.

If the trouper did not close equally the legs, the horse would not move directly to the front; and if he did not close them progressively, the horse would not obey without irregularity.

 

 

TO HALT.

 

90. After some steps, the instructor commands:

 

1. Squad.

   2. HALT.

 

At the command, squad, the trooper gathers his horse, without slackening his pace.

At the command, HALT, the trooper braces himself in the saddle; elevate the wrists at the same time by degrees, and dose the legs in order to prevent the horse from receding. The horse having obeyed, replace the wrists and the legs by degrees.

 


TROOPER MOUNTED.

 

TO TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TO THE LEFT,

FROM A HALT

 

91.—The instructor commands:

 

1. To the right, (or To the left.)

2. MARCH.

3. HALT.

 

At the command, to the right, gather the horse.

At the command, MARCH, open the right rein, and close progressively the legs, until the horse moves. In order not to turn the horse too short, perform the movement upon a quarter circle 3 paces round.

At the command, HALT, elevate slightly the wrists, and hold the legs near, in order to keep the horse straight in the new direction; replace the wrists and the legs by degrees.

 

TO TURN ABOUT TO THE RIGHT, AND TO THE

LEFT, FROM A HALT.

 

93.—The instructor commands:

1. Right about, (or Left about.)

2. MARCH.

3. HALT.

 

This movement is executed on the principles prescribed for the turn to the right, or to the left; but the horse passes over a semicircle of 6 paces, and faces to the rear.

94—In order to make the trooper comprehend better the movements detailed, Nos. 91 and 93, the instructor places himself at the shoulder of the horse, and describes each movement on foot, in marking off the arc of the pre­scribed circle.

 

TO MAKE A THIRD OF A TURN TO THE RIGHT

AND TO THE LEFT, FROM A HALT.

 

95.—The instructor commands:

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

1. Right oblique, (or left oblique.)

2. MARCH.

3. HALT.

 

At the command, right oblique, gather the horse.

At the command, MARCH, open a little the right rein, and close slightly the legs, in order to make the horse execute a third of a turn to the right.

The command HALT follows immediately; elevate slightly the wrists, and close the legs, to keep the oblique direction; replace the wrists and legs by degrees.

96. —The movements detailed, Nos. 91, 93, and 95, after having been executed to the right, are executed to the left, according to the same principles, but by inverse means.

 

 

TO REIN BACK, AND TO CEASE REINING BACK.

 

97.—The instructor commands:

 

I.       Backwards.

2.       MARCH.

3.       Squad.

4.      HALT.

 

At the command, backwards, gather the horse.

At the command, MARCH, close the legs, and at the mo­ment the horse lifts a leg elevate the wrists, with a stronger feel of the mouth. As soon as the horse obeys, lower and elevate successively the wrists, which is called yielding and checking. If the horse throws the haunches to the right, close the right leg; if he throws them to the left, close the left leg. If these means are not sufficient to replace the horse in his proper position, open the rein on the side towards which the horse throws his haunches, causing him to feel, at the same time, slightly the effect of the opposite rein.

At the command, squad, the trooper prepares to stop.

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

At the command, HALT, lower the wrists and close the legs. The horse having obeyed, replace the wrists and the legs by degrees.

 

TO FILE OFF.

 

98.—The squad being dismounted as prescribed, No 81, the instructor commands

 

1. By the right (or by the left)—FILE OFF.

2. MARCH.

 

At the command, FILE OFF, hook up the sabre, (when in use,) and unhook the curb; retake the reins with the right hand, and replace the left hand at the side.

At the command, MARCH, the trooper of the right steps off with the left foot, leading his horse to the front; he takes 4 steps, turns to the right, and marches in the new direction, holding at the same time the hand high and firm to prevent the horse from jumping. Each trooper exe­cutes successively the same movement when the one who precedes him has moved 4 paces to the front.

The troopers conform to the same principles to file off by the left.

 

SECOND LESSON.

 

99.—The instructor may unite for this lesson 8 troopers, hut not more; they are placed on the same line 3 paces apart; they are without spurs; the horses are saddled and in the snaffle.

Two corporals, or instructed troopers, are designated to be conductors; they are placed on the right and on the left of the troopers.

The instruction is divided into several stages, commencing alternately by the right and by the left.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

MARCH TO THE LEFT HAND.

 

100. —The instructor commands:

 

1. To the right (or to the left.)

2. MARCH.

 

At these commands the troopers conform to what is prescribed in order to execute a turn to the right from a halt, No 91; then lowering the wrists and closing the legs, march straight forward, and follow the conductor.

At the extremity of the riding-house the conductor turns to the right; the troopers follow, having between them the distance of 4 feet from head to croup.

101.—The trooper “marches to the right hand, when he has the right side towards the interior of the riding-house. He marches to the left hand when it is the left side.

The instructor follows the troopers, keeping on the inside of the track.

He observes that their seat is not deranged, and warns them to conform with suppleness to all the motions of the horse.

Passing from one trooper to another, he occupies himself successively with all the details of the position of each, so as to instruct without confusing them.

 

 

TO TURN TO THE RIGHT, AND TO THE LEFT, IN MARCHING.

 

102.—The troopers follow the conductor, and make, on arriving at the angles of the riding-house, a turn to the right (or to the left) in marching. To turn to the right or left in marching, the trooper opens the rein to the side toward, which the turn Is made, and closes both legs, the outer one most.

 


TROOPER, DISMOUNTED.

 

TO HALT, AND TO STEP OFF.

 

103.—The troopers marching in column on one of the long sides, the instructor commands

 

1. Squad.

2. HALT.

 

The troopers stop as prescribed, No. 90.

104.—To recommence the march, the instructor commands:

 

1.          Forward.

2.          MARCH.

 

The troopers move forward as prescribed, No 90. The instructor causes the squad frequently to stop and to move off, to habituate the troopers in conducting their horses. He observes that they do not incline the body too much forward at the moment of stopping, and that they do not lean back at the moment of starting. When the troopers have stopped, he rectifies their position.

 

 

TO PASS FROM THE WALK TO THE TROT, AND FROM THE TROT TO THE WALK.

 

105.—The troopers becoming habituated to the movement of the horse, the instructor causes them to pass to the trot.  When they are in column upon one of the long sides, he commands:

 

1. Trot.

2. MARCH.

 

At the command, trot, gather the horse without increasing his gait.

At the command, MARCH, lower a little the wrists, and

 


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close the legs more or less, according to the sensibility of the horse. As soon as the horse obeys, replace the wrists and the legs by degrees.

106.— The instructor employs this gait at first cautiously, and at a moderate trot, that the men may not lose their position.

He makes them understand that it is in remaining well seated, and in relaxing, measurably, all the parts of the body, especially the thighs and legs, that they can acquire the necessary ease and solidity. He observes also that they do not bear too much upon the reins in this gait.

When he perceives that their position is deranged, he causes them to resume the walk, and even to stop.

107.—To pass from the trot to the walk, the instructor com­mands:

 

1. Walk.

2. MARCH.

 

At the command, walk, gather the horse without affecting his gait.

At the command, MARCH, elevate the wrists by degrees, and hold the legs near, in order to prevent the horse from stopping. As soon as the horse obeys, replace the wrist and the legs by degrees.

 

CHANGES OF HAND.

 

108. —When the troopers have marched some time to the right hand, (or to the left hand,) to make them change hands, in the breadth of the riding-house, without stopping, the instructor commands:

 

Right (or left)—TURN.

 

At the command, TURN, the conductor turns to the right, and crosses the riding-house in its breadth, followed by the troopers.

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

The conductor being at two paces from the opposite track, the instructor commands:

 

1. Left (or right) —TURN.

 

At the command. turn, the conductor turns to the left, and follows the track.

All the other troopers turn successively on the same ground. The instructor causes these changes of hand to be exe­cuted at a walk, and at a trot.

109.—The instructor occasionally orders the reins carried together in the left hand; when so held, the trooper, in order to turn to the right, carries the hand forward and to the right; to turn to the left, he carries the hand forward and to the left, the nails always downward.

 

 

TO TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TO THE LEFT BY TROOPER, IN MARCHING.

 

110.—The troopers marching in column, and having arrived about the middle of one of the long sides, the in­structor commands:

1. To the right (or to the left.)

2. MARCH.

At the command, to the right, gather the horse.

At the command, MARCH, each trooper executes a turn to the right in marching, and moves straight to the front.

The troopers being at two paces from the opposite track, the instructor commands:

 

1. To the right (or to the left.)

2. MARCH.

At the command, MARCH, each trooper executes a turn to the right, following the same principles; and all return to the track.

The same movements are repeated to resume the order in which the troopers were originally.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

TO TURN-ABOUT TO THE RIGHT AND TO THE LEFT BY TROOPER, IN MARCHING ON THE SAME LINE.

 

111.—The troopers having made a turn to the right, as has just been explained, and having arrived near the opposite track, the instructor commands:

1, Right-about (or Left-about.)

2. MARCH.

At the command, right-about, gather the horse.

At the command, MARCH, each trooper executes a turn-about to the right in marching, following the principles pre­scribed, No. 102, and moves directly to the front

The instructor gives the command MARCH, at the moment the troopers are within 2 paces of the track; the troopers are then reformed in column upon the opposite track, by the movement of to the right (or to the left.)

 

 

TO TURN-ABOUT TO THE RIGHT AND TO THE LEFT BY TROOPER, IN MARCHING IN COLUMN.

 

112—The troopers marching in column, and the conductor having arrived near the end of one of the long sides of the riding-house, the instructor commands:

 

1.  Right-about (or Left-about.)

2.            MARCH.

 

At the command, right-about, gather the horse.

At the command, MARCH, each trooper executes a turn-about to the right in marching, and moves forward

On arriving at the opposite short side, the conductor turns to the left without command; the squad returns to the order in which it was originally, in executing the in­verse movement.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TROOPER, DISMOUNTED.

 

113—The object of the turns to the right, to the left, right about, and left-about, in this lesson, is to habituate the troopers to turning in all directions their horses; the Instructor causes these movements to be executed at a walk only, he not only observes the squad generally, but watches and rectifies with the greatest care the means employed by each trooper in turning his horse.

In the instruction to the right hand, the turns to the right, and right-about, are executed and in the work to the left hand, those to the left, and left-about. When the troopers have become accustomed to these movements, the instruc­tor causes them to be executed in returning to the tracks, by turns to the right or to the left, without having regard to the change of hand.

114.—To rest the squad, the instructor causes the troopers to turn to the right, or to the left, when they are about the middle of one of the long sides of the riding-house, and gives the command, HALT, when they are out of the track.

The instruction Is re-commenced by a turn to the right or to the left.

To terminate the drill, the Instructor commands the troopers to dismount, and file off.

 

THIRD LESSON.

 

115.—When the troopers begin to execute this lesson correctly, the instructor changes their horses each day of the instruction, to give them the habit of managing differ­ent horses.

During the rests, the instructor exercises the troopers in vaulting on and from their horses, without commands, and without using the stirrups.

To leap to the ground; the trooper, holding the reins of the snaffle as prescribed, No 82, seizes with the left hand a lock of the mane, the fingers well closed; places the right hand upon the pommel, raises himself upon the wrists, brings the right thigh to the side of the left, remains an instant in this position, and descends lightly to the ground.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

To leap on the horse: the trooper seizes the mane with the left hand, places the right hand upon the pommel of the saddle, springs up, raising himself upon the two wrists, remains an instant in this position, and places himself lightly in the saddle.

All the movements in this lemon are explained in detail by the right: they are executed by the left according to the same principles, but by inverse means

116.—From 12 to 16 troopers are united, and wear spurs.

The horses are saddled, and in the snaffle.

The troopers are placed with the horses at 1 foot from each other. Corporals or instructed troopers are placed one on the right, one in the middle of the rank; and it would be well to have one on each flank of the two divisions.

The instructor makes the troopers count off by fours, as prescribed, No. 197; he then orders them to mount.

 

OF THE SPUR.

 

117——The instructor explains to the troopers the use and the effect of the spur

If the horse does not obey the legs, it is necessary to em­ploy the spur.

The spur is sometimes used to chastise when necessary, use it vigorously, and at the moment the horse commits the fault.

In order to use the spur, it is necessary to keep steady the body, the waist, and the wrists; to cling to the horse with the thighs, and the calves of the legs; turn the point of the feet a little out; lower a little the wrists; press the spurs close behind the girths, without moving the body replace then the wrists and the legs by degrees.

When the troopers employ the spur, the instructor ob­serves that they do not bear too upon much upon the reins, which would counteract the effect of the spur. He also observes that the troopers do not use the spur unnecessa­rily.


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TROOPER,DISMOUNTED.

 

118.—To conduct the squad to the riding-house, the instructor commands:

 

1. By file to the right, (or to the left)

2. MARCH.

 

At the command, By file to the right, gather the horse.

At the command, MARCH, the trooper on the right exe­cutes a turn to the right, and moves forward; this movement Is executed by all the other troopers successively.

 

 

TO MARCH TO THE RIGHT HAND, AND TO

THE LEFT HAND.

 

119.—On reaching the opposite side of the riding-house, the instructor commands, right—TURN.When the squad is making a turn from the long to a short side of the riding-house, the instructor halts the half of the squad in rear, with a corporal at its head, at the angle, and orders it to wove forward, when the leader of the first half of the squad reaches the diagonal angle.

The troopers preserve the distance of 4 feet from head to croup.

The conductors regulate the pace of their horses so as to arrive at the same time at the opposite angles of the riding. house, the conductor of the second division regulating him. self on him of the first.

The instructor observes that the position of the troopers becomes more and more regular; that they march at a free and even pace; that they keep their horses straight and look constantly before them In order to maintain them­selves in the direction of the conductors; that they pre­serve their distances, and recover them gradually when lost.

120.—The Instructor reminds the troopers of the principIes prescribed, No. 102, to turn to the right or to the left,

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

and directs them to gather their horses a little before arriv­ing at each corner.

The horses should not enter the corners too far, neither should they commence to turn too soon. To pass a corner to the right, a turn to the right is executed; to pass a corner to the left, a turn to the left is executed in marching; the troopers should act as if there were no walls; and as the movement of each one should be independent of the trooper who has gone before, their hands and legs alone should de­termine the horse to go to the right or to the left.

 

 

TO PASS FROM THE WALK TO THE TROT, AND FROM THE TROT TO THE WALK.

 

121.—The troopers marching in column upon the long sides, the instructor causes them to commence the trot.

Whenever the change is made from a slow gait to one more rapid, as from the walk to the trot, it is necessary to commence slowly, and increase it gradually to the degree prescribed.

The troopers marching In column at the trot upon the long sides, the instructor causes them to pass to the walk.

Whenever the change is made from a lively gait to one more slow, as from the trot to the walk, it is necessary to commence the last gait gradually.

The squad passes frequently from the walk to the trot, and from the trot to the walk, in order to accustom the troopers to the changes of gait.

 

CHANGE OF DIRECTION IN THE BREADTH OF THE RIDING-HOUSE.

 

122.—The instructor causes the change of direction In the breadth of the riding-house, as prescribed for the changes of hand, No. 108. taking cure to give the com­mand in sufficient time to prevent the columns from meet­ing at the end of the change of direction.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

The change of direction ought to be executed so as neither to stop nor check the rear of the column; the troopers, and particularly the conductors, ought to turn without slackening the pace, aiding themselves not only with their bands, but also with their legs.

 

CHANGE OF DIRECTION OBLIQUELY BY

TROOPER.

 

123.—The squad changes direction in the length of the riding-house; and as soon as all the troopers have turned, and are in the same direction, the instructor commands:

1. Column.

2. HALT.

 

The troopers stop at the same time, keeping their horses straight and at their distances.

The instructor causes the troopers to make an oblique turn to the right or to the left from a halt, as prescribed.— No. 95.

This movement being executed, the Instructor assures himself of the exactness of the directions and the intervals, and then commands:

 

1. Squad,

2.     MARCH.

 

The troopers march at the same gait, each in the direc­tion he has taken.

When they arrive at 1 foot from the track, the instructor commands:

 

FORWARD.

 

At this command, make an oblique turn to the left in advancing, in order to follow the track.

The instructor causes these movements to be repeated without halting; for this purpose, alter having commenced

 

 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

the change of direction in the length of the riding-house, as soon as the two ranks are in column, he commands:

1. Right (or Left) oblique.

2, MARCH.

1. FORWARD.

 

At the command, right oblique, gather the horse.

At the command, MARCH, execute an oblique turn to the right; having taken this direction, keep the legs equally near, and march straight forward at the same gait.

At the command, FORWARD, turn to the original direction on the track.

 

TO MARCH IN A CIRCLE.

 

124.—When the conductors have passed about a third of the long sides, the instructor commands:

1. In circle to the right, (or left.)

2. MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, the conductors turn to ride on circles, touching the two tracks of the long sides; the troopers exactly following them.

Every horse should bend to the curve he is to pass over; the trooper keeps him in its direction by the inner rein, supporting him, at the same time, with the outer leg.

To resume the direct march, when the conductors are at the track, the instructor commands:

 

FORWARD.

 

125.—To reunite the troopers in order to conduct them to the quarters, the instructor causes them to close to the distance of 2 feet.

The column having arrived in the yard of the quarters, the instructor commands:

1. Left into line.

2. MARCH.

3. HALT.

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

At the first command, MARCH, the first trooper turns to the left and moves straight forward.

At the command, HALT, the trooper stops.

All the other troopers execute a turn to the left succes­sively, when they are nearly opposite the place they are to occupy in the rank, and halt abreast of it.

To terminate the exercise, the instructor gives the com­mand to dismount, and to file off, as prescribed, No. 98.

 

FOURTH LESSON.

 

TO TURN TO THE RIGHT OR TO THE LEFT,

BY TROOPER, IN MARCHING.

 

126.—.The instructor causes this movement to be executed as prescribed, No. 110, at the commands: 1. To the right; 2. MARCH; observing that the troopers marching in two columns, the preparatory command ought to be given so as to command MARCH at the moment the conductors arrive opposite to the last trooper but one of the other column.

The troopers move straight forward, preserving their gait and their direction, so that each one may find before him the interval and the place he is to occupy in the column on the opposite track.

In passing into the intervals, the legs should be kept near, to prevent the horse slackening his gait.

The instructor attaches much less importance to the uni­formity of these movements than to the manner in which each trooper conducts his horse.

This is executed also at the trot.

 

 

TO TURN ABOUT TO THE RIGHT, OR TO THE LEFT, THE TROOPERS MARCHING ON THE SAME LINE, (OR ABREAST.)

 

127.—The instructor causes these movements to be exe-
SCHOOL OF THE

 

cuted as prescribed, No. 111, the troopers of the two divisions passing by the intervals at the middle of the riding­ house.

 

 

TO TURN ABOUT TO THE RIGHT, OR TO THE LEFT, THE TROOPERS MARCHING IN COLUMN.

 

12~—-The instructor causes these movements to be exe­cuted as prescribed, No. 112.

In each column, the last trooper, who becomes the head of the column, should pay attention not to slacken the gait in making his movement, in order not to retard the others.

This principle is equally applicable to the troopers who take the head of the columns in re-entering upon the tracks.

 

 

TO PASS SUCCESSIVELY FROM THE HEAD TO THE REAR OF THE COLUMN.

 

129. —To make the troopers masters of their horses, to force them to use both the reins and the legs also, to accustom the horses to leaving each other, the instructor requires the troopers to pass from the head to the rear of the column; each one, becoming in his turn conductor, regulates himself accordingly.

This movement is executed successively in the two col­umns, at a simple warning from the instructor, by two right about (or left about) turns.

The trooper designated to pass to the rear of the column gathers his horse and executes the movement in advancing so as not to retard those who are behind him. He holds the outer leg near, in order not to describe a semicircle of more than 6 paces; he marches then parallel to the column, and when he has re-entered upon the track by a second turn, he closes to the distance of 4 feet from the last trooper.

The trooper who follows and who becomes conductor

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

should gather his horse and direct him with the outer rein and the inner leg, to prevent his following the horse which has left the column.

The instructor also requires the troopers to leave the column, without commencing at the head. In this case, he directs the troopers who follow the one designated to close to the prescribed distance; or if he thinks proper, in order to habituate the troopers to holding in their horses, he causes the place of the absent trooper to continue vacant.

When the troopers have been thus misplaced, the in­structor halts the squad, and directs each trooper to return to his place before passing to another movement.

 

BEING HALTED, TO COMMENCE THE MOVE

AT A TROT.

 

130.—The troopers being in column upon the long sides, the instructor commands:

 

1. Forward, trot.

2. MARCH.

 

At the command, trot, gather the horse.

At the command, MARCH, lower the wrists and close the legs progressively; as soon as the horse obeys, replace the wrists and the legs by degrees.

 

MARCHING AT A TROT, TO HALT.

 

131.—The troopers marching at a trot, and in column, upon the long sides, the instructor commands:

 

1.          Column.

2.          HALT.

 

At the command, column, gather the horse.

At the command, HALT, elevate the wrists by degrees, until the horse stops; and hold the legs always near, to keep him straight and to prevent his stepping back. The

 

 


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horse having obeyed, replace the wrists and the legs by degrees.

The instructor requires all the troopers to set off freely at the trot, at the command MARCH, and to stop all together without jostling, at the command HALT.

 

TO PASS FROM THE TROT TO THE TROT-OUT, AND FROM THE TROT-OUT TO THE TROT.

 

132.—The troopers marching at the trot, and in column upon the long sides, the instructor commands:

 

Trot--OUT.

 

At this command, lower a little the wrists and close the legs progressively as soon as the horse obeys, replace the wrists and the legs by degrees.

The gait being lengthened to a suitable degree, the instructor sees that the troopers keep their horses up to it.

He pays particular attention to the position of the troop­ers. He reminds them that it is in holding the body erect, having a light hand, the loins supple, an(l in allowing the thighs and legs to fall naturally, they can diminish the effect of the reactions of the horse, and conform more readily to all his motions.

To prevent the horses from overreaching, it is necessary to raise the wrists and close more or less the legs.

The lengthened gait is executed only during one or two turns towards each hand; in continuing it longer, the horses lose their steadiness, and the equality of their gaits Is destroyed

To pass from the trot-out to the trot, the instructor com­mands:

SLOW TROT.

 

At this command, elevate the wrists by degrees and close the legs, to prevent the horse from taking the walk; as soon

 

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

as the horse obeys, replace the wrists and the legs by de­grees.

 

TO PASS FROM THE TROT TO THE GALLOP.

 

133.—When the troopers have acquired some suppleness and confidence, and preserve at the trot an easy and regu­lar position, the instructor causes them to make a few turns at the gallop. He does not explain to them at first the mechanism of this gait, neither the means of assuring its regularity he only requires that each trooper accommo­dates himself to the motions of his horse without losing his seat.

Before commencing this exercise, and when the 2d division arrives upon one of the short sides of the riding-house, it is formed, by causing the troopers to FRONT and HALT, as prescribed, No. 125, paying attention to make them move forward 6 paces from the track.

The troopers of the 1st division continue to march, take between them the distance of 4 paces, pass to the trot, and commence successively the gallop, at the indication of the Instructor, as follows:

Riding to the right, on approaching the corner, lengthen the trot, and gather the horse; then feel both reins to the left, and close the right leg; throwing the weight to the left, and leaving the right shoulder entirely free.

The horse having taken the gallop, hold a light hand and the legs near, to keep him at this gait.

After one or two turns at the most, the troopers pass from the gallop to the trot, and from the trot to the walk. The instructor makes them change hand in the breadth of the riding-house, and recommence the same exercise to the left hand. The troopers of the first division are then formed as those of the second, upon the other short side.

The troopers of the 2d division go through with the same exercise.

 

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

TO PASSAGE TO THE RIGHT OR TO THE LEFT,

THE HEAD TO THE WALL.

 

134.—The two columns marching at the walk upon the long sides, the instructor causes to be executed the move­ment to the right, or to the left, as prescribed, No. 126; but he causes the troopers to halt when the horses reach the opposite track, their heads to the wall, and he commands:

 

1. Right (or left) pass.

2.          MARCH.

 

At the command, right pass, bear the shoulders of the horse to the right, in opening a little the right reins.

This movement is only preparatory; it indicates to the trooper that the shoulders of his horse should always commence the march, and precede the movement of the haunches.

At the command, MARCH, open the right rein to incline the horse to the right, closing at the same time the left leg that the haunches may follow, without leaning the body to the left make use of the left rein and the right leg to support the horse and moderate his movement.

After some steps upon the side, the instructor halts the squad.

At the command, HALT, cause to cease insensibly the effect of the right rein and the left leg, employing the opposite rein and leg; straighten the horse and replace the wrists and legs by degrees.

To passage to the left, and to halt, employ the same principles and inverse means.

135—The instructor causes this movement to be executed In the commencement by each man separately, and then by all at the same time. He explains to each one the means to be employed

The trooper should hold his horse obliquely to the track, to render his movement more easy. He ought to com­mence this movement moderately, and look to the side

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

towards which he passes, without inclining the body to the opposite side, which would derange his seat and constrain the movement of the horse.

The horse having obeyed the aids, the trooper should keep up the effect by gentle means.

If the horse steps too quickly to the side towards which the trooper posses, diminish the effect of the right rein and left leg.

If the horse moves forward against the wall, it is neces­sary to diminish the effect of the legs, and increase that of the hands, in yielding and checking the horse alternately.

If, on the contrary, he steps back, it is necessary to in­crease the effect of the legs and diminish that of the hands, inclining always the shoulders of the horse to the side towards which he passes for it is generally the constraint that he experiences when the movement of the shoulders does not precede that of the haunches, which causes him to back.

 

 

TO PASSAGE TO THE RIGHT OR TO THE

LEFT, BEING IN COLUMN.

 

136.—After having executed the passages, the head to the wall, the troopers having returned to the track, and marching to the right hand or to the left hand, the instructor orders a change of direction in the length of the riding-house; and when the two columns are by the side of each other, he halts them and causes them to execute passage to the right (or to the left.)

When the troopers have nearly arrived at the track, the Instructor halts them again.

The horses being quieted, he orders the passage to the left, and each trooper returns to the place he occupied before halting in the middle of the riding-house.

When the troopers have reached the track, the instructor may, if he thinks proper, cause them to march in column

 


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upon this same track, in order not to keep the hones too long at the movement of passing.

137.— When the troopers have passed the hand to the wall, the instructor causes them sometimes to rein back, and to cease reining hack, as prescribed, No 97.

138.—-During the last days of this lesson, the instructor requires, from time to time, the reins to be held in the left hand, so that the troopers, conducting their horses with this hand alone, may be somewhat prepared for the exercises in the curb bridle. He observes that each trooper keeps himself square upon the horse.

139.—Toterminate the lesson, and return to quarters, the Instructor conforms to what is prescribed, No. 125.

140.—The troopers being proficient in the third and fourth lessons, they are repeated without stirrups; these being crossed, altar mounting, in front of the saddle.

 

 

FIFTH LESSON.

 

141.—The same number of troopers are united as for the third lesson.

The horses are saddled and in both curb and snaffle. In all other respects conform to what is prescribed, No. 115, and following.

The troopers are conducted to the riding-house as pre­scribed, No. 118.

In entering the riding-house the instructor conforms to what is prescribed, No. 119; and when the two columns are upon the long sides, and exactly opposite, he com­mands:

 

1. To the right (or to the left.)

2.  MARCH.

3.  HALT.

 

He explains the position of the bridle hand, as prescribed, No. 82.

 

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

TO TAKE THE SNAFFLE IN THE RIGHT

HAND.

 

142.—The Instructor commands:

 

Snaffle—IN THE RIGHT HAND.

 

1 time.

 

At the last part of the command grasp the snaffle at the middle of the reins with all the fingers of the right hand, the nails downward, without lowering the body; hold the reins of the snaffle over those of the curb, and lower the left hand so as not to bear upon the bit.

143.—In using alternately the curb and snaffle, the trooper relieves the bars of the horse’s mouth; he should never use both at the same time.

The troopers are required to take the snaffle in the right hand during the commencement of the exercise in the curb bridle, In order to make the change of position of the rider less abrupt, and to bring up his right side, which is apt to remain in rear.

 

TO DROP THE SNAFFLE.

 

144.—The instructor commands:

 

Drop—SNAFFLE.

 

At the last part of the command, which is SNAFFLE, replace the left hand, and let fail the reins of the snaffle so that they will be under those of the curb, the right hand to the side.

 

THE PRINCIPAL MOVEMENTS OF THE BRI­DLE HAND.

 

In raising slightly the hand and drawing it in to-

 

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

wards the body, the trooper gathers his horse; In drawing it in still more, the gait is made slower. By increasing the effect of the hand, the horse is stopped; if increased still more, the horse is reined back.

In lowering slightly the hand, the horse is at liberty to move forward.

In carrying the hand forward and to the right, the horse is turned to the right.

In carrying the hand forward and to the left, the horse is turned to the left.

As soon as the horse obeys, the bridle hand resumes its original position.

In all the movements of the hand, the arm should act freely, without communicating constraint to the shoulder or body; the effect of the curb being more powerful than that of the snaffle, it should be used progressively, particu­larly in stopping and reining back.

The instructor causes the following movements to be executed by the commands prescribed in the first lesson.

 

TO GATHER THE HORSE.

 

146.—Elevate slightly the hand, drawing it at the same time towards the body, and close the legs.

 

TO MARCH.

 

147.—Lower slightly the hand, the wrist always opposite the middle of the body, and close the legs progressively.

As soon as the horse obeys, replace the hand and legs by degrees.

 

TO HALT.

 

l48.—The trooper braces himself in the saddle: elevate the hand by degrees in drawing it in towards the body, and close the legs to keep the horse straight and prevent him

 

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

from stepping back.  As soon as the horse obeys, replace the hand and the legs by degrees.

 

 

TO TURN TO THE RIGHT IN MARCHING.

 

149—Carry the hand forward and to the right, accord­ing to the sensibility of the horse; close the legs, the left leg the most. The movement being nearly finished, re­place the hand and the legs by degrees.

 

TO TURN TO THE LEFT IN MARCHING.

 

150.—Carry the hand forward and to the left, according to the sensibility of the horse; close the legs, the right leg the most. The movement being nearly finished, replace the hand and legs by degrees.

 

 

TO TURN-ABOUT TO THE RIGHT AND TO THE LEFT MARCHING.

 

151.—The same principles as prescribed to execute a turn to the right, or to the left, observing to pass over a semicircle.

 

 

TO MAKE AN OBLIQUE TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TO THE LEFT MARCHING.

 

152.—The same principles as prescribed to execute a turn to the right, or to the left, observing that the move­ment of the hand does not require the horse to do more than make a third of a turn to the right, or to the left.

 

 

TO REIN BACK, AND TO CEASE REINING BACK.

 

153.—The same principles as prescribed for the halt, ob-

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

serving, as soon as the horse obeys, to lower and raise the hand alternately that the movement may be regular.

To cease reining back, relax the effect of the hand and close the legs; as soon as the horse obeys, replace the hand and the legs by degrees.

154 —The instructor does not require these different movements to he executed simultaneously, but observes particularly the manner in which the trooper employs his bridle hand. He always rectifies its position before passing from one movement to another.

 

 

EXERCISE OF THE FOURTH LESSON WITH

THE CURB BRIDLE

 

155—-When the troopers begin to understand the move­ments of the bridle hand, the instructor causes them to march upon the track, first at the walk, and then at the trot. He requires the squad frequently to halt, to move off, to change direction, and to execute successively the different movements of the fourth lesson, observing that each trooper makes an exact application of the principles prescribed when at a halt.

The habitual fault with the troopers being to carry the left hand forward, and to throw back the right shoulder, the instructor is particular in requiring them to keep the hand above the pommel of the saddle without deranging the position of the body.

 

 

TO PASSAGE TO THE RIGHT, AND TO THE LEFT.

 

156.—The Instructor causes the squad to passage to the right, and to the left, the head to the wall and in column.

To passage to the right, bear the shoulders of the horse to the right, by inclining the hand to the right, at the same time bear sufficiently on the bit to prevent the horse

 

 

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

from moving forward; close the left leg that the haunches will follow, keep the right leg near, to sustain the horse.

In order to cease passaging, straighten the horse, hold the right leg near, and replace the hand and the legs by degrees.

To passage to the left, and to cease passaging, employ the same principles, but inverse means.

 

 

SIXTH LESSON.

 

PRINCIPLES OF THE GALLOP.

 

157.—A horse gallops on the right foot, when the right fore and hind leg move in advance of the left fore and hind leg. This gait Is generally divided Into three distinct times or treads. The 1st time is marked by the left hind foot, which reaches the ground first; the 2d by the left fore and right hind foot, which touch at the .me instant; and the 3d by the right fore foot.

A horse gallops on the left foot when the left fore and

hind leg move in advance of the right fore and hind leg. In this case, the right hind foot first reaches the ground. then the right fore and left hind foot, and lastly the left fore foot.

A horse gallops true when he gallops on the right foot, in exercising or turning to the right hand, and on the left foot, in exercising or turning to the left hand.

A horse gallops false when he gallops on the left toot, in exercising or turning tothe right hand, and on the right foot, In exercising or turning to the left hand.

A horse Is “disunited” when he gallops with the near fore leg followed by the off hind leg, or with the off fore leg followed by the near hind leg.

When the horse is disunited, the trooper experiences in his position Irregular movements; the centre of gravity of the horse Is deranged, and his strength impaired.

 

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

EXERCISE AT THE GALLOP UPON RIGHT

LINES.

 

158.—When the troopers preserve in the 4th lesson their proper position at the gallop, they are taught to move off on a straight line to either hand

After the troopers of the 2d division are formed, as pre­scribed, No 133, the instructor causes the men of the front rank to take the distance of 4 paces from each other; these troopers marching to the right hand upon one of the long bides, the instructor commands

 

1. Gallop.

2. MARCH.

 

At the command, GALLOP, gather the horse, increasing the pressure of the legs, and restraining him with the reins.

At the command. MARCH, carry the hand slightly to the left, feeling both reins equally, to enable the right shoulder to move in advance of the left, and close the right leg. The horse having obeyed, hold a light hand and the legs near, to keep him al his gait. To make him gallop on the left foot inverse means are used.

159.—The instructor requires the troopers to be calm, to conduct their horses with mildness, and particularly to pre­serve a light hand that the gallop may be free and regular.

During the first days of the exercise at the gallop, the troopers are required to take the reins of the snaffle in the right hand, in order to calm their horses; this is discon­tinued when they have acquired the habit of managing them with the curb bridle alone.

To preserve the movement of the horse true, it is neces­sary for the trooper to accommodate himself to all his motions, particularly in passing the corners, where the slightest derangement in the seat would render the action of the horse irregular.

When a horse gallops false, if to the right, the trooper will feel both reins to the left, in order to bring his weight

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

to that side, the horse’s head remaining bent to the right, and close firmly his left leg, to bring his haunches in again, and then as in No. 158.

160—The troopers are permitted to make only a turn or two at the gallop to each hand, and always required to pass to the trot, or walk in order to change hand.

When the horses have become quiet, and the troopers begin to manage them well, the distance between them is gradually diminished to 4 feet.

2d division is carried through the same exercise, and then both at the same time.

 

EXERCISE AT THE GALLOP ON THE CIRCLE.

 

161.—When the troopers have been sufficiently exercised at the gallop upon straight lines, the instructor causes them make a few turns on the circle, following the principles prescribed, No. 124

This exercise is commenced on very large circles; the liameter is diminished as the troopers become more skilful.

To terminate the lesson, and return to the quarters, con­form to what is prescribed, No. 125.

 

SEVENTH LESSON.

 

162.—The same number of troopers compose the squad is for the 6th lesson; they have their arms.

The instructor is mounted.  He has an assistant instructor. The assistant instructor, also mounted, is armed like the troopers, in order to execute the manual of arms, as given in detail by the instructor.

 

EXERCISE OF THE SIXTH LESSON, WITH THE

SABRE ONLY.

 

163.—The first days of the  7th lesson are employed in repeating all the movements of the 6th, the troopers being

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

armed with the sabre on]y. The troopers are then furnished with all the arms. Before commencing the manual of arms, a few movements at the walk and the trot are executed, in order to calm the horses; during the remainder of the lesson, the exercise at a halt is interrupted by movements at the different gaits. The instructor requires them to be executed with the greatest regularity, so that the troopers, in learning to manage their arms, perfect themselves at the same time in conducting their horses.

 

MANUAL OF ARMS AT A HALT.

 

164.—The troopers are formed by the commands FRONT and HALT, as prescribed, No. 125, and are 4 Inches from knee to knee.

The instructor commands:

 

Draw-SABRE

 

2 times.

 

165.—1. At the command, DRAW, incline slightly the head to the left, carry the right hand above the reins, engage the wrist In the sword-knot, seize the gripe, disengage the blade 6 Inches from the scabbard, and turn the head to the front.

2.    At the command, SABRE, draw quickly the sabre, raising the arm to its full length at an angle of 45 degrees, the sabre in a straight line with the arm; hold the sabre In this position an instant, then carry It to the right shoulder, the back of the blade supported against the hollow of the shoulder, the wrist upon the top of the thigh, the little finger on the outside of the gripe.

 

Present—SABRE.

 

1 time.

 

166.—At the command SABRE, carry the sabre up and to

 

 


 

 

 

Par. 168

 

TROOPER, MOUNTED

the front, the thumb opposite to and 6 inches from the neck, the blade perpendicular, the edge to the left, the thumb along the right side of the gripe, the little finger joined to the other three.

 

Carry—SABRE.

 

1 time.

 

167 -—At the command, SABRE, replace the sabre, the back of the blade supported against the hollow ofthe shoulder, the wrist upon the upper part of the thigh, the little finger outside of the gripe.

 

Charge—SABRE

 

1 time, 2 motions.

 

168.—1. At the command, SABRE, raise the hand in tierce as high as the right ear and 7 inches from it, the right shoulder and elbow well back, the thumb on the back of the gripe, the point of the sabre to the front and slightly below the horizontal, the edge up.

2. Thrust to the front, the edge up, the arm at Its full extent.

Carry—SABRE.

 

1 time.

 

169.—At the command, SABRE, draw back the arm and replace the sabre as in No. 165.

 

Return—SABRE.

 

2 times.

 

170.—1. At the command, RETURN, execute the movement of present sabre.

 

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

2.    At the command, SABRE, carry the wrist opposite to and 6 inches from the left shoulder, lower the blade in passing it near the left arm, the point to the rear, raising at the same time the right hand; incline the head slightly to the left, and fix the eyes upon the mouth of the scabbard; return the blade, disengage the wrist from the sword-knot, turn the head to the front

The instructor commands:

 

Draw —PISTOL.

 

171.—This is executed as prescribed, No. 62.

 

 

TO FIRE THE PISTOL.

 

The Instructor commands:

 

READY.

 

172.—This Is executed as in No. 63.

 

AIM.

 

1 time.

 

173.—This Is executed as in No. 64.

 

FIRE.

 

1 time.

 

174.—At this command, FIRE, and raise pistol.

175.—At the position of aim, the instructor may com· wand, raise—PISTOL; the men will raise the pistol to the position No. 62. If the pistol is not fired, at the command return--pistol, first let down the hammer.

176.--To cock the pistol rapidly, without the use of the left hand, whilst pressing back the hammer with the right

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

thumb, to assist its action throw forward the muzzle with a quick motion.

 

 

TO LOAD THE PISTOL.

 

The horses must be quiet; at the position of raise—pistol, the instructor commands:

 

Load at—WILL.

 

At this command, let the reins rest on the pommel, half cock the pistol, take it by the stock with the left hand, the guard to the right, and lower it until the hand rests upon the inner side of the left thigh, the butt of the pistol touch­ing the saddle, the hand and cylinder resting against the side of the pommel, the pistol being inclined to the front and right; with the right hand take a cartridge and place it in a chamber, turn the cylinder and force in the ball; repeat this until all the chambers are loaded. Then hold pistol against the right side of the pommel, pointing downward, to the right and front, and put on the caps.  Take the position of raise--pistol.

 

Return—PISTOL.

 

178—At the command, PISTOL, place it in the holster, and button the flap

The manual of a second pistol carried in a saddle holster is the same; where it is furnished, the manual mounted applies to it; and it will be the first used.

 

 

INSPECTION OF ARMS.

 

179.—The instructor commands:

 

Inspection—PISTOL.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

1. At the command, PISTOL, draw the pistol and take the position, raise—pistol.

2 Lower the pistol into the left hand, to half cock It, then hold it by the right hand vertical, guard to the left, about three inches above the bridle hand, in front of the middle of the body; the right fore-arm touching the side.

3.    Place the pistol in the bridle hand, to let down the hammer, return it to the holster or belt, button the flap, and bring the right hand to the side.

The instructor commands:

 

Inspection—SABRE.

 

1 time, 7 motions.

 

180.—1. At the command, SABRE, execute the first time of draw sabre.

2.Execute the second time of draw sabre.

3.    Present sabre.

4. Move the thumb to the back of the gripe, turn it in the hand, the edge turning by the front to the right.

5 Carry sabre.

6.     Execute the first time of return sabre.

7.Return the sabre.

181.—When troopers execute correctly the inspection of arms, they are exercised at it without detail, at the com­mand:

 

Inspection—ARMS.

 

At this command the troopers execute the first and second motions of inspection of pistol.

As soon as the inspector has passed the man on his left, each trooper executes the third motion of inspection of pistol, and the first and second motions of inspection of sabre.

Each trooper, as the inspector reaches him the second time, executes the third and fourth motions of inspection of sabre.

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.  

 

As soon as the inspector has passed the next man on his left he executes the fifth, sixth, and seventh motions of inspection of sabre, the inspector governs himself as in No. 73.

 

SABRE EXERCISE, AT A HALT.

 

The troopers marching at a walk in two columns, the instructor causes them to take the distance of two paces from another, and when the two columns are on the long side, he commands: 1. To the right, (or left.) 2. MARCH. 3. HALT. He causes them to exercise the sabre exercise, as taught on foot.

 

EIGHTH LESSON.

 

MANUAL OF ARMS, IN MARCHING.

 

183.—The troopers are required to draw sabre, and to return sabre, while marching in column at a walk.

The instructor observes that neither the seat nor the po­sition of the bridle-hand is deranged. He also requires the troopers to keep the legs near, in order to prevent the horses from slackening the gait. When the troopers have the sabre drawn, the instructor observes that they do not throw back the right shoulder.

As the troopers become more skilful, they are required to draw sabre, in marching first at the trot, and then at the gallop. They also take the position of charge sabre, in marching at the different gaits.

The sabres are returned in marching At a walk; for this purpose the troopers are directed to support the back of the blade against the left arm, until the point has entered the scabbard.

The troopers are exercised, sabres drawn, in turning to the right and to the left at the trot and at the gallop, and to the right-­about and left-about at the trot only.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

SABRE EXERCISE AT ALL GAITS.

 

184.—The troopers execute progressively, at the different gaits, the exercise of the sabre, taking care to preserve be­tween each other a distance of 2 paces.

 

LEAPING.

 

185.—For this exercise the width of the ditch should be from 3 to 5 feet, and the height of the bar or fence from 1 to 3feet. The width and height of each are increased as the troopers and horses become more habituated to leaping.

The instructor forms the squad 30 spaces in rear of the obstacle.

At the warning of the instructor, each trooper moves off at a walk, directs his march towards the obstacle, and at a third of the way commences the trot.

 

 

TO LEAP THE DITCH.

 

186.—On arriving near the ditch, give the hand and close the legs, to force the horse to make the leap. The moment he reaches the ground, raise slightly the hand in order to sustain him.

 

 

TO LEAP THE FENCE.

 

187.—On arriving near the obstacle, rein up the horse slightly and close the legs. At the moment of making the leap, give the hand, and elevate it slightly as soon as he reaches the ground on the other side.

The trooper, in leaping, should cling to the horse with the thighs and calves of the legs, taking care to lean a little forward as the horse is in the act of springing, and to

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

seat himself well by leaning to the rear at the moment the horse reaches the ground.

188. —Each trooper, after having made the leap, continues to move at the trot, and takes his place in the rank which is formed 30 paces beyond the obstacle, taking care to pass to the walk just before halting.

During the first days of this exercise the troopers leap without arms; the horses ridden on the snaffle.

When the troopers have leaped without arms, they repeat the same exercise with arms, and finally with the sabre drawn.

The horses employed in the school of the trooper should be trained and accustomed to leaping. If, however, a horse refuses to leap, the instructor aids the trooper with the whip.

 

INDIVIDUAL CHARGE.

 

189.—To exercise the troopers at the charge, they conducted to the extremity of a ground which presents a course of sufficient extent without obstacle. There they formed in line and required to draw the sabre.

The instructor places himself 150 paces in front of the right of the troopers; a corporal, 60 paces further; and a corporal or trooper, 20 paces beyond him; he serves as the point of direction for the trooper on the right.

The assistant instructor remains at the point of depar­ture, to see that the troopers move off one after another, and repeat to them what they are required to do.

To execute well the charge, the troopers should be careful to march straight forward, not to change the gait before arriving at the points indicated, and to increase or diminish ­the gait calmly.

Eacb trooper marches 15 paces, and takes the trot.

Having trotted 50 paces, the assistant instructor com­mands the gallop

When he reaches the instructor, the latter commands:

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

CHARGE.

 

At this command, quicken the gallop to nearly full speed, keeping the horse at the same time under control ; bear upon the stirrup, and take the position of CHARGE SABRE.

Abreast of the corporal the trooper retakes the trot and carries the sabre.

At 10 paces from the second corporal he takes the walk, and halts abreast of him.

All the other troopers execute successively the same movement, the assistant instructor causing each one to set off when the trooper who precedes him has halted. Each trooper takes for his point of direction the place he is to occupy in the rank, and places himself on the left of the troopers already formed.

190.—The first charge being completed, the instructor breaks the squad by file to the right, and reforms in facing to the rear, by the commands FRONT and HALT.

The troopers then charge in the opposite direction on the same principles

191. —The charge should be executed only twice the same day. It usually terminates the exercise; after exe­cuting it the squad marches at a walk a sufficient time to enable the horses to become calm before entering the stables.

 

 

CIRCLING ON THE FOREHAND AND HAUNCHES, AND DEMI-PIROUETTE.

 

192.—The troopers are now taught on instructed horses to circle on the forehand and haunches, and the demi­-pirouette, conforming to Article 7, Title 1st, all of which article they are made to understand and practice.

The practice of new horses at the paces for maneuvre is made useful fur the instruction of the recruits, as well as for their practice in riding.

 


TROOPER, MOUNTED.

 

TARGET PRACTICE.

193.—For the target practice on horseback, the target

should be 8 feet high and 3 feet broad; at 6 feet of its height it is marked with a black band 3 inches wide, with a square at its centre—white.

The troopers are first practiced at 10 paces, firing at a halt, to the front, right, left, and rear.

In firing to the front, aim directly over the horse’s head, as in that position a smaller mark is presented to an enemy, and the trooper’s person is partly covered by the horse.

The distance is Increased to 20, 30, 40, and to 50 paces.

Afterwards the troopers are exercised, at the same dis­tances, at the walk.

In firing the troopers must not halt, or at all change gait or direction.

They are then practiced at the same kind of target, and on the same principles at the trot.

For the most advanced practice, a cylindrical post, 12 inches in diameter, and 8 feet high, will be used as a target, a barrier will extend out 12 feet, so as to require the trooper in passing to ride rather more than that distance in a line with the target, and parellel with the track, a small post will be set up, 10 paces on each side.

The troopers will first be exercised a little at a walk. and at a trot The trooper will be instructed first to march past the target to his right, and without disturbing the motions of his horse, to fire to the right front, choosing his point anywhere from the small post to the barrier.

Next he will pass with the target on his left, firing to left front, at any point in his course between the small post and the harrier.

Next he will pass, with his right to the target, and fire between the barriers and the small post, to his right rear.

Finally, with his left to the target, he will fire to his left rear. within the prescribed limits of his course.

This practice at a gallop is the final and principal exercise of the target fixing.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

RECORD AND REPORTS OF TARGET FIRING.

 

194.—Beside the foregoing progressive instruction for recruits, there will be target fixing in every three months in every squadron; on each occasion, the best practiced troopers firing at least 12 shots mounted; every member of the squadron, not a capital prisoner, will join in the exercise.

There will be a record of target firing in each squadron kept in a book, giving the name and performance of each member. In the string measure, each miss at dismounted practice counts 24 inches, at mounted practice, 36 inches.

The book will be in printed blanks of the following form, and ruled for the number of members of the squad­rons, (companies,) viz:


 

 

Record of target practice of _____ squadron,­­­ _____ regiment, United States _____, for the quarter

ending  ______, 18___.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Names.

 

 

 

 

 

Rank.

 

DISM0UNTED.

 

 

MOUNTED.

 

50 yards.

 

 

100 yards.

 

At the halt—5O yds.

 

Gallop practice.

 

No. of
shots.

 

 

String
measure.

 

No. of
shots.

 

No. of
hits.

 

No. of
shots.

 

String
measure.

 

No. of
shots,

 

No. of
hits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Totals. . . . .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 












 

The squadron practiced, dismounted, on the _____ days of _____, 18___; and

mounted, on the ____ days of _____, 18____.

The above is a true record of the practice.

          _________________Captain.


                            

 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

195.          On the 1st of May and 1st of November, annually, the captains will report to the regimental commander an abstract giving the totals, from this record. At the same time he will make report of the names of the first and second best performers of the squadron, at the gallop prac­tice at the round target.

On receipt of these reports the commander of the regi­ment shall publish, in regimental orders, the first and second best squadrons, and the names of the two best shots in each squadron of the regiment.

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

 

SCHOOL OF THE PLATOON,

MOUNTED.

 

19f ——The troopers being sufficiently instructed to manage their horses and use their arms, are passed to the school of the platoon, the object of which is to teach them to exercise properly together, and execute all the movements of the platoon in the squadron, whether in column or in line.

Each movement, after having been correctly executed by the right, is repeated by the left

When the movements are all executed at the walk, the instructor causes them to be repeated at the trot, requiring always the same simultaneous action and the same precision. This gradation is also followed for the exercise at the gallop; but the horses are not kept a long time at this gait.

The platoon is composed of from 12 to 24 men, including 2 corporals; the instructor moves wherever his presence is most required; the platoon is under arms.

197.—The platoon formed in line, the troopers at the head of their horses, the instructor commands:

 

 

1. ATTENTION.

2. Right—DRESS.

3. FRONT.

 

He then commands:

 

COUNT FOURS.

 

At this command, the men, in a firm voice, commencing on the right, count, one, two, three, four, from right to left.

The troopers then mount by the times, and without explanation.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

ARTICLE FIRST.

 

 

GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF ALIGNMENT.

 

198.—The troopers, to align themselves, should regulate their shoulders upon those of the man on the side of tha alignment, and for this purpose they should turn the head, remaining square upon their horses, and so correct their positions as just to perceive the breast of the second trooper from them, and keep the horses straight in the ranks, that all may have a parallel direction.

 

 

SUCCESSIVE ALIGNMENT OF FILES IN THE

 

PLATOON.

 

199.—The two ales of the right or of the left are moved forward 10 paces, and aligned parallel to the platoon by the commands:1. Two files from right (or left) forward; 2. MARCH; 3. HALT; 4. right (or left) DRESS; FRONT.

 

The instructor commands

 

1. By file—right (or left) DRESS.

2. FRONT.

 

At the command, DRESS, the files move forward succes­sively and steadily, the troopers turning the head to the right, and taking the last steps slowly, In order to arrive abreast of the files already formed without passing beyond the alignment, observing then to halt, give the hand, relax the legs, and keep the head to the right until the command FRONT.

Each file executes the same movement when the pre­ceding one has arrived on the base of alignment, so that only one file may align Itself at the same time.

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

At the command, FRONT, turn the head to the front

200.—When the troopers execute correctly these alignments, this instruction is repeated in giving the two files of the right an oblique direction. For this purpose, the two files having marched forward 4 paces, as has been pre­scribed, execute a half turn to the right, or to the left, and march 6paces in this new direction.

The platoon being unmasked, the remainder of the movement is executed by the commands and following the principles prescribed, No. 199, each file, as it arrives nearly opposite the place it is to occupy, executes a half turn to the right, or to the left, so that having left the platoon by one straight line, it arrives upon the new alignment by another.

201. —The two files of the right, or of the left, are made to rein back 4 paces, and align themselves parallel to the platoon and opposite the place they occupied in it, by the commands 1. Two files from right (or left) backwards; 2. MARCH; 3. HALT; 4. Right (or left) DRESS; 5. FRONT.

 

The instructor commands:

 

1.          By file—right (or left) backward—DRESS.

2. FRONT.

 

At the command, DRESS, each file reins back successively, keeping perfectly straight, the troopers turning the head to the right, and passing a little to the rear of the files already formed, in order to come up abreast of them by a movement to the front, which renders the alignment more easy.

At the command. FRONT, turn the head to the front

The alignment of the rear gives the means of repairing a fault by returning to the alignment when it has been passed over; but it should be avoided as much as possible.

202.—The alignment is then executed by twos (or by fours.) For this purpose, the two or four files of the right move forward as has been prescribed, and the instructor commands:

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

1. By twos (or by fours)—right (or left)—DRESS.

2. FRONT.

 

At the command, DRESS, the files align themselves suc­cessively by twos (or by fours) following the principles prescribed for the alignment by file, being particular to set out and arrive upon the alignment together

At the command, FRONT, turn the head to the front.

203.—The instructor observes that the troopers align themselves on the breast of the second man towards the side of the alignment, and not upon the extremity of the rank, (which would prevent their remaining square in their seats;) that they are neither too much opened nor closed. The troopers are also required to align themselves promptly, that the horses may not be kept a long time gathered.

204.—When a platoon is not aligned, it arises from the fact, generally, that the horses are not straight in the ranks.

When a platoon dresses to the right, if the left wing is in rear, It is presumed that most of the horses are turned to the left; it is necessary to observe if this is the case, and to command the troopers to carry the hand slightly to the right, at the same time closing the right leg, which brings the horse upon the alignment.

When a platoon dresses to the right, if the left wing is in advance, it is presumed that the horses are turned to the right; the troopers are then required to carry the band to the left, closing at the same time the left leg, which causes the horse to step back to his proper place.

In dressing to the left the same faults are corrected by Inverse means.

205.—During the alignment, the instructor places him­self in front of the troopers, to be assured that they execute the movement steadily, and do not turn the head more than is prescribed; that they preserve their intervals of 4 inches between the knees; that they take the last steps slowly; that they align themselves without losing time as

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

they arrive; and that they give the hand and replace the legs immediately after being aligned.

206 —The instructor insists upon all these principles; but the alignments will be occasionally interrupted by marches in column, in order to calm the horses.

 

 

ALIGNMENT OF THE PLATOON.

 

207.—The platoon being in line, the instructor places the corporal of the flank on which he wishes to align it an such a position that no trooper will be forced to rein beck, and commands:

 

1. Right (or left) —DRESS.

2. FRONT.

At the command, DRESS, all the troopers align themselves promptly, but with steadiness.

At the command, FRONT, turn the head to the front.

208.—In all the alignments, the non-commissioned offi­cers on the flanks of platoons align on each other, without respect to the individual alignment of the troopers.

 

TO BREAK THE PLATOON BY FILE, BY

 TWOS, AND BY FOURS.

 

209.—The platoon being in line the instructor commands:

 

1. By file, by twos, (or by fours.)

2. MARCH.

 

At the first command, the first file, or files, gather their horses

At the command MARCH, the right file, or set of twos or fours, moves straight to the front; the next moves forward, when the croups of the horses of the first are even with the heads of their horses, or—which is the same—when the first file or set has marched 3 paces; they march 3 paces


SCHOOL OF THE

 

straight to the front, then make an individual oblique turn to the right, (30 degrees,) march in that direction until they are in column: then they make an oblique turn to the left to follow the first; the other files or sets do the same, In succession.

A second set of fours, commencing the oblique movement one length behind the first, marches 24 feet, and gains 20.78 feet to the front, to enter the column; losing the fraction in the two turns, there will be 4 open feet between them; the same difference in the distances to be marched exists with other sets. This is the distance to be preserved, in each of the three columns.

If the platoon be marching, at the command MARCH, the right four, or two, move on; and all the others halt, and then proceed as described.

 

 

DIRECT MARCH IN COLUMN BY FILE, TWOS,

AND BY FOURS.

 

210.—The troopers should keep their horses straight, and their eyes to the front; marching exactly behind each other in the column, preserving the distance of 4 feet from croup to head. The greater the depth of the column the more attention is necessary to the equality of the gait, and the preservation of distances.

The trouper on the left of the first set, right in front, or on its right, left in front, is guide of the column; he moves straight forward, and—when the platoon is led— preserves a gait which keeps the set one pace behind the chief of the platoon. The troopers behind him are the guides of their sets; the:’ preserve the distance; and the others align themselves on him, preserving from that side their intervals.

 

CHANGE OF DIRECTION.

211.—The column marching by file, twos, or fours, the instructor commands:

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

Left—TURN; or, Right—TURN.

 

At the first part of the command, the leading trooper, or set, gathers the horses.

At the command, TURN, the leading set turns, the pivot taking care not to slacken his gait, and to march over a quarter circle of five paces extent, thus gaining both to the front, and to the new direction, a distance of 10 feet. The trooper on the opposite side trots—increasing his gait so that the set shall be squarely aligned during the turn; the dressing is to this side; intervals are preserved from the pivot. Having made a full turn, the troopers who have Increased their gait resume the same gait they had been marching, and which is preserved by the pivots.

Each fraction marches steadily to the point where the first commenced the turn; and it should be explained to them that the distance on the outer flank must properly be much increased during the turn. The pivots are apt to lessen their speed, which, with the error of attempting to preserve distance unchanged, causes those in rear gradually to oblique.

 

 

TO HALT, AND TO COMMENCE THE MARCH

IN COLUMN.

 

212.—The column marching, the instructor commands:

 

Column—HALT.

 

To move off, the instructor commands:

 

Forward—MARCH.

 

INDIVIDUAL OBLIQUE MARCH.

 

213.—The column marching by file, by twos, or by fours, the instructor commands:

1. Left (or right) oblique.

2. MARCH.

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

At the command, MARCH, each trooper executes individu­ally a third of a turn, or face, to the left, without checking his motion.

The trooper on the left of the first set, who is guide of the column, moves straight forward in the new direction the trooper on the left of each of the other sets, who is its guide, moves forward also in the new direction, keeping in a perpendicular line to the proper front, passing through the guide of the column, and moving in a parallel direction with him.

The other troopers having turned, and marching in a parallel direction with their guide, align by him and keep their persons in a line parallel with that of their front be­fore commencing to oblique; thus the horse’s head of each will be opposite the shoulder of the next horse towards the guide, who, during the movement, is always on the flank towards which the oblique march is made.

To return to the primitive direction the instructor com­mands:

 

FORWARD.

 

At this command the troopers return to the original di­rection by an oblique turn while advancing, and move forward.

 

THE PLATOON MARCHING IN COLUMN BYFILE, BY TWOS, AND BY FOURS, TO FORM
LINE FACED TO THE FRONT, TO THELEFT, AND TO THE RIGHT.

 

214. —The platoon marching in column, right In fronts to form line faced to the front, the instructor commands

1. Front into line.

2. MARCH.

3. HALT.

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

4. DRESS.

5. FRONT.

 

At the command MARCH, the leading file or set continues to march forward, the others oblique to the left, march in that direction, and when opposite their places in line make an oblique turn to the right.

When the first files have marched twenty paces, the instructor commands: 1. HALT.  2. DRESS.  The other files come up successively on their left, halt and dress to the right until the command FRONT.

215.—A column marching left in front, the movement is executed on the same principles, but by inverse means, at the same commands.

216.—The column marching left in front, to form line faced to the left, upon the prolongation and in advance of its left flank, the instructor commands:

 

1. Front into line.

2. MARCH.

3. HALT

4. DRESS.

5. FRONT.

 

At the command MARCH, the first file or set turns to the left and moves straight forward, the others march straight on, and each turns successively, one, two or four paces beyond the point where the preceding one has turned.

When the first files have marched twenty paces, the instructor commands: 1. HALT.  2. DRESS.  The other files successively halt and dress to the left until the command FRONT.

217.—The column marching right in front, to form line faced to the right, upon the prolongation and in advance of its right flank, the movement is executed on the same principles, but by inverse means, at the commands 1. On right into line.  2. MARCH.  3. HALT.  4. DRESS.  5. FRONT.

218.—A column marching by file, or by twos, right in front, to form line faced to the left, the instructor commands:

 

 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

1. Left into line.

2. MARCH.

3. HALT

4. DRESS.

5. FRONT.

 

At the command, MARCH, the first file or set of twos turns to the left and moves straight forward, the others continue to march on, and turn successively to the left three paces before arriving opposite the places they are to occupy in the line, which is each on the left of the preceding one.

When the first files have marched twenty paces, the in­structor commands: 1. HALT. 2. DRESS. The other files come up, halt in succession, and dress until the command FRONT.

219.—The column, by file or by twos, marching left in front, to form line faced to the right, the movement is ex­ecuted on the same principles. but by inverse means, at the commands: 1. Right into line. 2. MARCH. 3. HALT.  4. DRESS. 5. FRONT.

220.—A column of fours right in front, marching or halted, to form line, faced to the left, on its left dank, the instructor commands:

 

1. Left into line wheel.

2. MARCH

3. Right—DRESS.

4. FRONT.

 

At the command, MARCH, each set of fours executes its wheel to the left, according to the principles of the wheel, on a fixed pivot, No. 283; Nos. 4, &.c., turn upon the fore-feet of their horses ; the other troopers, preserving their intervals from the pivot flank, regulate their alignment by the marching flank. At the command right—DRESS, the troopers halt, straighten their horses, and align themselves until the command FRONT.

221.—A column of fours left in front is formed in line. faced to the right, on its right flank, on the same prin-

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

ciples, by inverse means, at the commands: 1. Right into line wheel; 2. MARCH; 3. Left—DRESS; 4. FRONT.

222.—Line may also be formed to either side, without regard to right or left being in front. When the move­ments are executed with regularity at the walk, they are repeated at the trot and at the gallop.

 

MANUAL OF ARMS.

 

223. —The troopers being in line, execute at a halt the manual of arms, as prescribed, No. 165, and following.

224.—The exercise being finished, the troopers are com­manded to dismount and file off. The instructor remains mounted until the last horse in the platoon has filed off.

 

 

ARTICLE SECOND.

 

FORM TWOS AND FOURS AT THE SAME GAIT.

 

225.—The platoon marching in column by file, right in front to form twos, the instructor commands:

1. Form twos.

2. MARCH.

At the command, MARCH, the first trooper continues to march on, and halts when he has marched 12 paces; the second obliques to the left, and comes up abreast of the first; on arriving there, he halts and dresses to the right. AII the others continue to march straight forward, Nos. 2 and 4 executing their movement in the same manner, but successively, and when Nos. 1 and 3. upon which they should form, have nearly arrived at their proper distance, and arc about to halt

226. —The platoon marching in column by twos, right in front, to form fours, the instructor commands:

1. Form fours.

2. MARCH.

 

 

      SCHOOL OF THE

 

At the command, MARCH, the first two troopers continue to march on, and halt when they have marched 12 paces; the two following oblique to the left, and come up abreast of the first two; on arriving there, they halt and dress to the right. All the others continue to march straight for­ward, Nos 3 and 4 executing their movement in the same manner, but successively, and when Nos. 1 and 2, upon which they should form, have nearly arrived at their proper distance, and are about to halt.

227—When the column is at a trot the formation of twos and fours at the same gait is executed, following the same principles. The first two troopers pass to the walk, at the command, MARCH; the others continue to march at the trot, until they have arrived abreast of those on which they should form; then they pass to the walk.

When the column is at a gallop the movement is exe­cuted, following the same principles. The first, or first two troopers, pass to the trot at the command, MARCH; the others continue to march at the gallop, until they have executed their formation; then they passj to the trot.

When twos or fours are formed at the trot or at the gallop, the guide is announced as soon as the first files have doubled. In executing the same movements at a walk, as the head of the column halts, the guide is not announced.

The column marching left in front, these movements are executed, following the same principles and by inverse means, at the same command.

 

TO BREAK BY TWOS AND BY FILE AT THE

SAME GAIT.

 

228.—The platoon marching in column by fours, right in front, to break by twos, the instructor commands:

1.       By twos.

2.                 MARCH.

At the command, by twos, all the troopers prepare to halt, except the first number, 1 and 2.


 

 

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED.       

 

At the command, MARCH, these continue to march at the same gait; all the others halt. Nos. 3 and 4 of the lead­ing rank oblique to the right the moment they are passed by the croup of the horses of Nos. 1 and 2, and place themselves in column behind them.

Each set of fours executes successively the same move­ment, Nos 1 and 2 breaking as soon as files 3 and 4 of the rank which precedes them have commenced obliquing, in order to enter the column.

229.—The platoon marching in column by twos, right in front, to break by file, the instructor commands:

 

I.       By file.

2.       MARCH.

 

This is executed on the same principles as the preceding.

230.—When the column is at the trot, to break by twos or by file is executed on the same principles; the right files of the leading rank continue at the trot; all the others take the walk at the command, MARCH, and resume the trot, in order to enter the column; when the column is at the gallop. the files which are to break take the trot at the command, MARCH, and afterwards resume the gallop on entering the column.

The instructor observes that the files which break, halt, change gait, and put themselves again in motion, with steadiness; that they keep their horses straight, so as not to retard the movements of those which only march for­ward, and that they retake successively their distances, their directions, and their original gait.

231.—The column marching left in front, the movement is executed, following the same principles but by inverse means, at the commands: 1. By the left, by twos, (or by file;)

2.   MARCH.


SCHOOL OF THE

 

TO FORM TWOS AND FOURS IN DOUBLING

THE GAIT.

 

232.—The platoon marching In column by file, right in front, to form twos, the instructor commands:

 

1.       Form twos—trot.

2.       MARcH.

 

At the first command, all the even numbers prepare to take the trot.

At the command, MARCH, numbers two and four through­out take the trot, oblique to the left, and come up abreast of Nos. 1 and 3; then all trot except the first twos, who continue the walk; the others trot, until they arrive at their proper distance, when they pass to the walk.

233.—The platoon marching in column by twos, right in front, to form fours the instructor commands:

 

1.        Form fours—trot.

2.        MARCH.

 

At the 1st command, all the numbers three and four pre­pare to take the trot.

At the command, MARCH, numbers 3 and 4 throughout take the trot, oblique to the left, and come up abreast of Nos. I and 2; the 1st set of fours continue the walk; all the others trot, until they arrive at their proper distance, when they pass to the walk.

234.—When the column is at the trot, the movement is executed on the same principles. At the command, MARCH, numbers 3 and 4 throughout take the gallop, &c.; and all resume the trot when their formation is executed.

When the column is at the gallop, the movement to form twos or fours is always executed at the same gait, as pre­scribed, No 227.

235.—The column marching left in front, the movement Is executed, following the same principles but by inverse means, at the same commands.


PLATOON, MOUNTED.



236.—The platoon marching in column by fours, the in­structor commands:

 

1.       By twos—trot.

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, Nos. 1 and 2, of the leading set of fours, commence the trot; all the others continue to march at the, walk; Nos. 3 and 4, the moment the croups of the horses of No.. 1 and 2 pass their horses’ heads, oblique to the right at the trot, to place themselves in column be­hind them; then the next No.. 1 and 2 take the trot, then the next Nos. 3 and 4 trot and oblique as soon as they are passed, and so on.

237.—The platoon marching in column by twos, to break by file, the instructor commands:

 

1.       By file—trot.

2.       MARCH.

 

This is executed on the same principles, No. 236.

 

To Break by Twos and By File, In Doubling the Gait.

 

238.—When the column is at the trot, to break in doubling the gait, the instructor commands: 1. By twos, (or by file)— gallop; 2. MARCH; which is executed on the same principles.

When the column is at the gallop, the movement to break by twos or by file is executed at the same gait as prescribed, No. 230.

In these movements, the instructor observes that the head of the column changes gait with moderation, and that the troopers who follow do not permit their horses to move off before the moment prescribed.

239—-The column marching left in front, the movement is executed on the same principles, by inverse means, at the commands: 1. By the left—by twos (or by file) 3. MARCH.


 


SCHOOL OF THE


        SABRE EXERCISE.

 

240. The instructor causes the sabre exercise to be executed at a halt; for this purpose he orders the odd numbers to march forward 6 paces; he then commands:

 

I.       By the left (or by the right)—open files.

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, the right trooper of each rank moves forward 6 paces; the second and third oblique to the left, and come up abreast of the right files, with intervals of 4 paces; the others first turn to the left, march forward, and turn to the right so as to come into each line with the same intervals.

241. When the instructor wishes to form the platoon, he commands:

1.       Second rank into line.

2.       MARCH.

 

At the second command, the troopers ride into the mid­dle of their intervals; the instructor then commands:

 

1.       Close files to the right (or left.)

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, the right file moves forward 6 paces; the second and third oblique to their places; the others turn to the right, march forward, and turn to the left, into their places.

 

ARTICLE THIRD.

 

DIRECT MARCH OF THE PLATOON IN LINE.

 

243.—The most important point in the direct march .being to keep the horses straight in the ranks, it is indispensable that the troopers should preserve the head direct.

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED,

 

The troopers should yield to all pressure coming from the side of the guide, and resist that coming from the op­posite side.

The guide should always march at a free and steady gait, and change it with steadiness, in order to avoid irregularity in the ranks.

If the troopers are too near to or too far from the man on the side of the guide, they move from or approach him very gradually, and in gaining ground to the front, but not immediately; the irregularity generally results from errors which will correct themselves, and which precipitancy will only aggravate.

When the guide feels himself thrown out of his direction, he extends his arm to the front to indicate that there is too much pressure towards him. Then the troopers carry the bridle hand towards the opposite side, give a glance to the guide, and straighten their horses as soon as the guide is relieved; but the troopers must be taught to correct the intervals of files more by the leg than by the hand.

244.—The corporal of the flank opposite to the guide is not required to preserve the head direct. He aligns himself upon the guide and the general front of the platoon.

The guide is commanded alternately to the right and to the left, that the troopers may have the habit of dressing equally towards either direction.

When the instructor wishes to exercise the platoon at the direct march, it is conducted to the extremity of a grouud of sufficient extent to admit of its marching some time without changing the direction.

245.— The platoon being in line, the instructor com­mands:

 

1.       Open files to the left (or to the right.)

2.       MARCH.

3.       Right (or Left)—DRESS.

4.      FRONT.

 

At the command, MARCH. all the troopers, except the right file, passage to the left, as prescribed, No. 134; the

 

 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

second trooper straightens his horse and halts as soon as he has gained an interval of I pace between himself and the trooper of the right.

Each of the other troopers executes the same movement, regulating the interval by the trooper on his right.

The troopers being aligned, the instructor indicates to the guide of the right, or of the left, a fixed point In a direction perpendicular to the front of the platoon he in­structs him to take an intermediate point, never to lose sight of these two points, in order to keep himself always In the proper direction, and to select a more distant point as he approaches the one nearest to him.

To give a point of direction, the instructor places himself exactly behind the right file, or the left file, and indicates to the trooper of the front rank an object on the ground which is immovable and can be distinctly seen, such as a tree, or a rock.

246.—To march the platoon forward the instructor commands:

1.       Forward.

2.       Guide right, (or left)

3.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, all the troopers move straight forward at the same gait with the men on the side of the guide.

The troopers should give a glance from time to time towards the guide.

During the march the Instructor is sometimes at the side of the guide, to assure himself that the troopers march on the same line; and sometimes behind the guide, to observe that he follows the direction indicated.

247.—To halt the platoon, the instructor commands:

1.       Platoon.

2.       HALT.

3.       Right (or left)—DRESS.

4.      FRONT.

At the command, HALT, the troopers stop.


PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 


At the command, FRONT, turn the head to the front.

248.—The troopers having been sufficiently exercised in marching with open files, the instructor halts the platoon, and commands:

 

1.       Close files to the right, (or to the left.)

2.       MARCH.

3.       Right (or Left)—DRESS.

4.      FRONT.

 

At the command, MARCH, all the troopers except the right file, passage to the right and resume their places

249.—When the troopers begin to manage their horses properly at the walk, they are required to open and close files, marching at the same gait, taking care not to repeat these movements too often, but to make them march some time after having opened the files, before closing them, and after having closed the files, before opening them; for this purpose the instructor commands:

 

1.       Open files to the kit (or to the right.)

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, all the troopers except the right file make an oblique turn to the left, at the same time advanc­ing and preserving their alignment. When they are at one pace from the man on the right, they straighten their horses and move forward.

250.—To close files, the instructor commands:

 

I.       Close files to the right (or to the left.)

2.       MARCH.

 

This movement is executed following the same princi­ples, but by inverse means. Each trooper should close the leg in sufficient time to preserve his interval from the file to which he closes.

251. These movements having been executed to the

 


SCHOOL OF THE


 

right and to the left in marching at the walk, they are re­peated at the trot.

The platoon is then exercised in commencing the trot from a halt, and in halting while marching at this gait.

252.—After the troopers have been exercised sufficiently in the direct march to confirm them in the principles, the instructor makes use of the following means, which consist in causing faults to be committed that the troopers may learn how to correct them.

The platoon being on the march, the instructor directs the guide to augment or slacken his gait by degrees, and from time to time without command. He gives notice to the troopers that they must employ the means prescribed to replace themselves upon the alignment.

The instructor next instructs the guide to take a direc­tion which carries him a little out, repeating to the troopers that they should gain ground to the side only in advancing.

When the troopers learn to reclose with steadiness, the Instructor directs the guide to take a direction that will cause crowding in the ranks; then the troopers yield to the pressure, and gain insensibly ground towards the opposite direction.

The instructor reminds them that to repair irregularities too rapidly would create new ones.

When the troopers have acquired, in the execution of these movements at the walk, the necessary skill to avoid confusion, they are repeated at the trot.

253.—As one of the most necessary instructions for pre­paring the soldier to act In squadron, Is the method of marching perfectly straight, by keeping in line two objects, for this purpose each man will be successively placed on the directing flank.

254.—To exercise the troopers in the direct march at the gallop, the progression established for the exercise at the walk and at the trot is followed, except that the ranks are neither opened nor closed, nor arc faults committed to be again repaired.

When marching at a gallop, the platoon should habitu­

 

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

ally pass to the trot and the walk before being halted; but when the troopers are masters of their horses, it may be halted sometimes without changing the gait.

 

COUNTERMARCH.

 

255 —The platoon having arrived at the extremity of the ground, in order to change its direction to face to the rear, the instructor commands:

 

1.       Countermarch by the right flank.

2.       MARCH.

3.       FRONT.

 

At the command, MARCH, the non-commissioned officer on the right turns to the right about, No. 93, moves to the rear, and turns to the right, and moves forward, so as to pass one pace in rear of’ the croups of the horses of the pla­toon; arriving near the flank he turns to the left, and halts behind the left file, with two paces between the croups of their horses. The other troopers move, each when the one on his right has gone five paces, (nearly com­pleted his about turn,) performs his right about and right turn from his own ground independently, and will thus find himself one pace behind the trooper who had been on his right; and each turns to the left so as to come into his place in line as before, halts, and dresses to the right. But the troopers who are at the left of the centre of the platoon, make at first a right turn, moving so as to follow each other with distances of one pace, and turn again to the right opposite their places, and move up into line, dressing by the right.

At the command, FRONT, all turn their eyes to the front.

256.—The countermarch is executed by the left flank on the same principles

The countermarch should generally be executed at the trot; the instructor adding that word to the first command.


 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

WHEELINGS.

 

257.—There are two kinds of wheels: the wheel on fixed pivot, and the wheel on a movable pivot.

The wheel is always on a fixed pivot, except when the command is right (or Left)—TURN.

The troopers should execute this movement without dis­uniting, and without ceasing to observe the alignment.

In every kind of wheel, the conductor of the marching flank should measure with his eye the arc of the circle he is to pass over, so that it may not be necessary for the files either to open or close he turns his head occasionally towards the pivot; if he perceives that the troopers are too much crowded, or too open, he increases or diminishes gradually the extent of his circle in gaining more or less ground to the front than to the side.

Each trooper should describe his circle in the ratio of the distance at which lie may be from the pivot. As these different arcs are all passed over in the same time, it is necessary that each trooper should slacken his pace in pro­portion to the distance from the marching flank.

During the wheel, the troopers should turn the head slightly towards the marching flank, to regulate the rapidity of their march, and to keep themselves aligned; they must also preserve the intervals of files on the side of the pivot, in order to remain closed to that side. They should nevertheless yield to pressure coming from the pivot, and resist that from the opposite direction. The horses are slightly turned towards the pivot, in order to keep them upon the circular line they have to pass over.

When the troopers have opened, they should approach the pivot insensibly, diminishing their circle by degrees, in gaining more ground to the front than to the side. In this case, they give alternately a glance to the pivot and to the marching flank, taking care not to force the pivot.

When the troopers have closed too much, they should


 


 

PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

endeavor to correct the fault gradually In Increasing their circle by degrees, and gaining more ground to the front than to the side. For this purpose, they give alternately a glance to the marching flank and to the pivot.

In every kind of wheel, the troopers should cease wheel­ing and retake the direct march at the command FORWARD at whatever point of the wheel they may be. It is neces­sary to observe, also, that the flanks which become pivots, or marching flanks, do not slacken or augment the pace before the command of execution, a very common fault, arising chiefly from want of care in giving the commands with exactness as to time.

 

 

TO WHEEL ON A FIXED PIVOT.

 

258.—The use of a wheel on a fixed pivot is, when the platoon forms a part of the squadron, to pass from the order of battle to the order of column, and from the order of column to the order of battle.

The trooper who forms the pivot of the wheel turns his horse upon his forefeet, keeps his ground, and comes gradually round with the rank.

When the platoon is marching, the pivot halts, and the marching flank executes its movement at the same gait as before the wheel.

If the instructor indicates a new gait, In order to wheel, the marching flank wheels at this gait; all the other troopers regulate the rapidity of their march in accordance with their distance from the marching flank, and take freely the new gait at the command FORWARD.

When the platoon is halted after a wheel on a fixed pivot, the alignment is always ordered towards the side of the marching flank.

 

259. – The platoon being formed in line, the instructor commands:

 


SCHOOL OF THE TROOPER


 

1.       In circle right (or left) wheel

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, the troopers put themselves in motion; the non-commissioned officer who conducts the moving flank marches at a walk, measuring with the eye the extent of the circle he is to pass over, that neither opening nor closing may be caused in the rank, and that the troopers may keep aligned. The pivot man turns upon his own ground, regulating himself upon the marching flank.

 

260 —When the platoon has executed several wheels, to halt it, the instructor commands:

 

1.       Platoon.

2.       HALT.

3.      Left (or right) DRESS.

4.      FRONT.

 

At the command, HALT, the troopers straighten their horses and halt with steadiness.

At the command, Left (or right)—DRESS, they align them­selves towards the side indicated.

At the command, FRONT, turn the head to the front.

 

26l.—The platoon Is then marched forward, and made to recommence the wheel. When the instructor wishes the platoon to take the direct march, he commands:

 

1.      FORWARD

2.       Guide left (or right.)

 

At the command, FORWARD, the pivot resumes the gait at which it was previously marching.

All the other troopers straighten their horses, and the two flanks move forward at the same gait, conforming to the principles of the direct march.

At the command guide left (or right,) the troopers regulate their movement towards the side indicated.




PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

262.—When the troopers have executed several wheels to the right and to the left, interrupted occasionally by direct marches, and when the horses become calm, the in­structor causes them to pass to the trot; after several wheels at the trot, they resume the walk.

263.—If the platoon is wheeling to the right, and the Instructor wishes it to change the wheel to the left without halting, he commands:

 

1.       In circle left wheel.

2.       MARCH.

At the command, MARCH, the left flank halts, and becomes the pivot. The right flank assuming the gait at which the left flank was marching, describes a circle pro­portionate to the extent of the front. All the other troop­ers first straightening their horses, guide them so as to pass over the new circles.

264.—The platoon being halted, to place it in a direc­tion perpendicular to the original front, the instructor commands:

 

I.       Right (or Left) wheel.

2.       MARCH.

3.       HALT.

4.      Left (or right)—DRESS.

5.       FRONT.

Which is executed on the same principles of the wheel on a fixed pivot.

The instructor gives the command, HALT, when the marching flank has nearly terminated its wheel.

265.—The platoon being halted, to wheel it about, or to place In an oblique direction to the right or left, the in­structor gives the command:

1.   Right about (or left about) wheel; or, right half (or left half)whul; 2. MARCH; 3. HALT; 4. Left (or right) DRESS; 5.FRONT.

Which is executed on the principles of the wheel on a fixed pivot, No. 258.


 

 


 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

Before dressing the platoon, the trooper on the marching flank is made to come up, if necessary, abreast of the pivot man, so that the other troopers will not have to rein back in order to align themselves.

266.—The platoon being on the march, the same move­ments are executed at the commands: I. Right (or left) wheel, right about (or left about) wheel, right half (or left half) wheel; 2. MARCH 3. FORWARD

At the command, MARCH, the wheeling flank wheels at the gait at which the platoon was marching the pivot flank halts.

At the command, FORWARD, the pivot resumes its original pace, and the two flanks move forward at the same gait, with the guide as before.

These movements being properly executed from a halt and at the walk, are repeated at tile tret

 

TO WHEEL ON A MOVABLE PIVOT.

 

267. -—The wheel on a movable pivot is employed in the successive changes of direction in column.

In this wheel, the object of the movable pivot is to leave by degrees the ground on which the movement com­mences it allows each platoon to wheel on the same ground, without altering distances, or retarding the column.

The conductor (of the marching flank should increase his gait and describe his arc of circle so as to cause the files neither to open nor close. The pivot describes an arc of a circle, the radius being about 10 feet; and consequently, in a right, or left turn, the trooper on the flank gains about 10 feet to the front, and as much to a flank, his quarter circle being 5 paces. The troopers from the centre to the marching flank increase the gait progressively; the centre man preserves the gait at which the platoon was marching. The troopers from the centre to the pivot slacken the gait progressively; the pivot trooper slackens his gait, so as to pass over his 5 paces in the same time that the centre man takes to pass round his arc without changing his gait. At


 

PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

the end of the wheel on a movable pivot, the portion of the rank which had augmented its gait should slacken it, and that which had slackened its gait should augment it. All the troopers straighten their horses the marching flank and the pivot resume the gait at which they originally marched.

268.—The platoon being on the march, to cause it to change direction, the instructor commands:

 

1.       Left (or righl)—TURN.

2.       FORWARD.

At the first command, the platoon turns to the left or to the right, the pivot slackening its gait, in describing on arc of five paces; the marching flank augments its gait, and regu­lates itself by the pivot during the whole of the wheel.

At the command, FORWARD, all the troopers straighten their horses, the pivot and marching flank moving forward In the gait at which the platoon was originally marching

The troopers not having been exercised to wheel at the gallop on a fixed pivot, they are made to wheel on a mova­ble pivot only in marching at the walk, that the marching flank, which should increase its gait, will have to take only the trot.

269 —To exercise the troopers in wheeling at the gallop on a fixed pivot, the progression established for the exercise at the walk and at the trot is followed : but the platoon is always halted before changing the direction of the wheel.

The instructor changes the gait frequently, and avoids galloping too long to the same hand

The platoon is exercised also to wheel at the trot and at the gallop, in setting out from a halt, and to halt while wheel­ing at these gaits.

 

 

INDIVIDUAL OBLIQUE MARCH.

 

270 —The platoon marching in line, to cause it to gain ground towards one of its flanks, without changing the front, the instructor commands:



 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

1.       Right (or left) oblique.

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, the troopers execute, all at the same time, a turn of 30 degrees to the right, so that the head of each horse may be opposite the shoulder of the horse on his right, and that the right knee of each trooper may be in rear of the left knee of the trooper on his right. This first movement being executed, the troopers move forward in the new direction, regulating themselves upon the guide.

When the platoon has obliqued sufficiently, the instruc­tor commands:

 

FORWARD.

 

At this command, the troopers straighten their horses and move forward, regulating themselves upon the guide.

In the oblique march, the guide is always on the obliquing side, without being indicated; and after the command, FORWARD, the guide returns, without indication, to the side on which it was originally.

When the troopers are not closed they should Increase progressively the gait, in order to approach the side towards which they march; they should insensibly slacken the gait if they are too much closed, or more advanced than the flank towards which they oblique.

27 1.—The platoon marching at the walk, to execute the oblique at the trot the instructor commands: 1. Right (or feft) oblique—trot; 2. MARCH.

When the platoon has obliqued sufficiently, the instructor commands: FORWARD.

The guide observes particularly to commence the trot without precipitation.

The same course Is observed If the platoon Is marching at the trot, and the object is to oblique at the gallop.



 

PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

THE PLATOON MARCHING IN LINE, TO BREAK IT BY FOURS OR BY TWOS AT THE SAME GAIT.

 

272.—The instructor commands:

 

I.       By fours (or by twos.)

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, the first four (or two) files to the right continue to march forward at the same gait; the other files halt and break successively by fours, (or by twos.) as prescribed, No. 209.

The platoon marching in line, to break it by file the movement is executed on the same principles, the first file only continuing to march forward.

273.—The platoon marching at the trot, it is broken on the same principles, the first files continuing to march at the same gait, all the other files assume the walk at the command MARCH, and resume the trot as they break from the platoon.

The same course is observed when the platoon marches at the gallop; the first files continue to march at that gait, the others assume the trot at. the command MARCH, and resume the gallop as they commence to oblique.

274.—To break the platoon by the left, the movement Is executed, following the same principles, but by inverse means, at the commands 1. By the left—by fours. (or by twos.) 2. MARCH.

 

 

THE PLATOON MARCHING IN COLUMN BY TWOS OR BY FOURS, TO FORM IT AT THE SAME GAIT.

 

275 —The platoon marching in column, right or left In front, the instructor commands:

 


SCHOOL OF THE



I.       Form platoon.

2.       MARCH.
          3.       HALT.

 

The movement is executed as prescribed for front into line, No. 214.

276—The platoon marching in column at the trot, right or left in front, the instructor commands:

1.       Form platoon.

2.       MARCH.

3.       Guide right (or left.)

At the command, MARCH, the first two (or four) files pass to the walk; the other files continue to march at the same gait, oblique immediately to the left, march straight in this direction, make an oblique turn to the right on coming opposite the place they are to occupy in the platoon, and pass to the walk on arriving upon the alignment of the first.

At the command, guide right, they correct their alignment towards the right.

277. —When the command is at the gallop, the platoon is formed on the same principles. The first two or four) files take the trot at the command MARCH; the other files con­tinue to march at the gallop, and take the trot on arriving upon the alignment of the first.

When the column is marching by file, the platoon is formed on the same principles.

 

THE PLATOON MARCHING IN LINE, TO BREAK IT BY FOURS OR BY TWOS, IN DOUBLING THE GAIT.

 

278. —The instructor commands

 

1.                 By fours  (or by twos)—trot.

2.                 MARCH

 

At the command, MARCH, the first four (or two) files of the right take the trot; the others continue to march at the

 

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED.



walk, and take successively the trot when they oblique to the right. in order to enter the column.

279—The platoon marching at the trot, the instructor

commands:

 

1.       By fours (or by twos)—gallop.

2.       MARCH.

 

Which is executed as prescribed, No. 278.

The platoon marching in line, to break it by file, the movement is executed on the same principles.

When the platoon marches at the gallop, it is always broken without doubling the gait.

280.—To break the platoon by the left, the movement is executed on the same principles, but by inverse means, at the commands: 1. By the left, by fours (or by twos)—trot (or gallop:) 2. MARCH.

 

 

THE PLATOON MARCHING IN COLUMN BY TWOS OR BY FOURS, TO FORM IT IN DOUBLING THE GAIT.

 

281.—The platoon marching in column, right or left in front, the instructor commands:

 

I.    Form platoon—trot.

2.   MARCH.

3.   Guide right (or left.)

 

At the command. MARCH, the first two (or four) files con­tinue to march forward at the same gait; the other files take the trot, oblique immediately to the left, march in this direction, make an oblique turn to the right on coming opposite to the place they are to occupy in the platoon, and pass to the walk, on arriving upon the alignment of the first.

282.—The platoon marching in column, at the trot, right or left in front, the instructor commands:



 

 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

1.       Form platoon—gallop.

2.      MARCH.

3.       Guide right (or left.)

 

Which is executed as prescribed, No. 281.

When the column is at the gallop, the platoon is always formed at the same gait.

When the column is marching by file, the platoon is formed on the same principles.

 

 

MOVEMENTS BY FOURS, THE PLATOON BEING IN COLUMN OR IN LINE.

 

283 —The platoon being in line, to form it in a column of fours, the instructor commands:

 

1.       Fours, right, (or left

2.       MARCH.

3.       HALT.

 

At the command, MARCH, each set of fours executes its wheel of a quarter of a circle, on the principles prescribed for the wheel on the fixed pivot; Nos 1 or Nos. 4 turn upon the fore feet of their horses gradually, keeping square with the other flank: the others preserve their intervals from the pivot, and also regulate their alignment by the marching flank. At the command, HALT, the troopers straighten their horses and halt. If the command, HALT, is omitted, they move off straight in the new direction at the gait of the marching flank.

284 —The platoon, marching in column of fours, to march it in line to a flank, the instructor commands:

 

1.       Fours—RIGHT, (or Fours—left.)

2.       Guide left (or right)

At the first command, the pivots halt, and the wheels are executed on the same principle, (No. 283,) and at the mo­ment of their completion all move forward in line.


 

 

PLATOON , MOUNTED.

 

285.—The platoon, marching in line, to cause it to march to either flank, the instructor commands:

Fours—RIGHT, (or Fours—LEFT.)

This command is executed on the same principles as in the preceding, No 284.

286.—The platoon being in line, or column of tours to face it to the rear, the instructor commands

1.       Fours left (or right) about.

2.       MARCH.

3.       HALT.

 

At the command, MARCH, each set of fours wheels to the left about, on the principles prescribed for the wheel to the right or left, No. 283.

At the command, HALT, the troopers straighten their horses, and halt in line or column, faced to the rear.

If the command HALT be omitted, they move straight off, in the new direction, at the gait of the wheeling flank of the fours. If they are in line, the instructor then adds, guide right.

287 —The platoon marching in line, or column of fours, to cause it to face and march in the opposite direction, the instructor commands:

 

1.       Fours—LEFT ABOUT, (or RIGHT ABOUT.)

And if in line:

2.       Guide right (or left.)

 

At the command, LEFT ABOUT, or RIGHT ABOUT, each set of fours, its pivots halting, executes the wheel of a half circle, on the principles prescribed No. 283, and having completed it, moves off in the new direction. The wheel being nearly completed, the instructor may command: 2. HALT.

288.—The wheels by fours must be executed with care and steadiness, regulating, in wheels from line, by the left when wheeling to the left, by the right when wheeling to the right; in the about wheels from column, the first half of the wheel by the fours in front, arid the last half by those that are becoming the front. Thus all the wheels, commenced gently, must be completed by the fours at the same moment.


 

SCHOOL OF THE


 

It is absolutely necessary that the pivots should not move, except to turn their horses on the fore feet. When previously in motion, it is the more important that the instructor should observe and insist upon this point.

289 —These movements being correctly executed at the walk, they are taught at the trot.  Not at the gallop.

 

 

ARTICLE FOURTH.

 

RUNNING AT THE HEADS, AND PISTOL

PRACTICE.

 

290 —To perfect the troopers in the use of their arms and in managing their horses, they are exercised at run­ning at heads and rings, connected with target firing.

For this purpose a quadrangular track will be laid out, 90 yards long and 30 wide, or larger, movable posts will be prepared—two 9 feet high will have a horizontal bar from the top about 3 feet long, from the end of which an iron ring about 3 inches in diameter is suspended—for the practice of the points: one post 6 feet high, with a vertical pin in the top, on which will revolve a block of wood about 18 inches long, balancing a light pole about 6 feet long inserted in one end, to represent a lance or sabre, and which will be easily turned by a parry, but will have the end blunted, one post 4 feet high, made otherwise the same, the pole to represent a bayonet; there will also be three posts 7 feet high and three 4 ½  feet high, to represent horsemen and infantry; these six to be surmounted by raw­hide or canvass heads (balls) stuffed with hay.

Heads will also be used, resting on the ground, for the practice of the points against infantry; (they, and more commonly Indians or other irregulars, often throwing them­selves flat to escape the blows, &c., of cavalry)

For blank cartridge firing smaller balls may be used, placed upon the posts.

 

 

 

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

At 3 paces diagonally outside an angle of the track, a round post, 12 inches in diameter 8 feet high, will stand for a pistol target

The posts will be placed about 3 feet from the track, on either side or end: the pole, representing a bayonet, will be placed perpendicular to the track, reaching about one foot from it; that representing a sabre, pointing towards the rider, but nearly parallel with the track; next to each will be placed a post with a head, for the delivery of a thrust or cut; these will be the closer as the troopers im­prove in skill, until they are as near as 6 feet

The track should turn the angles in a quarter circle of 15 feet ; the disposition of posts, at or very near the turn, will be suitable to advanced practice; the target post being placed as directed, the balls will range within one quarter of the surrounding grounds.

The platoon will be formed in two lines near the ends, facing the centre At first not more than two troopers ex­ercise at once;moving, at the same time, at the signal of the instructor, from the left of each line—if to ride to the right hand—and returning to their right flank. They will, in general, at the uninterrupted canter, first draw pistol and fire a blank cartridge at a head, return pistol, draw sabre. and commence its use as soon as possible—the de­creasing distance from the firing point marking the im­provement and skill of the trooper, as also his promptness in firing after using the sabre.

In every squadron, at n period of exercises, there will be exercises in this article for one hour and a half one day in every week.

The Captains will, on the 1st of June and 1st of Decem­ber, each year, report to the commander of the regiment, in writing, the names of the two best troopers at these ex­ercises. They will be announced in regimental orders

On application the Colonel may grant trials of skill be­tween squadrons, and also between members of different squadrons. He will preside and judge, or appoint judges who will make report to him.


 

 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

TO LEAP THE DITCH AND THE FENCE.

 

291.—The instructor causes the troopers to leap ditches and low fences, by twos and by fours, and then by platoon; observing the principles prescribed, No. 185 and following.

 

TO CHARGE BY PLATOON.

 

292.—The charge will be practiced by twos, fours, and half platoons, before the charge by platoon.

To charge by platoon the instructor orders the sabre. to be drawn; he commands:

1.       Forward.

2.       Guide right, (or left.)

3.       MARCH.

 

When the platoon has marched 20 paces, the Instructor commands:

1.       Trot.

2.       MARCH.

At 60 paces further, he commands:

1.       Gallop.

2.       MARCH.

At 80 paces further, he commands:

CHARGE.

 

At this command, the troopers take the position of charge—SABRE They give hand and lengthen the gallop without losing control of their horses or disuniting.

When the platoon has charged 60 paces, the Instructor commands:

1.      Attention.

2.       Platoon.

3.      HALT.

4.      Right (or left)—DRESS.

5.       FRONT.

 


PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

At the command attention, the troopers carry the sabre to the shoulder

At the command platoon, they take the trot.

At the command HALT, they stop

293. The troopers should be exercised at the charge with the greatest care, without being required to repeat it too often.

The instructor requires the gallop to be kept up; he sees that the troopers preserve ease in the ranks; that they hold alight hand so that the horses not being constrained in their movements may not become too restive; and, on the other hand, that the intervals between files is not increased: the guide must at first have an object pointed out, toward which to direct his whole course.

 

RALLYING.

 

294.—To exercise the troopers in rallying, the platoon is formed at the extremity of the ground, the sabres are drawn, and the signal charge as forager is sounded; at this signal, the troopers gallop forward in couples and charge as foragers; the instructor and the flank files remain in place, to mark out the rallying point. When the troopers have marched 150 or 200 paces, the instructor orders the rally to be sounded. At this signal, the troopers wheel to the left about, and, as rapidly as possible to be well in hand, pass to the rear out­side of the flanks, to turn again and resume their places in rank. As soon as two-thirds of the troopers have joined, the instructor commands the platoon to move forward.  At first the platoon is rallied at the trot, and then at the gallop. This movement is repeated without retaining the flank files; in this case the troopers rally behind the instructor.

 

8KIRMISHING.

 

295.—The objects of employing skirmishers are, to cover movements and evolutions, to gain time, to watch the movements of the enemy, to keep him in check, to prevent his approaching so close to the main body as to annoy the

 



SCHOOL OF THE

 

line of march and to weaken and harass him by their fire; to prepare the way for the charge on infantry, by rendering them unsteady, or drawing their fire.

In flank movements they cover the front and flank of the column nearest to the enemy. The trooper skirmishing is much thrown upon his own intelligence and resources as much coolness as watchfulness is required of him; and he should especially guard against exciting his horse.

On service, regularity in skirmishing and correctness of distance cannot always be maintained. On account of the movements of the enemy, and the nature of the ground but the general rules and practice will be easily conformed to. ant applied according to circumstances.

Skirmishers should be much practiced in conforming to changes of front or position, and movements in column, without requiring orders and commands for the purpose.  Above all, they must be instructed to look to the nature of the ground, and the supposed opposite movements of the enemy. Skirmishers must be very exact and alert in noticing and instantly obeying the signals made for their guidance, whether preceeding from their immediate commander— as by a wave of the arm and sabre—or from the trumpet. It should be impressed upon the troopers on all occasions to Ievel low, and never to fire without deliberate aim having first come steadily to a halt. The fire-arms will never be cocked until the time comes for firing; and on actual service, officers and non-commissioned officers, when the signal to commence firing is heard, must watch that only those men fire who see the enemy within suitable range.

296.—The platoon being supposed to form a part of the squadron, it is dispersed as skirmishers, in order to cover the front and flanks of the squadron

The platoon being in line at the extremity of the ground, arms loaded and sabres drawn, the instructor marches the platoon forward, and when he wishes to disperse the trooper, as skirmishers, he commands

I.       Eight files from right, as skirmishers.

2.       MARCH.


 

 

PLATOON. MOUNTED.

 

At the command, MARCH, the left guide commands the four or more files, of the left, to halt; they constitute the reserve. At the same command, the eight files of the right continue to march forward ; after going 10 paces, they disperse as skirmishers, extending themselves so as to cover the supposed front of a squadron, and some paces be­yond each of its flanks The right troopers oblique to the right, the left troopers to the left. As soon as they are in line they return sabre, and take the position of raise— pistol. They continue to march until the signal halt, No. 2.The instructor causes the halt to he sounded, when the skirmishers are 100 or 150 paces from the reserve The troopers keep 10 paces interval, regulating themselves toward the guide during the whole time they act as skirmishers.

If a less or greater interval is desired, the command would be given:

 

1 Eight files from right as skirmishers, at (so many) paces.

2.  MARCH.

 

The guide for lines of skirmishers will habitually be at the centre, and so need not be designated in the command; the instructor names the man. But if it he desired that the guide should be right or left, it will be expressed after the command, MARCH.

297—The chief of the platoon, followed by his trumpeter, places himself habitually halfway between the skirmishers and the reserve ; he moves along the line wherever he thinks his presence most necessary. The reserve and the skirmishers execute their movements at the signals of the trumpeter who follows the officer, or at his commands

If the chief of the platoon wishes the skirmishers to move forward, he causes the forward, No I, to be sounded; each skirmisher moves forward, regulating his movements by those of the guide, and preserving his interval; the reserve follows them, keeping at its proper distance.

To move the skirmishers who are at a halt, or moving



 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

forward, by their right flank, to the right, No. 4is sounded; each trooper turns to the right and marches in the direc­tion of those who precede him preserving his distance the reserve also turns to the right.

To face the skirmishers again to the front and to move forward, to the left, No 3is sounded; the skirmishers and the reserve turn to the left.

To move the skirmishers who are at a halt or moving forward by their left flank, to the left. No 3is sounded; each skirmisher turns to the left and marches in the direc­tion of those who precede him, preserving his distance; the reserve also turns to the left.

To move the skirmishers again to the front, to the right No. 4 is sounded; the skirmishers and the reserve turn to the right

The direction of the flank march of the skirmishers will be changed at the order of their commander.

To change the front of the line, change direction to the right, No. 6, or, change direction to the left, No 7, is sounded; the first flank will halt, and the wheeling flank continue its previous gait

At the signal halt, under all circumstances the skirmishers face to the front. (to the enemy.)

If the skirmishers are to retire without firing, the about No. 5 is sounded.

During the flank movements, if the troopers are to fire, they leave the column a few paces and face the enemy for that purpose as soon as they have fired, they resume their places in the column in doubling the gait

298.—When it is desired that a line of skirmishers en­gaged shall retire firing, the commander of the platoon orders the retreat to be sounded. At this signal all the troopers who are numbers I and 3, fire, if loaded, together, then turn to the left about and move to the rear They turn by trooper to the right about on the most favorable ground from 40 to 60 yards in rear, to cover the retreat or the line of twos and fours; which then immediately fires. (an enemy being within fire,) and turns by trooper to the



 

PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

left about and retires through the Intervals of, and turns when it is 40 to 60 yards in rear of, the line of ones and threes; who then fire and retire, and so on. The troopers of the line next to the enemy keep up the fire if oppor­tunities offer; and it is only the files which have opportunity of effective fire, who fire at the moment before the line turns about, which it does all together.

The reserve retires and faces to the front, regulating its movement by that of the skirmishers, so as to be about 60 paces from the 2d line.

At a signal, forward No. 1, or halt No. 2, the line of skirmishers in rear move up.

If the line be retreating without firing, at the signal, commence firing, Nos. 1 and 3 would move on, whilst Nos. 2 and 4 would halt and face the enemy, and all would act as prescribed for firing in retreat. If the line be firing in re­treat, at the signal to cease fire the line most retired would await the other, and the retreat would be continued in one line

299.—The rallying of skirmishers is always made on the point occupied by the officer.

To rally the skirmishers, the officer places himself habitually in front of the reserve, and causes the rally to be sounded. At this signal the skirmishers turn left about, rally on the reserve by the shortest route, and draw sabre.

If the officer is not with the reserve when the rally Is sounded, the skirmishers rally upon him, and the reserve comes up and joins them.  The troopers are thus exercised to rally upon any point whatever of the line.

300 —If a defile is presented in advance of the front of the line, and orders are given to pass it, the troopers who are opposite first enter it; they are followed by the other troopers, who turn, by trooper, to the left and to the right for that purpose.

As soon as the first have passed the defile, they move 50 or 60 paces to the front and halt; the others come up abreast of them by obliquing, those of the right to the right, and those of the left to the left. The reserve follows.

 


 

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If the skirmishers are to pass a defile in their rear, the reserve passes it rapidly, and posts itself 50 or 60 paces on the side of its outlet, facing it. When the line is within 50 or 60 paces, the two troopers, who are on the flanks, turn about and move toward the entrance of the defile, and entering together immediately pass it. They are followed closely by the other troopers, who execute, in succession, the same movements; the centre troopers, who cover the passage of the defile, being the last

On emerging from the defile, the troopers oblique to the right and left, reforming the line with the same intervals.

301.—These movements are first executed at the walk, then at the trot, and finally at the gallop. When the troopers have learned to perform these movements well, they are exercised at them in firing. When the troopers are at the walk or gallop, and the instructor wishes them to pass to the trot, the trot No. 8 is sounded; when at the trot or gallop, and he wishes them to walk, he orders the halt No. 2, and the forward No. 1, to be sounded.

302.—To commence, or cease tiring, the signal is sounded. All the troopers do not fire at once, but one after another, commencing at the guide. They afterward continue tiring without waiting for each other, except by couples. Nos. I and 2, and Nos. 3and 4; these have an understanding that they fire alternately, giving each other a mutual support.

303.—When the platoon skirmishes without gaining ground to the front, the skirmishers should nevertheless, when under fire, if not behind a cover, keep in motion, each about his own ground.

304.—If the commander of the platoon wishes the skir­mishers to charge, he orders the charge as foragers, No 12. to he sounded, the troopers return pistol, draw sabre, and charge.

In the charge as foragers, the even numbers approach within 2 or 3 paces of their companions, Nos. I and 3, to be able to support and protect each other.

As soon as the skirmishers charge, the reserve moves forward to support them.


 

PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

Theskirmishers retire by turning about to the left, and facing      to the front by turning about to the right. When they are formed in platoon, they return the pistol to the holster and draw the sabre.

305.-- To relieve skirmishers, the instructor commands to the reserve:

I.       As skirmishers.

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, the reserve disperses and moves with regular intervals five paces beyond the line of old skirm­ishers. The old skirmishers turn left about and rally at a trot on the officer, who, during the movement, is placed at the point where the 8 files now become the reserve should re­form.

The platoon right guide then takes command of them.

306.—The troopers having been sufficiently exercised in all the movement, of skirmishing, will be taught to dismount and form with celerity to fight on foot.

At the commencement all the movements of this instruc­tion will be decomposed, in order to make them better understood.

The platoon being in line, the instructor commands:

 

Prepare to fight --ON FOOT.

 

1 time, 3 motions.

 

1. At the command, all prepare to dismount, except Nos. 4.

2.   Dismount, except Nos. 4, and form rank.

3. Nos. 1, 2, and 3 pass the reins with the right hand over the horses heads; Note. 3 hand their reins to Nos. 4 to hold, and Nos. 1 and 2 tie their reins to the cheek piece and nose hand of the halters and bridles of the horses of Nos 2 and 3 by a tight slip knot, and with only about one foot play; then all face to the front, and hook up their sabres.



 

 

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The instructor then commands:

 

lnto—Line.

 

At this command, move twelve paces to the front, and close in on the centre.

Nos 4, who remain on horseback, have charge of the dismounted horses; they take the end of the reins of the first dismounted horse in the left hand, holding them near the bit with the right hand, the nails downward; a non­commissioned officer remains with the dismounted horses to direct them.

The troopers having been sufficiently exercised at the different movements of this instruction, will be required to execute them rapidly without stopping at the several mo­tions, and at the single command, prepare to fight—ON FOOT, given by the instructor.

The platoon being formed, it will be conducted where it is to fight on foot.

The dismounted horses will also be exercised in changing position, by marching by rank and by fours.

When the instructor wishes the troopers to remount, he will rally them if they are dispersed as skirmishers.

The platoon being rallied and formed, the instructor commands:

 

ABOUT—FACE.

 

He conducts the platoon to within 12 paces of the hors, and commands:

 

MOUNT.

 

At this command the troopers return to their horses rap­idly, without alarming them; return pistol, mount, and draw sabre.



 

PLATOON, MOUNTED.

 

 

The command, MOUNT, at the commencement, will be executed in 4 motions, and from a halt, that the troopers may better understand it. For this purpose, the platoon being rallied and marching to the rear, is halted 12 paces from the hoses; the instructor then commands:

 

MOUNT.

 

1 time,  4 motions.

 

1.   At the last part of the command, which is MOUNT, re­turn pistol.

2.   Rejoin the horses, untie the horse, pass the reins over the neck, unhook the sabre, and take the position of the trooper before mounting, prescribed, No. 79.

3.   Execute the two times of prepare to mount, as pre­scribed, No. 80.

4.   Mount, as prescribed, No. 80; adjust the reins, and draw the sabre.


 

SCHOOL OF THE



 

 

SCHOOL OF THE SQUADRON,

MOUNTED.

 

307 —The object of the school of the squadron is to instruct the platoons to execute together what they have been taught separately; and so, to prepare the squadron to act independently, or perform what it will be required to do when a part of the regiment.

The squadron is composed as prescribed, title 1st, arti­cle 1st.

The school of the squadron being the base of the evolutions of the regiment, the Captain observes that the chiefs of platoons execute with regularity what is required of them, and that they give the commands at the proper time and in the proper tone. He requires the guides to act with calmness and without hesitation in the different move­ments.

The Captain causes the officers to alternate in the com­mand of the platoons, that they may become familiar with all the positions in the squadron.  He observes the same course with the non-commissioned officers who command platoons.

To make the formations in line better understood, they are executed at first from a halt. In this case each platoon performs its movements separately and successively, at the command of its chief, on receiving notice from the Captain.

Each movement, after having been correctly executed by the right, is repeated by the left. Habitual formations and dressing by the right causes the horses to carry a habit to a vicious extreme, and crowd and press that flank.

When the squadron has acquired calmness and confidence, and one article is well understood, this article is repeated with sabres drawn, and alternately at all the gaits, except the wheels to the right, to the left, to the right about, and to the left about by fours, the counter march, the wheels on a movable pivot by squadron, the individual oblique marches


 

 

SQUADRON, MOUNTED.



when marching by squadron, which are executed only at the walk and at the trot.

The troopers mount and dismount by the times, but with­out explanation.

The squadron is exercised at the manual of arms and sabre exercise once a week.

The Captain requires the distance between the platoons to be observed exactly in all the movements; he sees that the troopers preserve the required intervals between the knees; the distances in column of fours; and especially the pivots of platoons, who must understand the necessity of, and practice, exactitude.

The Captain moves wherever his presence is most re­quired; the troopers are required to observe absolute silence, and all rectifications are done by signs, or in a low voice After the command, halt, every individual must remain motionless.

All columns right in front having the guide left, and when left in front having the guide right, as a general rule, the troopers will understand it; and the guide is not com­manded unless in exceptional cases. When a commander sees it necessary, he will direct attention to the alignment by commanding: Guide left, or guide right.

A platoon being an integral force, it can march or fight, equally, whether at the right or the left of any other platoon.

The squadron will be accustomed to feel equally confi­dent in sudden formations in every direction.

Columns are right in front when the subdivisions originally on the right in line are in front; and left in front when those of the original left are in front.

308. —The squadron being formed in line, the non-com­missioned officers and troopers at the head of their horses, the chiefs of platoon mounted, at 8 paces from, and facing the centre of their platoons, the Captain commands:

1.       Attention.

2.       Rzght—DRESS.

3.       FRONT.



 

 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

He then commands:

      In each platoon—COUNT——FOURS.

 

At this command the troopers count off in the four platoons at once, commencing on the right.

The Captain then gives the command to mount.

At the command, form—RANK, the chiefs of platoon move forward, face to the front by turning to the right about, and place themselves before the centre of their platoons, the croup of their horses one pace from the heads of the horses of the platoon.

 

 

 

SUCCESSIVE ALIGNMENT OF PLATOONS IN THE SQUADRON

 

300.—The squadron being in line, the Captain places the two non-commissioned officers, guides of the right and left, upon a line parallel to, and 30 paces in front of, the squad­ron, facing each other, and 3 platoon fronts apart.

On receiving notice from the Captain, the chief of the first platoon commands: 1. Forward;  2. Guide right; 3. MARCH.

At the command, MARCH, the platoon moves forward; at one pace from the guide, the chief of the platoon commands: 1. HALT; 2. Right—DRESS.

At the command, HALT, the chief of the platoon moves on and halts with the head of his horse against the boot of the guide of the right. The platoon is aligned so that the heads of their horses are in a line one pace behind the croup of the horse of the chief of platoon.

The first platoon being correctly aligned, the Captain commands:

 

I.       By platoon—DRESS

At the first command, the chief of the second platoon commands: 1. Forward; 2. Guide right ; 3. MARCH. The

 

SQUADRON , MOUNTED.




heads of the platoon horses having reached the line of the croups of the horses of the platoon on the right, he com­mands: 1. HALT; 2. DRESS; and, at the same time, moves forward on the line of the chief of that platoon.

At the command, HALT, the platoon stops. At the com­mand DRESS, all the troopers move forward together upon the alignment.

Each chief of platoon executes successively the same movement, commanding MARCH when the one who precedes him has commanded HALT.

The chief of the fourth platoon brings the head of his horse to the boot of the left guide.

The squadron being aligned, the Captain commands:

 

FRONT.

 

310.—The Captain observes that the officers align them­selves promptly on the base of the alignment; that they do not suffer too much time to elapse between the com­mands HALT and DRESS, so as not to retard the successive alignments; he also observes that the non-commissioned officers pay attention to the general and not individual alignment.

 

 

 

ALIGNMENT OF THE SQUADRON.

 

311.—The Captain, after having placed the right guide so that no trooper will be compelled to rein-back, com­mands:

 

1.       Right—DRESS

2.       FRONT.

 

At the command, right—DRESS, all the troopers correct their distance from the chiefs of platoon, and align them­selves steadily but promptly to the right.


 

SCHOOL OF THE



 

THE SQUADRON BEING IN LINE TO FORM A

COLUMN OF FOURS.

 

312.        The squadron being in line, the Captain commands:

 

1.       Fours right, (or left)

2.       MARCH.

3.       HALT.

 

At the command, MARCH, each set of fours wheels to the right as prescribed, No. 283; the chief of the first platoon places himself in front of the column, the right guide on his right. The chiefs of the other platoons one pace from the flank of the heads of their platoons.

If the Captain omit the command, HALT, the column moves forward

The squadron marching in line, the Captain commands:

 

Fours—Right, (or left.)

 

The squadron conforms throughout to what is prescribed, No. 285.

 

TO BREAK THE SQUADRON BY FOURS TO THE RIGHT OR LEFT TO MARCH TO THE FRONT.

 

313.—The squadron being in line, the Captain com­mands:

 

1.       Right (or left) forward—fours right, (or left)

2.       MARCH.

 

At the first command, the chief of the platoon and guide place themselves in front of the four on the right (or left) of the squadron.

At the command, MARCH, they move straight forward; every other set of fours in the line wheels to the right (or



 

SQUADRON, MOUNTED.

 

left) and moves forward; but that next to the flank set turns when it has made two-thirds of its wheel, (four yards,) following the flank set; and all the others, in succession, turn on the same ground.

314. The squadron marching in line, the Captain commands:

 

Right(or Left) forward—FOURSRIGHT, (or LEFT.)

Which will be executed on the same principles.

 

T0 BREAK THE SQUADRON BY FOURS FROM THE RIGHT TO MARCH TO THE LEFT.

 

315.—The squadron being in line, the Captain com­mands:

 

I.       Fours from the right—to march to the left.

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, the four on the right move for­ward, and having marched 6 paces, the chief of the first platoon commands, Left—TURN. When the turn is half completed the next set of fours moves forward, and so each, in succession, marching 6 paces forward and turning to the left without command.

The squadron will break from the left to march to the right, on the same principles, at the command, 1. Fours from the left—to march to the right. 2. MARCH.

This is a movement of mere occasional convenience.

 

 

DIRECT MARCH IN COLUMN OF FOURS.

 

316.—When the column is halted, the Captain assures himself that the officers and men are placed as prescribed; he commands:

 

1.       Forward.

2.       MARCH.

 

SCHOOL OF THE



 

317.—The object of this march in column being to calm the horses and make them uniform and steady in the dif­ferent gaits, the troopers will endeavor to keep their horses as quiet as possible; hut the Captain requires them to con­form to all the principles of the direct march ; he observes that the ranks of fours are exactly aligned ; that the files march in the same direction ; that the troopers preserve intervals and distances; conduct their horses without em­ploying more force than necessary, and preserve the proper position of the body and bridle-hand.

318 —The column having marched a quarter of an hour at least, the Captain commands:

1.       Trot.

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, the troopers take the trot, always taking care not to fret their horses.

When the column has marched about 1,000 paces at the trot, the Captain commands:

 

1.       Walk.

2.       MARCH.

Having marched some time at the walk, they resume the trot, and after marching again about 1,000 paces, they pass to the walk.

To change the gait, the Captain selects a moment when the horses are calm and march uniformly; all the troopers assume, at the same time and with steadiness, the gait in­dicated

319—To halt the column, the Captain commands:

I.      Column.

2.     HALT.

 

CHANGE OF DIRECTION.

 

320.—The squadron marching in column of fours, or twos or file, to change the direction, the Captain commands:

Column left, (or right)



 

SQUADRON, MOUNTED.

 

Which Ii executed as prescribed, No. 211, the chief of the leading platoon giving the command:

 

Left--TURN.

 

 

INDIVIDUAL OBLIQUE MARCH.

 

321.—The squadron marching in column of fours or twos, to cause it to execute the individual oblique march, the captain commands:

 

1.       Left (or right) oblique.

2.       MARCH.

Which is executed as prescribed, No. 213.

 

THE SQUADRON MARCHING IN COLUMN OF FOURS, TO MARCH TO THE REAR.

 

322 —The squadron marching In column of fours, the Captain commands:

 

Fours—LEFT ABOUT, (or RIGHT ABOUT.)

 

The fours wheeling about and moving forward; the column being changed from right to left in front, or the reverse.

 

TO BREAK BY FOURS TO THE RIGHT, COLUMN HALF LEFT, RIGHT, OR HALF RIGHT.

 

323.—The squadron being in line, the Captain com­mands:

1.  Fours right—oolumn half left, (right, or half right.)

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, each met of fours wheels to the

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

right, and the chief of the first platoon instantly com­mands: 1. Left—TURN. 2. FORWARD. (Omitting the 2d command if it be a full turn—to the “right.’)

The squadron is broken to the left, and the direction changed to the half-right, left, or half-left, on the same prin­ciples.

 

 

THE SQUADRON MARCHING IN COLUMN BY FOURS, BY TWOS, AND BY FILE, TO FORM LINE FACED TO THE FRONT, TO THE LEFT, TO THE RIGHT, AND TO THE REAR.

 

324 —The squadron marching in column by fours, right in front, the Captain commands:

I.       Left—front into line.

2.      MARCH.

3.       DRESS.

4.      FRONT.

At the command, MARCH, the first four files continue to march straight forward; when they have marched 30 paces, the chief of the first platoon commands: HALT.

At this command the first four halt square to the front, the right guide returns to the right of the squadron. All the other files oblique and come up successively, and with­out the commands of the chief of platoon, form to the left and upon the alignment of the first, as prescribed, No. 214.

The Captain, who moves to the right flank after the command. MARCH, commands the alignment when the chief of the first platoon commands HALT

As soon as the chiefs of platoon arrive upon the line. they place themselves at the centre of their platoons an’l align themselves.

The left guide takes his post on the left of the squadron, when the four last files arrive upon the line.


 

SQUADRON, MOUNTED.

 

The columns of twos, and by file, are formed into line by the same principles and at the same commands.

325 —-The column of fours marching right in front, or at a halt, to form it In line, faced the left, on its left flank, the Captain commands:

 

1.       Left into line wheel.

2.       MARCH.

3.       Right—DRESS.

4.      FRONT.

 

It is executed throughout as prescribed, No. 220.

The chiefs of platoons not repeating the commands, they align themselves, and the guides take their places on the right and left.

326.—The column of fours marching right in front, to form line faced to the right, upon the prolongation and in advance of its right flank, the Captain commands:

 

1.       On right into line.

2.       MARCH.

3.       DRESS.

4.      FRONT.

 

At the command, MARCH, the leading four turn to the right, and march straight forward; when they have marched 20 paces, the chief of the first platoon commands : HALT

At this command they halt, and the right guide takes his place on the right of the squadron. All the other fours continue to march forward and turn and come up succes­sively without the commands of the chiefs of platoon, forming to the left and upon the alignment of the first, as prescribed, No. 217, observing to keep themselves square in the same direction before turning to the right, so as not to approach the new line before the proper time

The Captain, the chiefs of platoon, and the left guide, conform to what is prescribedfor left—front into line, No. 324.  The column by file, or twos forms line on the same prin­ciples, and at the same commands.

327—The column of foursmarching, right in front, to


 

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form line faced to the rear, on the rear of the column, the Captain first commands: Fours—LEFT ABOUT; which is ex­ecuted as in No. 277; and then: 1. Right—front into line; 2. MARCH; 3. DRESS: 4. FRONT; which is executed as pre­scribed, No. 124. To form the line on the head of the column, the Captain first commands: 1. Right—front into line; 2. MARCH; 3. DRESS; 4 FRONT; and then : 1. Fours left about; 2. MARCH; 3. HALT; 4. Right—DRESS; 5. FRONT.

328.—The columns marching left in front, to form line faced to the front, left, right, and rear, Nos. 324, 325, 326, and 327, is executed on the same principles, by inverse commands and means.

 

329.—A squadron in column of fours, right in front, having occasion to make instant face to the right, the Captain commands: 1. Right into line wheel; 2. MARCH; 3. Right— DRESS 4. FRONT; and there being a necessity to form front into line, with an obstacle to the left-front, the Captain commands: Right front into line; 2. MARCH; 3 DRESS; 4. FRONT; which would be executed as has been prescribed; the proper left would be considered the “right;” the left, the “right guide,” &c , as long as that formation continued.

The column being left in front, under inverse circumstances, lines would be formed on the same principles as above, and by inverse commands and means.

The same principle applies to the formation of line faced to the rear, hut generally with an obstacle to the left— right in front—line might be formed on the head of the column; or, with obstacle to the right, on the rear of the column; and left in front, the reverse.

 

330 —The squadron marching in column by tows, or by file, right in front, to form line faced to the left, the captain commands:

 

1.       Left into line.

2.       MARCH.

3.       DRESS.

4.      FRONT.



 

SQUADRON, MOUNTED.

 

Which is executed by the leading platoon, as prescribed, No. 218, the chief giving the command, HALT, only; the other platoons form also the same, but without any further commands; the chiefs of platoon align themselves, and the guides take their posts on the right and left.

331 —The column by twos, or by file, left in front, to form line faced to the right, the Captain commands: 1. Right into line; 2. MARCH; 3. DRESS; 4. FRONT; which is executed on the same principle by inverse means.

332—-In all these formations greater regularity is required in the execution, as the troopers become more habituated to them, and the horses become more calm.

The first instruction is repeated several successive days; and when the principles of the direct march in column by fours, the changes of direction, the obliques, and the dif­ferent formations in line are firmly impressed, all these movements are executed at the trot, and then at the gallop.

 

TO REGULATE THE RAPIDITY OF THE GAITS.

 

333.—When the marches and formations, prescribed above, have given sufficient uniformity and precision to the gait, the Captain will regulate their rapidity. For this purpose he measures off a mile, if practicable, and marches over it at all the gaits; the mile at a walk, in sixteen minutes; at a trot, in eight minutes; and at the gallop, in six minutes.

 

SABRE EXERCISE.

 

334 —To practice the sabre exercise at a halt, the squad­ron being in line, the Captain commands:

 

For Sabre Exercise—CALLOFF.

 

At this command, the trooper on the right calls out, “20 :‘ the next man calls out, “15 ;“ the third man. “ 10 ;‘ the fourth, “5;” the fifth man, “stand fast ;“ the sixth, “20 ;‘ the seventh, 15;” the eighth, “10 ;“ the



 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

ninth, “5 ;“ the tenth, “stand fast ;“ and in the same manner through to the left.

The Captain then commands:

Sabre Exercise— MARCH.

 

At this command, those troopers who have called out ‘20,’’ march forward 20 paces and halt; those who have called “ 15,’’ march forward 15 paces and halt, and so on; the fifth men standing fast.

During the exercise, the commander of the 2d platoon is placed 10 paces in front of the right of it; of the 3d platoon, 10 paces in front of its left; they face their pla­toons.  The commanders of the 1st and 4th platoons superintend their platoons from the right and left flank.

335.—Theexercise being concluded, the Captain com­mands :

I.       Into line—MARCH.

2.       Right—Dress.

3.       FRONT.

 

Atthe command, MARCH. the troopers who advanced 20 paces standing fast, the others move forward and halt abreast of them.

336—The squadron being in line, the Captain commands it to dismount, and to file off. The Captain and chiefs of platoons remain mounted in order to superintend the movement; the latter until the last trooper of their platoons has filed off.

 

 

ARTICLE SECOND.

 

 

THE SQUADRON BEING IN LINE, TO FORM IT IN OPEN COLUMN.

 

337.—The Captain commands:

 

1.       Platoons, right wheel.

2.       MARCH.

3.       HALT (or 3. FORWARD)



 

SQUADRON, MOUNTED.

 

At the command, MARCH, each platoon executes its wheel to the right, following the principles of the wheel on a fixed pivot, the marching flanks taking care to step off promptly together; the three left platoons carefully regu­lating by the right, so that they all complete the quarter circle at the same moment.

At the command, HALT, the marching flanks and all the troopers halt at the same instant, and remain motionless

The Captain commands HALT, so that, when executed, the wheels will be completed.

The chiefs of platoon, without leaving the centre of their platoons, observe that the movement is correctly executed; after the wheels, if any guide finds himself not in the di­rection of the one preceding him, he should not endeavor to correct his position until after the march is commenced.

During the movement, the guide passes to the rear of the second file from the left of the fourth platoon

The Captain assures himself that each officer and non­commissioned officer preserves the place assigned to him in this order of column. (Title 1st, article 2d.)

If the Captain, instead of HALT, gives the command, 3.FORWARD, the platoons move straight forward; the com­mand, FORWARD, being given the moment before the wheels are completed.  The Captain then gives a point of direction to the guide of the column.

338.—The squadron marching in line, to form it in open column, it is done on the same principles, at the same com­mands, the pivots halting at the command, MARCH.

To form the open column left in front is executed on the same principle, by inverse means, at the commands, 1. Platoons left wheel; 2. MARCH; 3. HALT.

 

TO MARCH IN OPEN COLUMN.

 

339.—In this order of column, the guides should preserve between them a distance equal to the front of their pla­toons, and regulate their gait upon that of the preceding


 

SCHOOL OF THE

 

guide; his gait is regulated by the chief of the leading platoon.

The preservation of the distances being the most essential point of the march in column, everything else should yield to it but the guides must endeavor to avoid changing the gait as much as possible, without the command; and if it happens that their distance is increased or diminished, the fault is repaired gradually and with steadiness.

The chiefs of platoon are answerable for the preservation of the distance, which, measured from the croup of the horses of one platoon to the head of the horses of the next platoon, is three paces or yards less than the number of troopers in the platoon.

The unevenness of the ground may make it sometimes impossible to preserve the direction of the guides; it is then sufficient to require the guide of each platoon to pass by the same points as the guide of the preceding platoon.

The leading platoon of a column should always com­mence the march moderately, in order to give the column time, from head to foot, to take a uniform and regular movement.

340 —The squadron being in open column, the Captain commands:

 

I.       Forward.

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, all the platoons put themselves inmotion at the same time.

Before the column commences the march, the Captain gives the guide of the first platoon a point of direction; this non-commissioned officer selects intermediate points, so as to be sure of marching straight. The fixed object given to the guide of the first platoon is also pointed out to the guide of the second. These two non-commissioned officers preserve during the march, the direction which has been given to them.

The guides of the third and fourth platoons keep exactly in the same direction.



 

SQUADRON, MOUNTED.

 

CHANGES OF DIRECTION BY SUCCESSIVE

WHEELS.

 

341.—In the open column the changes of direction are executed by successive wheels on a movable pivot, so that the march of the column may not be retarded. The arc of circle described by the pivots should be of 5 paces long.

The column being in march, to change the direction, the Captain commands:

 

Column left, or half left, (or right, or half right.)

 

At this command, the chief of the leading platoon com­mands: 1. Left—TURN; 2. FORWARD; which Is executed on the principles of the wheel upon a movable pivot.

Each chief of platoon gives the same commands succes­sively, so that his platoon may turn upon the same ground.

Immediately after having changed the direction of the column, the Captain gives a new point of direction to the guide of the first platoon.

The exact preservation of distances, after the changes of direction, depends upon the equality of the increase given to the gait by the marching flanks. It is then important that the leading platoon should turn neither too rapidly nor too slowly; and that each platoon should regulate the rapidity of its wheel by that of the one which precedes it.

 

INDIVIDUAL OBLIQUE MARCH.

 

342.—The squadron marching in open column, right In front, to cause it to gain ground towards one of its flanks, without changing the front of the column, the Captain commands:

 

1.   Left (or right) oblique,

2.   MARCH.



 

SCHOOL OF THE


 

Which is executed at the same time, In each platoon, as prescribed, No. 270.

The guides of the three last platoons pay attention to preserve their distances, and to keep in a direction exactly parallel to that o the guide of the first platoon.

To resume the primitive direction, the Captain com­mands:

FORWARD.

 

Which is executed at the same time, in each platoon, as prescribed, No. 270

 

CHANGE OF GAIT IN OPEN COLUMN.

 

343.—The column is made to pass from the walk to the trot, and from the trot tothe walk; and when the platoons execute these changes of gait with uniformity and steadi­ness, the column is made to commence the march at a trot; and to halt while marching at the trot.

The Captain observes that the platoons halt, step off, and change the gait at the same instant.

He directs the head of the column sometimes to increase or diminish the gait slightly, without command, to judge of the attention of the guides, and to habituate them to conforming to the movements of the guides who precede them.

 

 

TO BREAK BY FOURS, BY TWOS, AND BY FILE, TO FORM TWOS, FOURS, AND PLA­TOONS, AT THE SAME GAIT.

 

344 —The squadron marching in open column, right in front, to break by fours at the same gait, the Captain commands:

 

1.        By fours.

2.        MARCH.



 

 

SQUADRON, MOUNTED


 

At the first command, the chief of the first platoon places himself one pace in front of the third file from the right; the right guide places himself on his right.

At the command, MARCH, each platoon breaks by fours, as prescribed, No. 209.

345—The squadron marching in column by fours, right In front, to break by twos, at the same gait, the Captain commands:

 

1. By twos.

2. MARCH.

This is executed throughout the squadron, as prescribed for the platoon, No. 228.

346.—The squadron marching in column by twos, right in front, to break by file at the same gait, the Captain com­mands:

 

1.       By file.

2.       MARCH.

Which is executed as prescribed, No. 345, to break by twos; the right guide placing himself behind the chief of the first platoon.

347.—The squadron marching in open column at the trot, right in front, to break by fours, at the same gait, the Captain commands:

 

1.       By fours.

2.       MARCH.

At the command, MARCH, each platoon breaks by fours, as prescribed, No. 273.

The same principles are applicable to breaking by twos and by file, throughout the squadron, as in the platoon, No. 230.

348.—When the open column is at the gallop, these move­ments are executed on the principles just prescribed, each platoon, except its right set of fours, passing to the trot, and resuming successively the gallop, as the fours oblique, in order to enter the column; and to to break by twos or file, the whole column, except the leading two, or one, passing


 

SCHOOL OF THE


 

to the trot, and resuming the gallop as the files break, in order to enter the column.

349 —The squadron marching In column by file, right in front, to form twos at the same gait, the Captain com­mands:

 

1.       Form twos.

2.       MARCH.

 

This is executed throughout the squadron, as prescribed for the platoon, No. 225.

350 —The squadron marching in column by twos, right in front, to form fours, at the same gait, the Captain com­mands:

 

I.       Form fours.

2.       MARCH.

 

Which is executed as prescribed, No. 349, in order to form twos.

351—The squadron marching in column by fours, right in front, to form platoon at the same gait, the Captain commands:

 

1.       Form platoons.

2.       MARCH.

3.       HALT.

 

At the command, MARCH, each platoon is formed as pre­scribed, No. 275; after marching 20 paces, the Captain gives the command, HALT, when each platoon halts.

352.—When the column of fours is at the trot, each platoon at once conforms to No. 276; the Captain omits the command guide left.

In the column by file, or by twos, at the trot, to form twos or four, those leading the squadron pass to the walk.

When the column is at the gallop, to form twos, fours, and platoons, the same principles are observed.



SQUADRON, MOUNTED

 

TO BREAK BY FOURS, BY TWOS, AND BY FILE; TO FORM TWOS, FOURS, AND PLA­TOONS, IN DOUBLING THE GAIT.

 

353 —The squadron marching in open column, right In front, to break by fours, In doubling the gait, the Captain commands:

1.       By fours—trot.

2.       MARCH.

 

At the first command, the chief of the first platoon and the right guide place themselves as prescribed, No. 344.

At the command, MARCH, each platoon breaks by fours, as prescribed, No. 278.

To break by twos and by file is executed throughout the squadron, as prescribed for the platoon, Nos. 236, 237.

354 —When the column is at the trot, to break at the gallop, the same principles are observed at the commands:

1.   By fours—gallop; 2 MARCH.

When the column is at the gallop, these movements are always executed at the same gait, as prescribed, No. 348

355 —The squadron marching in column by file, to form twos, in doubling the gait, the Captain commands:

1.       Form twos—trot.

2.       MARCH

This is executed throughout the squadron, as prescribed for the platoon, No. 232.

356.—The squadron marching in column by twos, to form fours, in doubling the gait, the Captain commands:

1.       Form fours—trot.

2.   MARCH.

 

Which is executed as prescribed, No. 355, In order to form twos.

357.—The squadron marching in column by fours, to form platoon, in doubling the gait, the Captain commands:

 


SCHOOL OF THE

 

1.       Form platoons—trot.

2.       MARCH.

 

At the command, MARCH, each platoon Is formed at once, as prescribed, No. 281.

358.—When the column is at the trot, these formations are executed at the gallop, following the same principles.

When the column is at the gallop, these movements are executed as prescribed, No 352, the head of the column, or the heads of platoons, as the case may be, passing to the trot at the command MARCH.

The open column marching left in front, It breaks by fours, by twos, and by file, at the same gait, and in doubling the gait, on the same principles, by inverse means, at the com­mands: 1. By the left—by fours, (by twos or by file.) 2. MARCH.

359.—The foregoing movements are employed in passing defiles, the Captain placing himself always at the head of his squadron in order to direct the movements of it accord­ing to the localities.

 

 

THE SQUADRON MARCHING IN OPEN COL­UMN, TO MARCH TO THE REAR.

 

 

360.—The squadron marching in open column, the cap­tain commands:

 

1.      Platoons left about wheel, (or right about wheel.)

2.       MARCH.

3.       FORWARD.

 

At the first command, the trooper on the left of each platoon, who becomes the pivot, prepares to halt, without however slackening his pace.

At the command, MARCH, the pivots halt, and the marching flanks wheel at the gait in which the column was


 

SQUADRON, MOUNTED.



 

marching, regulating themselves upon the outer flank of the platoon at the head of the column, so as to complete the first half of the movement at the same instant.

The marching flanks are then governed by the platoon, which becomes the head of the column after the movement Is completed.

The movement being nearly finished, the Captain com­mands: FORWARD.

During this movement, the right and left guides of the squadron invert their positions, the one in front being always aligned with the platoon, the one in rear behind the last platoon.

 

 

TO HALT THE COLUMN.

 

 

361 —The column being on the march, to halt it, the Captain commands:

 

1.       Column.

2.       HALT.

 

At the first command, all the platoons prepare to halt.

At the command, HALT, all the platoons halt at the same time.

After the command, HALT, there should be no movement In the platoons, the distances and directions should be cor­rected only in marching.

The Captain places himself behind the guide of the second platoon, to see if the guides of the first and second platoon have marched upon the point indicated; he also observes if the prescribed distances have been preserved. If they have not been, and if the guides have not marched upon the point indicated, the column is put again In march, in order to correct their distances and direction.

 



SCHOOL OF THE

 

THE SQUADRON MARCHING IN OPEN COLUMN, TO FORM LINE, FACED TO THE LEFT, TO THE RIGHT, TO THE FRONT, AND TO THE REAR.

 

362.—The squadron being in open column, right in front, to form it in line faced to the left, on its left flank, the Captain commands:

 

1.       Left into line wheel.

2.       MARCH.

3.       Right—DRESS.

4.      FRONT.

 

At the first command, the right guide moves upon the prolongation of the direction of the guides of the column, at the distance of the front of a platoon, facing the side towards which the line will be formed.

At the command, MARCH, the squadron wheels into line, the trooper on the left of each platoon serving as pivot, and turning upon his own ground and the fore feet of his horses.

The Captain commands, right—DRESS, the moment the marching flanks have nearly completed their movement.

At this command all the platoons align themselves.

The squadron being aligned, the Captain commands, FRONT.

During the wheel the left guide resumes his place in line.

363.—The Captain observes that the pivots execute their movements properly, and that the officers and troopers align themselves correctly.

The guide, who moves upon the prolongation of the guides of the column, should take rather too much ground than not enough. The conductor of the marching flank of the leading platoon should align himself upon this guide, without endeavoring to approach him.


 

 

SQUADRON, MOUNTED.

 

364.—To form line to the left, on It. left flank, from open column, left in front, the commands are the same, and are executed in the same manner, except that the left guide takes his place where the right of the fourth platoon Is to rest; and the right guide resumes his place in line, (on the left.)

365.—To form the squadron in open column, left in front, the Captain commands: I Platoons, left wheel; 2 MARCH; 3. HALT; which is executed as prescribed, No. 337, but by Inverse means.

366.—The squadron being in open column, left In front, to form it In line, faced to the right, on its right flank, the Captain commands: 1. Right into line wheel; 2. MARCH; 3. Left—DRESS; 4 FRONT; which is executed as prescribed, No. 362, but by inverse means.

367.—To form line to the right, on its right flank, from open column, right in front, the commands are the same, and are executed in the same manner, with the exception of No. 304; the actions of the right and left guides being Inverse

368.—The column marching, the formations of line to the left and right may be made the same, and at the same com­mands; the pivots halting at the command, MARCH.

369.—The squadron marching in open column, right or left in front, to form line to the left or right, without halting, the Captain commands:

 

I.       Platoons left (or right) wheel.

2.      MARCH.

3.       FORWARD

4.      Guide right (or left.)

 

The marching flanks will regulate by that of the platoon at the head of the column. The pivots, halting at the word MARCH, promptly move off together at the command, FORWARD

This movement is executed at all the gaits.

370.—The squadron marching in open column, to form

 


SCHOOL OF THE


 

line, faced to the right or left, on the prolongation and In advance of its right or left flank, the Captain commands:

1.       On right into line, (or on left into line)

2.       MARCH.

3.       Guide right, (or left.)

4.       FRONT.

 

At the first command, the chief of the first platoon com­mands: Right.

At the command, MARCH, he commands: TURN; the platoon turns to the right and moves forward at the com­mand FORWARD; when it has marched 20 paces, its chief commands: HALT, and then Right—DRESS.

The other platoons continue to march forward without approaching the line; as soon as each one arrives abreast of the fourth file from the left of the platoon which should be on its right, its chief commands: 1. Right—TURN; 2. FORWARD; this platoon then directs itself towards the place it is to occupy In line, and on arriving abreast of the croups of the horses in line Its chief commands: 1. HALT; 2. DRESS. The squadron being aligned, the Captain commands: FRONT.